North Atlantic moist mixed forests

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North Atlantic moist mixed forests
2018 07 13 Schottland (34) Viewpoint Heilam Lairg.jpg
Loch Eriboll, in Northern Scotland
Ecoregion PA0429.svg
Map of North Atlantic moist mixed forests
Ecology
RealmPalearctic
BiomeTemperate broadleaf and mixed forests
BordersCeltic broadleaf forests and Caledonian forest
Geography
Area22,000[1] km2 (8,500 sq mi)
CountriesRepublic of Ireland, United Kingdom (Northern Ireland and Scotland) and Denmark (Faroe Islands)
Conservation
Conservation statusCritical/endangered[2]

The North Atlantic moist mixed forests is a temperate broadleaf and mixed forest ecoregion in Northwestern Europe. It consists of maritime forests and heathlands on the western and northern coasts of Ireland, Scotland, and neighboring islands. The ecoregion has undergone major habitat loss.

Location[edit]

The North Atlantic moist mixed forests occur along the western and northern coasts of Ireland and Scotland, stretching from southwestern Ireland to the north coast of Scotland, and including the Hebrides, Shetland, Orkney, and Faroe islands.[3]

Flora[edit]

Naturally-occurring plant communities include:[4]

Fauna[edit]

Threats[edit]

Western Scotland's and Ireland's forests have undergone significant habitat loss and damage through deforestation and hunting of its once abundant wildlife. Animals such as the grey wolf, wild boar, brown bear, European bison, Eurasian lynx, tarpan and golden eagle used to inhabit the forests; however, due to over-hunting and excessive timber extraction, the animals have lost their habitats. The North Atlantic moist mixed forests ecoregion is classified as critical/endangered by the World Wildlife Fund.

Protected areas[edit]

Protected areas in the ecoregion include:

Prehistory[edit]

The ecoregion is relatively young with regard to human settlement, due to glaciation during the most recent ice age, less than 10,000 years ago. Mesolithic peoples were certainly in evidence circa 9000 to 8000 years ago throughout the present day Irish portion of the ecoregion, as well as somewhat later in the western Scotland areas of the North Atlantic moist mixed forests. Neolithic farming ensued, as grain farming technologies developed, along with advancing forms of livestock tending, along with appearance of some of the early Neolithic and Bronze Age archaeological monumental sites in the region including standing stones and stone circles.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "North Atlantic moist mixed forests" World Wildlife Fund. Accessed 18 April 2020. [1]
  2. ^ "North Atlantic moist mixed forests" World Wildlife Fund. Accessed 18 April 2020. [2]
  3. ^ Terrestrial Ecoregions of the World dataset. Conservation Biology Institute. Accessed 18 April 2020. [3]
  4. ^ "North Atlantic moist mixed forests" World Wildlife Fund. Accessed 18 April 2020. [4]
  5. ^ "DWARF SHRUB HEATH (UK BAP BROAD HABITAT)". Scottish Natural Heritage. Accessed 18 April 2020. [5]
  6. ^ "Lewis Peatlands". Protected Planet. Accessed 19 April 2020
  7. ^ "Stack's to Mullaghareirk Mountains, West Limerick Hills and Mount Eagle SPA in Ireland". Protected Planet. Retrieved 28 March 2020.