North British Review

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The North British Review was a Scottish periodical. It was founded in 1844 to act as the organ of the new Free Church of Scotland, the first editor being David Welsh.[1] It was published until 1871;[2] in the last few years of its existence it had a liberal Catholic editorial policy.[3]

Under Lord Acton's influence the Review took on a different character, with Aurelio Buddeus and Constantin Frantz writing on European affairs. Its editorial line rose above nationalistic politics, and was strongly opposed to Otto von Bismarck.[4]

Editors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matthew, H. C. G. "Welsh, David". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/29025.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  2. ^ Alvin Sullivan (7 November 1983). British Literary Magazines: The romantic age, 1789-1836. Greenwood Press. p. 117 note 6. ISBN 978-0-313-22872-8. 
  3. ^ Laurel Brake; Marysa Demoor (2009). Dictionary of Nineteenth-Century Journalism: In Great Britain and Ireland. Academia Press. p. 3. ISBN 978-90-382-1340-8. Retrieved 8 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Roland Hill (2000). Lord Acton. Yale University Press. p. 155. ISBN 9 780300 079562. 
  5. ^ Millar, Gordon F. "Maitland, Edward Francis". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/17821.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^  "Hanna, William". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  7. ^ Griffin, Nicholas. "Fraser, Alexander Campbell". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/33247.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  8. ^ Ritchie, Lionel Alexander. "Duns, John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/45534.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  9. ^ Ritchie, Lionel Alexander. "Blaikie, William Garden". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/2562.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  10. ^ Robert Moray; David Stevenson (2007). Letters of Sir Robert Moray to the Earl of Kincardine, 1657-73. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. p. xii. ISBN 978-0-7546-5497-1. Retrieved 7 November 2012. 
  11. ^ John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton Baron Acton; Richard Simpson; Josef Lewis Altholz (1975). The correspondence of Lord Acton and Richard Simpson. 3. CUP Archive. p. 269 note 2. ISBN 978-0-521-20552-8. Retrieved 7 November 2012. 
  12. ^ Altholz, Josef L. "Acton, John Emerich Edward Dalberg". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/30329.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)