North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission

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North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission
Agency overview
Jurisdiction State of North Carolina
Website N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is a state government agency created by the General Assembly in 1947 to conserve and sustain North Carolina's fish and wildlife resources through research, scientific management, wise use, and public input. The Commission is the regulatory agency responsible for the enforcement of N.C. fishing, hunting, trapping and boating laws.

Licenses and regulations[edit]

Hunting, fishing, trapping and boating[edit]

The agency issues licenses and permits for hunting, trapping, and fishing, as well as titles and registrations for boats 14 feet or longer and personal watercraft (jet skis) in the state. It employs peace officers (commonly called game wardens) who enforce the rules and regulations associated with these activities. The agency also constructs boating access areas that provide parking spaces for tow vehicles and trailers, and ramps and docks for launching boats into the water.

The sale of hunting and fishing licenses, federal grants and other receipts provide financial support of the agency. The Commission has an operational budget of approximately $65 million and employs over 590 full-time men and women across the state, including wildlife and fisheries biologists and technicians, wildlife officers, conservation educators, and public information, customer service, information technology, and administrative professionals.[1] According to the state's Department of Commerce, hunting and fishing ranked 12th on the state's top industries in 2014.[2]

Education[edit]

The agency operates three Wildlife Education Centers, one each in the mountain, Piedmont, and coastal plain regions of the state. From its headquarters in Raleigh, the Commission issues a wide variety of publications, including guides for outdoor enthusiasts, maps, conservation plans, and a monthly magazine entitled Wildlife in North Carolina.[3] The Commission also operates an online store that sells books and memorabilia associated with wildlife and conservation.[4]

Awards[edit]

Every year, the Commission recognizes those throughout North Carolina who contributed significantly to wildlife and outdoor management in the state. The Lawrence G. Diedrick Small Game Award is given to an organization or person "whose actions significantly and positively impact North Carolina's small game populations".[5] The Thomas L. Quay Wildlife Diversity Award, named for the late activist and professor of zoology at N.C. State University, goes to a leader for "conservation of wildlife diversity in North Carolina."[6] The Commission's most recent award, the Guy Bradley Award, "recognizes extraordinary individuals who have made an outstanding lifetime contribution to wildlife law enforcement, wildlife forensics or investigative techniques."[7]

Commission staff have also received awards. The highest received is the Governor's Award of Excellence, given to employees for dedicated service beyond the call of duty.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission". N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. 2017. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  2. ^ Lasley, Jim (December 3, 2014). "Hunting, fishing among top industries in NC". The News & Observer. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Publications". N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. 2017. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  4. ^ "Welcome to the N.C. Wild Store". N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. 2016. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  5. ^ Division of Wildlife Management, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (July 20, 2011). "Commission Seeking Small Game Award Nominations" (Press release). Raleigh, N.C. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  6. ^ North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (28 November 2016). "Nominations Sought for 2017 Wildlife Conservation Award" (Press release). Raleigh, N.C. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  7. ^ North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (April 21, 2017). "Wildlife Resources Commission's Maj. Todd Kennedy Receives Guy Bradley Award" (Press release). Raleigh, N.C. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 
  8. ^ North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (December 11, 2015). "Master Officer Kenneth Ashe Receives Governor's Award of Excellence" (Press release). Raleigh, N.C. Retrieved July 27, 2017. 

External links[edit]