North Carolina Highway 94

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North Carolina Highway 94 marker

North Carolina Highway 94
Route information
Maintained by NCDOT
Length: 73.5 mi[1] (118.3 km)
Existed: 1930 – present
Tourist
routes:
Alligator River Route
Edenton-Windsor Loop
Major junctions
South end: NC 45 in Swan Quarter
 
North end: NC 32 near Edenton
Location
Counties: Hyde, Tyrrell, Washington, Chowan
Highway system
NC 93 I‑95

North Carolina Highway 94 (NC 94) is a north–south North Carolina highway running for approximately seventy-three and a half miles (118.3 km) from southern Chowan County to Swan Quarter in Hyde County.

Route description[edit]

Albemarle Sound Bridge

The route spans the Albemarle Sound at the 3.5-mile (5.6 km) Albemarle Sound Bridge, connecting Chowan and Washington counties. It also crosses Lake Mattamuskeet at the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. The highway passes through the following municipalities:

History[edit]

NC 94 was established in 1930 as a new primary spur routing from NC 91, in Swindell Fork, to Fairfield.[2] In 1931, NC 94 was extended north on new primary routing to NC 90, in Columbia.[3] In 1935, NC 94's southern terminus was rerouted to US 264, in Rose Bay; the reroute was a swap with NC 6.[4] In 1942, NC 94 was rerouted at Fairfield onto new primary routing directly south through Lake Mattamuskeet. The nearly six-mile (9.7 km) causeway connects directly with US 264 near New Holland; the former alignment that went around the western banks of Lake Mattamuskeet were downgraded to secondary roads (Piney Woods Road (SR 1305) and Turnpike Road (SR 1304)).[5]

In 2000, NC 94 was extended both directions: At Lake Comfort, it goes west on a 7-mile (11 km) concurrency with US 264 to Swain Quarter, where it then splits off onto Main Street and continues till it reaches NC 45, its current southern terminus. At Columbia, NC 94 goes west on a 17-mile (27 km) concurrency with US 64 near Pea Ridge, where it then switches concurrences with NC 32. Traveling north, it crosses over the Albemarle Sound, then separates from NC 32 near St. Johns. On Soundside Road, it connects with Northeastern Regional Airport before reconnecting with NC 32 near Edenton and its current northern terminus.[6] In 2003, US 64 was rerouted onto new primary routing through Washington County and part of Tyrrell County, leaving NC 94 continuing along its former alignment.[7]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Hyde Swan Quarter 0.0 0.0 NC 45 (Oyster Creek Street / Main Street)
1.5 2.4 US 264 west – Belhaven West end of US 264 overlap
Lake Comfort 8.5 13.7 US 264 east – Engelhard East end of US 264 overlap
Tyrrell Columbia 43.5 70.0
US 64 east / US 64 Bus. east (Broad Street) – Manteo
East end of US 64 overlap; western terminus of US 64 Bus.
44.6 71.8 US 64 west – Plymouth West end of US 64 overlap
Washington 60.5 97.4 NC 32 / NC 37 south – Roper, Plymouth South end of NC 32 and NC 37 overlap
Albemarle Sound 62.6–
66.1
100.7–
106.4
Albemarle Sound Bridge
Chowan 67.4 108.5 NC 32 (Haughton Road) / NC 37 north – Edenton North end of NC 32 and NC 37 overlap
73.5 118.3 NC 32 (Yeopim Road / Poplar Neck Road) / Hobbs Lane – Edenton, Roper
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Google (May 16, 2015). "North Carolina Highway 94" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 16, 2015. 
  2. ^ State Highway System of North Carolina (PDF) (Map) (September 1930 ed.). Cartography by NCSHC. Raleigh: North Carolina State Highway Commission. 1930. Retrieved July 31, 2016. 
  3. ^ State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by NCSHC. Raleigh: North Carolina State Highway Commission. 1931. Retrieved July 31, 2016. 
  4. ^ State Highway System of North Carolina (Map). Cartography by NCSHC. Raleigh: North Carolina State Highway Commission. 1935. Retrieved July 31, 2016. 
  5. ^ North Carolina Primary Highway System (Map). Cartography by NCSHC. Raleigh: North Carolina State Highway Commission. 1942. Retrieved July 31, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Route Change (2000-04-28)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. April 28, 2000. Retrieved July 31, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Route Change (2003-09-15)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. September 15, 2003. Retrieved July 31, 2016. 

External links[edit]

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