Norman and Beard

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Norman and Beard were a pipe organ manufacturer based in Norwich from 1887 to 1916.

History[edit]

The origins of the company are from a business founded in Diss in 1870 by Ernest William Norman (1851–1927). In 1876 he moved to Norwich where he went into partnership with his brother, Herbert John Norman (1861–1936). In 1887 they went into partnership with George A. Wales Beard, and the company was formed. In 1896 the company opened a second office in London.

They worked closely with Robert Hope-Jones and held the patents on many of his developments, including electro-pneumatic action.[1]

The company merged with William Hill & Sons of London in 1916, and became William Hill & Son & Norman & Beard Ltd..

Organs[edit]

  • St. John's Church, Bangalore 1895
  • Norwich Cathedral 1899[2] (NPOR N06483)
  • Duke's Hall, Royal Academy of Music 1900 [3] (NPOR D07229)
  • St Mary's Church, Oldswinford 1901 [4] (NPOR N03681)
  • Our Lady Star of the Sea, Roman Catholic church in Lowestoft 1902 (wind blown, three manual organ of 1,152 pipes, still in a pristine extant condition) [5]
  • Nairn Old Parish Church, Nairn 1903 (NPOR R00423)
  • Leeds Cathedral 1904
  • Cheltenham College 1905 (NPOR N07470)
  • Town Hall, Wellington NZ 1906
  • St. Mary the Virgin, Nonington, Kent 1906 (NPOR D04898)
  • Parish Church of Kilmun, Argyll & Bute, 1906 (water-powered)
  • Town Hall, Auckland, New Zealand 1907-1912
  • Bethlehem Welsh Independent Chapel, Rhosllanerchrugog, 1908
  • All Saints' Church, Yelvertoft, Northamptonshire. 1908
  • Great Hall, University of Birmingham 1908 (NPOR N07270)
  • Winchester College Chapel 1908 (NPOR D01086)
  • Emmanuel College, Cambridge 1909 (NPOR N05206)
  • All Saints' Church, Binfield, Berkshire. 1910 (NPOR D01111)
  • St Mary the Virgin, South Elmsall, West Yorkshire. 1910 (NPOR K01511)
  • Town Hall, Auckland NZ 1911
  • St. Michael's Church, Aylsham, Norfolk, 1911
  • St. Michael & All Angels Church, Wilmington, Kent 1912 (NPOR N08477)
  • The Andaz, Temple 1912 (London)
  • St Mary's Parish Church, Slough, Berkshire 1912
  • St Mary's Church, Baldock 1913
  • St Mary's Church, Reigate, Surrey, UK. 1911 [6]
  • Walhampton School Chapel, Lymington, Hampshire, 1913
  • Usher Hall, Edinburgh 1914 (NPOR D07910)
  • St John the Evangelist, Bierley, Bradford 1916 (NPOR N02678)
  • Town Hall, Johannesburg 1916
  • Sherborne School Chapel, Sherborne, Dorset. 1926
  • St John's Cathedral Brisbane Australia
  • Trinity Methodist Church, Felixstowe, Suffolk, UK. 1906.
  • Calvert Methodist Church, Hastings, Sussex, UK
  • City Hall, Cape Town, South Africa
  • United Church, Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Bethesda Chapel, Llanwrtyd Wells, Wales .1906
  • Troqueer Parish Church, Dumfries
  • St. Christopher' Anglican Church, West Vancouver, B.C. Canada. 1963
  • St. Mary's Scottish Episcopal Church, Glencoe, Highland. 1916
  • NG Church Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga South Africa 1912

References[edit]

  1. ^ The History of the English Organ, Stephen Bicknell
  2. ^ "The organ". Norwich Cathedral. Archived from the original on 16 October 2011. Retrieved 6 October 2011
  3. ^ http://apollo.ram.ac.uk/emuweb/pages/ram/display.php?irn=1235
  4. ^ Peacock, Roy. A Victorian Church, St Mary's Old Swinford, Stourbridge: the Story of its Re-building in the Nineteenth Century. [Revised edition.] P.C.C. of St Mary's Oldswinford, 2008. p. 44.
  5. ^ "Our Lady Star of the Sea website, Music page".
  6. ^ http://www.stmaryreigate.org/the-organ/