North Brunswick, New Jersey

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North Brunswick, New Jersey
Township of North Brunswick
Rutgers Gardens in North Brunswick
Rutgers Gardens in North Brunswick
North Brunswick Township highlighted in Middlesex County.
North Brunswick Township highlighted in Middlesex County.
North Brunswick is located in Middlesex County, New Jersey
North Brunswick
North Brunswick
Location in Middlesex County
North Brunswick is located in New Jersey
North Brunswick
North Brunswick
Location in New Jersey
North Brunswick is located in the United States
North Brunswick
North Brunswick
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°27′01″N 74°28′46″W / 40.450387°N 74.479455°W / 40.450387; -74.479455Coordinates: 40°27′01″N 74°28′46″W / 40.450387°N 74.479455°W / 40.450387; -74.479455[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMiddlesex
First mentionFebruary 28, 1779
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forBraunschweig, Germany or King George II of Great Britain
Government
 • TypeMayor-Council-Administrator
 • BodyTownship Council
 • MayorFrancis "Mac" Womack III (D, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 • AdministratorKathryn Monzo[5]
 • Municipal clerkLisa Russo[6]
Area
 • Total12.272 sq mi (31.783 km2)
 • Land11.997 sq mi (31.071 km2)
 • Water0.275 sq mi (0.712 km2)  2.24%
Area rank187th of 566 in state
10th of 25 in county[1]
Elevation121 ft (37 m)
Population
 • Total40,742
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
41,431
 • Rank50th of 566 in state
10th of 25 in county[13]
 • Density3,396.2/sq mi (1,311.3/km2)
 • Density rank192nd of 566 in state
14th of 25 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08902[14]
Area code(s)732 and 908[15]
FIPS code3402352560[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0882164[1][18]
Websitewww.northbrunswicknj.gov

North Brunswick is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. At the 2010 United States Census, the population was 40,742,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 4,455 (+12.3%) from the 36,287 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 5,000 (+16.0%) from the 31,287 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] Located south of the city of New Brunswick, North Brunswick was named for its earlier-established neighbor, South Brunswick, New Jersey.[20] The "Brunswick" comes from New Brunswick, which was named after the German city of Braunschweig (formerly translated in English as Brunswick) or for the British royal House of Brunswick. North and South Brunswick, in turn, became the namesakes for East Brunswick.[21] Alternatively, the city gets its name from King George II of Great Britain, the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg.[22][23]

History[edit]

The area that would become North Brunswick had been settled by the Lenape Native Americans. European settlers from France and The Netherlands acquired land in 1761 from the Lenape that would become North Brunswick.[24]

North Brunswick was first mentioned in Middlesex Freeholder Board minutes of February 28, 1779. North Brunswick Township was incorporated on February 21, 1798, by the New Jersey Legislature's Township Act of 1798 as one of the state's initial group of 104 townships.[25] Portions of the township have since separated to create East Brunswick (February 28, 1860) and Milltown (January 29, 1889). Territorial exchanges were made with Franklin Township, Somerset County, New Jersey in 1850 and 1858, with South Brunswick in 1856 and with New Brunswick in 1860, 1917 and 1929.[25]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 12.272 square miles (31.783 km2), including 11.997 square miles (31.071 km2) of land and 0.275 square miles (0.712 km2) of water (2.24%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Adams, Berdines Corner, Black Horse, Bodines Corner, Franklin Park, Georges Road, Livingston Park, Maple Meade, Patricks Corner and Red Lion.[26] The northern portion of the township, near the New Brunswick border, is mainly middle class while the southern and eastern sections tend to be more affluent, with a few homes priced around $1 million.[citation needed]

The township borders the municipalities of East Brunswick, Milltown, New Brunswick and South Brunswick in Middlesex County; and Franklin Township in Somerset County.[27][28][29]

