North Atlanta High School

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North Atlanta High School
Address
4111 Northside Parkway
Atlanta, Georgia
United States
Coordinates 33°49′57″N 84°24′22″W / 33.832621°N 84.406244°W / 33.832621; -84.406244Coordinates: 33°49′57″N 84°24′22″W / 33.832621°N 84.406244°W / 33.832621; -84.406244
Information
Type Public secondary
Motto "Diversity, Scholarship, Community"
Established 1991
School district Atlanta Public Schools
Principal Curtis Douglass
Grades 912
Number of students 1800
Color(s) Silver and black
Mascot Warrior
Average SAT scores 1442
Publication Warrior Wire[1]
Yearbook Invictus
Website
Sutton Middle School, facing south

North Atlanta High School is a high school of approximately 1,800 students in the Paces neighborhood of Atlanta, Georgia, United States. The school is a part of Atlanta Public Schools.

The school was formed after North Fulton High School combined with Northside High School during the 1991–1992 school year. This merger resulted in North Atlanta High School being the only high school in Atlanta Public Schools (APS) to host two magnet programs: the International Studies Program and the Performance Arts. The Performance Arts program is now technically defunct, but North Atlanta continues to encourage students' artistic abilities and talents in performance.

History[edit]

North Fulton High School (1920–1991)[edit]

The Fulton County School Board formed North Fulton High School in September 1920. Population grew rapidly during the 1920s along the Peachtree Road corridor, which was considered the north of the city at that time, and the census tract of Buckhead increased from 2,603 in 1920 to 10,356 in 1930. North Fulton was the first and for a number of years the only high school serving the urban and predominantly affluent Peachtree Road corridor. APS took control of the school when the area was annexed into the city of Atlanta.

North Fulton High School started out as a segregated school under the state-mandated system that prevailed until the early 1960s. The school reached a racial balance under the majority-minority program. In the 1970s the school developed a more racially balanced faculty as well.

Through the years, North Fulton acquired a large international student body, and ranked at the top academically. In 1981, North Fulton became the site for the School of International Studies, a magnet program that became nationally recognized. Today this program continues at North Atlanta High School.

Northside High School (1950–1991)[edit]

Fulton County School Board opened Northside High School in 1950 at the current location of the Sutton Middle School: 7th-8th Grade Campus building. Northside High School became part of the APS when the property was annexed into the city of Atlanta. The school colors were purple and white, and the school nickname was the Tigers. In 1969, APS opened a planetarium at the Northside campus. Originally, it was one of three planetariums owned by Atlanta Public Schools (the other two being at Fulton and Harper High). It can seat 110 people.[2] A magnet program in the performing arts was started in 1972.[citation needed]

North Atlanta High School (1991–2013)[edit]

In September 1991, by consolidating North Fulton High School and Northside High School, the Atlanta Board of Education formed North Atlanta High School. The students attended the North Fulton campus until June 1994, while the former Northside High School underwent a $15 million renovation. In 1998, North Atlanta was designated as a Georgia School of Excellence by the Georgia Department of Education.[3] After the 2001–2002 school year, West Fulton High School and Harper-Archer High School closed. Since there wasn't adequate capacity at Douglass High School, the closest school, the students in the Scott and Boyd Elementary school districts were rezoned to North Atlanta. This area encompassed both Hollywood Courts and the former Perry Homes. Starting in 2004, Newsweek rated North Atlanta as being one of the best high schools in the country for three consecutive years.[4] In the spring of 2008, the Aga Khan visited and gave a speech at North Atlanta as a part of the annual IB conference.

North Atlanta High School[edit]

As of the 2008–2009 school year, the incoming 9th grade class was zoned to Douglass High School. In 2008, North Atlanta began its partnership with the Juilliard School. Juilliard began its inaugural Summer Jazz program in June 2008, and planned to continue the camp in future years. In the summer of 2009, APS started its $40 million renovation on the building. Phase 1 included the expansion and modernization of the instructional classrooms, while Phase 2 included the grounds and rooms such as the theatre and the cafeteria.

Recent developments[edit]

Phase two of the SPLOST 3 renovation, in the summer of 2010, included renovations and modernization of all non-instructional facilities such as the media center and athletic areas.

The 2010–2011 school year saw the third wave of Atlanta Public Schools' High School Transformation Initiative. The new changes included extending the IB Diploma Programme to each SLC, eliminating the status of a magnet program from the International Studies SLC, and other initiatives aimed at increasing student achievement. A fourth SLC was tentative for the transformation.

