North Cleveland Park

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North Cleveland Park
Intelsat headquarters
Intelsat headquarters
Map of Washington, D.C., with North Cleveland Park highlighted in red
Map of Washington, D.C., with North Cleveland Park highlighted in red
Coordinates: 38°56′59″N 77°05′24″W / 38.9497°N 77.09°W / 38.9497; -77.09Coordinates: 38°56′59″N 77°05′24″W / 38.9497°N 77.09°W / 38.9497; -77.09
CountryUnited States
DistrictWashington, D.C.
WardWard 3
Government
 • CouncilmemberMary Cheh

North Cleveland Park is a neighborhood in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C.

It is bounded by Albemarle Street NW to the north, Rodman and Quebec Streets NW to the south, Wisconsin and Nebraska Avenues NW to the west, and Connecticut Avenue to the east. It is served by the Van Ness–UDC station on the Washington Metro's Red Line, and is therefore — like the adjacent Forest Hills neighborhood — frequently referred to as Van Ness.[1][2]

North Cleveland Park should not be confused with the neighboring Cleveland Park to its south: although both are part of the original tract of land on which President Grover Cleveland built his summer estate in the 1880s, they are separate neighborhoods.

The neighborhood is home to the Van Ness campus of the University of the District of Columbia, the former headquarters of Intelsat, Sidwell Friends School, Sheridan School and several embassies, including those of Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Honduras, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Malaysia, Monaco, Morocco (future site), Nigeria, Pakistan, Singapore, Slovakia and the United Arab Emirates.[3] Many of these embassies are located within the International Chancery Center, the former site of the National Bureau of Standards.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/North-Cleveland-Park-Washington-DC.html
  2. ^ http://www.connave.com/vn.php
  3. ^ "Van Ness-UDC Metrorail Station". StationMasters. Archived from the original on 3 February 2013. Retrieved 5 October 2018.
  4. ^ United States Department of State. "History of the International Chancery Center (ICC)". Retrieved 5 October 2018.