Like many other New Jersey communities, North Brunswick is faced with the issues of suburban sprawl and open space preservation. The 104.91-acre (42.46 ha)[30][31] Otken Farm property on Route 130 between Adams Lane and Renaissance Boulevard was purchased by the township to be converted into North Brunswick Community Park, which opened in April 2007.[32][33] The nearby Pulda Farm, on Route 130 at Wood Avenue, however may be developed into an age-restricted community pending legal challenge.[34] Re-development of the site of the former Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical plant on U.S. Route 1 between Adams Lane and Aaron Road is currently the subject of a public hearing process that will determine what may be built on the property. There is also discussion of building an NJ Transit commuter railroad station on the site, along the Northeast Corridor Line. Other parcels slated for development into retail shopping centers include the currently wooded corner of Route 130 and Adams Lane diagonally across from the Maple Meade Plaza.[35]

North Brunswick is part of the watershed of the Lawrence Brook, a tributary of the Raritan River. The brook's watershed covers 48 square miles (120 km2) that also includes East Brunswick, Milltown, New Brunswick and South Brunswick.[36]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
17902,312
18103,980
18204,2757.4%
18305,27423.4%
18405,86611.2%
185010,01970.8%
18601,145*−88.6%
18701,124−1.8%
18801,25111.3%
18901,238−1.0%
1900847*−31.6%
191099016.9%
19201,39941.3%
19303,622158.9%
19404,56226.0%
19506,45041.4%
196010,09956.6%
197016,69165.3%
198022,22033.1%
199031,28740.8%
200036,28716.0%
201040,74212.3%
Est. 201941,431[12][37][38]1.7%
Population sources: 1790-1920[39]
1840[40] 1870[41][42] 1880-1890[43]
1890-1910[44] 1910-1930[45]
1930-1990[46] 2000[47][48] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[25]

2010 Census[edit]

The 2010 United States Census counted 40,742 people, 14,551 households, and 10,403.965 families in the township. The population density was 3,396.2 per square mile (1,311.3/km2). There were 15,045 housing units at an average density of 1,254.1 per square mile (484.2/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 46.61% (18,991) White, 17.47% (7,116) Black or African American, 0.42% (171) Native American, 24.27% (9,888) Asian, 0.04% (15) Pacific Islander, 8.16% (3,323) from other races, and 3.04% (1,238) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.73% (7,223) of the population.[9]

The 14,551 households accounted 35.7% with children under the age of 18 living with them; 53.4% were married couples living together; 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.5% were non-families. 22.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.22.[9]

In the township, the population age was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.5 years. For every 100 females, the population had 97.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 95.2 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,469 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,515) and the median family income was $91,053 (+/- $3,268). Males had a median income of $60,285 (+/- $3,591) versus $50,018 (+/- $2,499) for females. The per capita income for the township was $32,944 (+/- $1,441). About 4.5% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.2% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.[49]

2000 Census[edit]

At the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 36,287 people, 13,635 households and 9,367 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,018.3 per square mile (1,165.6/km2). There were 13,932 housing units at an average density of 1,158.8 per square mile (447.5/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 62.73% White, 15.27% African American, 0.17% Native American, 14.20% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 4.70% from other races, and 2.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.40% of the population.[47][48]

There were 13,635 households of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.12.[47][48]

23.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 36.5% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.3 males.[47][48]

The median household income in the township was $61,325, and the median income for a family was $70,812. Males had a median income of $48,961 versus $35,971 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,431. 4.7% of the population and 2.7% of families were below the poverty line. 4.7% of the population and 2.7% of families were below the poverty line. Of the total people living in poverty, 4.0% were under the age of 18 and 8.5% were 65 or older.[47][48]

In addition to the township's residents, an average daily population of 1,182 inmates are housed at the Middlesex County Adult Correctional Center, located on Route 130 at Apple Orchard Lane.[50]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

North Brunswick is governed using the Mayor-Council-Administrator form of local government in New Jersey. The township is one of three municipalities statewide governed under this form.[51] It was formed as a result of a Charter Study in 1982. One of the variations available under the Faulkner Act, the Mayor is directly elected by the voters and serves a term of four years, while the Township Council is comprised of six Council Members elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two council seats up for election each year.[7] The primary responsibilities of the Council are to serve as the legislative body of the township, approve the annual budget presented by the Mayor, approve payment of bills and serve as liaisons to boards and committees.[52]

As of 2020, the Mayor of North Brunswick is Francis "Mac" Womack III, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023.[3] The Township Council is comprised of Council President Amanda Guadagnino (D, 2022), Ralph Andrews (D, 2022), Claribel Cortes (D, 2020; appointed to serve an unexpired term), Robert Davis (D, 2020), William Lopez (D, 2021) and Cologero "Carlo" Socio (D, 2021).[53][54][55][56][57][58]