In order to alleviate overcrowding at Sutton Middle School, around 2009 APS issued a proposal to create state-of-the-art facilities for NAHS elsewhere in Buckhead, and to use the then-current NAHS facilities on Northside Drive at Kingswood Lane as a new middle school. However, instead of creating a new middle school, it was decided that Sutton Middle School would be separated into two campuses. Its new 7th and 8th Grade Campus was established at this location (apparently by the 2013–2014 school year), and its 6th Grade Campus remains at the school's original location on Powers Ferry Road at Jett Road, 3.5 miles north of the Northside Drive campus. [5]

Campus[edit]

APS purchased a former IBM office building on Northside Parkway in the Cumberland district of Atlanta, along with its 56 acres (23 ha) wooded campus. The 11-story building, which previously housed 5000 IBM employees in its 507,093 square feet (47,110.5 m2), was converted to new facilities for NAHS's 2400 students. The campus straddles a retention pond.[6] The parking deck is used for parking, while the more distant parking lots have become a track and field. Another building, deemed unsuitable for the school, was imploded on October 27, 2012, to be rebuilt as a theater and gymnasium, among other purposes. The construction was performed by J.E. Dunn. The new school was ready for the 2013–2014 school year.[citation needed] The cost of the school building altogether was $147 million; APS received some criticism for the cost, which was relatively high in the U.S. South.[7]

Student activities[edit]

The North Fulton Quiz Bowl team won the 1990 AA state title in the tournament sanctioned by the Georgia Academic Team Association, and Northside won the 1991 AAA title. In 1998, the North Atlanta Quiz Bowl team won the state championship[8] before going on to finish with a No. 16 national ranking at the Tournament of Champions in Chicago, Illinois.[9] The team also earned a berth in the 2000 Tournament of Champions.[10]

Athletics[edit]

State championships[edit]

Northside
  • Football: 1957 (AAA)[11]
  • Boys' track: 1956 (AA);[12] 1979 (7AAAA) mile relay State Champions
North Fulton
  • Girls' swimming: 1957, 1958, 1959[13]
  • Football: 1966 (AA)[14]
  • Boys' cross country: 1953–54, 1955, 1956, 1966 (Div. II), 1971 (AA), 1972 (AA), 1973 (AA), 1974 (AA), 1975 (AA), 1979 (AA)[15]
  • Boys' basketball: 1953 (AA)[16]
  • Boys' track: 1954 (AA tie w/ Griffin), 1967 (AA), 1974 (AA)[17]
North Atlanta
  • Girls' basketball: 2000 (AAA)[18]
  • Football: 2013 (AAA)[19]

Feeder schools[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Warrior Wire
  2. ^ North Atlanta Planetarium Home Page
  3. ^ Atlanta Public Schools – Schools of Excellence
  4. ^ America's Top Public High Schools | Newsweek Best High Schools | Newsweek.com
  5. ^ [1] Archived 4 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ "North Atlanta High School." Atlanta Public Schools. Retrieved on January 3, 2017.
  7. ^ Severson, Kim (2013-08-06). "A $147 Million Signal of Faith in Atlanta’s Public Schools". The New York Times. Retrieved 2017-01-13. 
  8. ^ "GATA History". Georgia Academic Team Association. 5 November 2011. Retrieved 16 January 2009. 
  9. ^ "1998 Tournament of Champions rankings". Quiz Bowl Wiki. 2 March 2009. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  10. ^ "2000 Tournament of Champions rankings". Quiz Bowl Wiki. 5 November 2011. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  11. ^ "GHSA Football Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  12. ^ "GHSA Boys Track Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  13. ^ "GHSA Swimming Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  14. ^ "GHSA Football Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  15. ^ "GHSA Boys Cross Country Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  16. ^ "GHSA Boys Basketball Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  17. ^ "GHSA Boys Track Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  18. ^ "GHSA Girls Basketball Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  19. ^ "GHSA Football Champions". GHSA.net. Retrieved 2014-08-16. 
  20. ^ "10 Tips for Freshman". Retrieved 2016-08-10. 
  21. ^ "David Cross". Yahoo! Movies. Retrieved 5 May 2010. 
  22. ^ http://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/G/GradSa00.htm. Retrieved 13 September 2015.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  23. ^ "Jasmine Guy". Yahoo! Movies. Retrieved 5 May 2010. 
  24. ^ http://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/M/MilnBi21.htm. Retrieved 13 September 2014.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  25. ^ http://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/N/NuttEd20.htm. Retrieved 13 September 2015.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  26. ^ "In Memory of Elbert Earl Patton, Jr.". obits.dignitymemorial.com. Retrieved May 21, 2012. 
  27. ^ "RuPaul bio". RuPaul website. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  28. ^ "Bobby Valentino – Biography". Hip Hop Lead. Retrieved 5 May 2010. 

External links[edit]