In April 2020, the Township Council selected Claribel Cortes from a list of three candidates nominated by the Democratic municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2020 that became vacant following the death of Robert Corbin.[59]

Former mayors include Paul Matacera, who served for more than 16 years, and David Spaulding, the township's first Republican mayor in more than 25 years.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

North Brunswick is located in the 12th Congressional District[60] and is part of New Jersey's 17th state legislative district.[10][61][62]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Twelfth Congressional District is represented by Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, Ewing Township).[63][64] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[65] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[66][67]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 17th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Bob Smith (D, Piscataway) and in the General Assembly by Joseph Danielsen (D, Franklin Township, Somerset County) and Joseph V. Egan (D, New Brunswick).[68][69]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large on a partisan basis to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2015, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (D, term ends December 31, 2015, Carteret; Ex-officio on all committees),[70] Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (D, 2017; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township; County Administration),[71] Kenneth Armwood (D, 2016, Piscataway; Business Development and Education),[72] Charles Kenny ( D, 2016, Woodbridge Township; Finance),[73] H. James Polos (D, 2015, Highland Park; Public Safety and Health),[74] Charles E. Tomaro (D, 2017, Edison; Infrastructure Management)[75] and Blanquita B. Valenti (D, 2016, New Brunswick; Community Services).[76][77] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D, Old Bridge Township),[78] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016, Piscataway)[79] and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick).[77][80]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 22,079 registered voters in North Brunswick Township, of which 8,302 (37.6%) were registered as Democrats, 2,410 (10.9%) were registered as Republicans and 11,352 (51.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 15 voters registered to other parties.[81]

Presidential Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016[82] 29.7% 4,810 67.4% 10,915 2.8% 461
2012[83] 30.4% 4,605 68.4% 10,367 1.2% 175
2008[84] 33.3% 5,270 65.0% 10,290 1.0% 156
2004[85] 40.3% 5,643 58.4% 8,180 0.6% 125

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 68.4% of the vote (10,367 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 30.4% (4,605 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (175 votes), among the 15,264 ballots cast by the township's 23,172 registered voters (117 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 65.9%.[86][87] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 65.0% of the vote (10,290 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 33.3% (5,270 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (156 votes), among the 15,837 ballots cast by the township's 22,580 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.1%.[88] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 58.4% of the vote (8,180 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 40.3% (5,643 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (125 votes), among the 14,010 ballots cast by the township's 20,477 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 68.4.[89]

Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2017[90] 33.4% 2,732 64.3% 5,259 2.3% 191
2013[91] 54.6% 4,326 44.1% 3,596 1.2% 99
2009[92] 43.7% 4,056 48.3% 4,482 6.9% 642
2005[93] 38.9% 3,324 52.4% 4,766 3.9% 336

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 54.6% of the vote (4,326 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 44.1% (3,496 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (99 votes), among the 8,034 ballots cast by the township's 23,385 registered voters (113 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 34.4%.[91][94] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 48.3% of the vote (4,482 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 43.7% (4,056 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.9% (547 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (95 votes), among the 9,279 ballots cast by the township's 21,714 registered voters, yielding a 42.7% turnout.[95]

Education[edit]

The North Brunswick Township Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade.[96] As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprising six schools, had an enrollment of 6,045 students and 516.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.7:1.[97] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[98]) are John Adams Elementary School[99] (657 students; K-5), Arthur M. Judd Elementary School[100] (857; PreK-5), Livingston Park Elementary School[101] (590; K-5), Parsons Elementary School[102] (746; K-5), Linwood Middle School[103] for grades 6 - 8 (1,362) and North Brunswick Township High School[104] for grades 9-12 (1,787).[105]

John Adams School was recognized in 1998-99 as a National Blue Ribbon Award School of Excellence. The district's high school was recognized in 1999–2000.[106]

Eighth grade students from all of Middlesex County are eligible to apply to attend the high school programs offered by the Middlesex County Vocational and Technical Schools, a county-wide vocational school district that offers full-time career and technical education at Middlesex County Academy in Edison, the Academy for Allied Health and Biomedical Sciences in Woodbridge Township and at its East Brunswick, Perth Amboy and Piscataway technical high schools, with no tuition charged to students for attendance.[107][108]

Portions of the Rutgers University School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (formerly Cook College) is located on College Farm Road off Route 1 on the northern end of the township.[109] DeVry University has a campus in North Brunswick on U.S. Route 1 between Milltown Road and Ryders Lane.[110] Chamberlain College of Nursing's administrative offices are located on the DeVry University site.[111] Anthem Institute had a branch on Route 1 on the Technology Centre of New Jersey campus that closed in 2014 as part of a group of closures nationwide.[112]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

View north along US 1, the largest and busiest road in North Brunswick

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 101.51 miles (163.36 km) of roadways, of which 77.57 miles (124.84 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.23 miles (11.64 km) by Middlesex County and 16.71 miles (26.89 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[113] Major roads in North Brunswick include:[114]

Limited access roads are accessible outside the township, such as Interstate 287 in bordering Franklin Township. The New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) is accessible from exits in East Brunswick and South Brunswick.[109]

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit Rail Operations (NJT) originates trains to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan during peak hours from the Jersey Avenue station in New Brunswick. A new North Brunswick station on its Northeast Corridor Line has been proposed for the former Johnson & Johnson site on Route 1 and Aaron Road.[126] In January 2013 NJT announced that the station would be built in 2018 in conjunction with the transit-oriented development. In addition to the new station the agency plans to build a flyover (balloon loop and flying junction) called the MId-Line Loop south of the new station allowing trains turn around and enter and leave the Northeast Corridor without crossing over tracks.[127]

NJ Transit provides local bus service on the 811 and 814 routes.[128][129]

Middlesex County Area Transit (MCAT) shuttles provide service on routes operating across the county,[130] including the M1 route, which operates between Jamesburg and the New Brunswick train station[131] and the M5 Jersey Avenue/Brunswick-Commercial Avenue Shuttle.[132]

Suburban Trails offers service to and from New York City on Route 100 between Princeton and the Port Authority Bus Terminal; and Route 600 between East Windsor and Wall Street in Downtown Manhattan.[133]

The Raritan River Railroad ran through North Brunswick, but is now defunct along this part of the line.Proposals have been made to use the line as a light rail route.[134]

Community[edit]

There are various communities within North Brunswick. One of many is the Italian American community. The Italian American community of North Brunswick and other Middlesex County towns celebrate their heritage annually at Carnevale Italiano, a 20-year-old carnival organized by the Italian-American Social Club. This event has been a huge part of North Brunswick's culture, as Middlesex County ranks fourth out of New Jersey's 21 counties in its population of Italian Americans.[135] A highlight of the carnival is a fireworks show by Grucci.[136]

Each year, the sports associations of the township host the North Brunswick Youth Sports Festival. The township high school also hosts a heritage day each year in Babbage Park. This festival showcases the many cultures that make up North Brunswick.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with North Brunswick include:

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor's Office, Township of North Brunswick. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Administration, Township of North Brunswick. Accessed March 1, 2020.
  6. ^ Clerk, Township of North Brunswick. Accessed March 1, 2020.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of North Brunswick, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
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  20. ^ The Changing Landscape of North Brunswick, Rutgers University. Accessed November 25, 2012. "The aptness of the name 'North Brunswick' has proven a puzzle to many modern historians, since the township is actually situated south of New Brunswick and west of East Brunswick. However, during the early part of the 19th century, the area was commonly referred to as the 'north ward of New Brunswick' and the township is located north of the earlier organized Township of South Brunswick."
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  36. ^ What We Do, Lawrence Brook Watershed Partnership. Accessed November 15, 2019. "The Lawrence Brook Watershed Partnership, Inc. (LBWP) is a not-for-profit organization with the mission to protect the water in a 48-square-mile area, the Lawrence Brook watershed (USGSHUC code: 02030105130); this area extends over parts of 5 municipalities: New Brunswick, East Brunswick, North Brunswick, South Brunswick, and Milltown; it also covers most of Rutgers University's Cook Campus."
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  49. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for North Brunswick township, Middlesex County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 28, 2012.
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External links[edit]