North Eastern Athletic Conference

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North Eastern Athletic Conference
NEAC
North Eastern Athletic Conference logo
Established 2004
Association NCAA
Division Division III
Members 12 (12 in 2019)
Sports fielded
  • 18
    • men's: 9
    • women's: 9
Region Mid-Atlantic
Headquarters Gansevoort, New York
Commissioner Candice Poiss Murray
Website http://www.neacsports.com
Locations
North Eastern Athletic Conference locations

The North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA's Division III. Member institutions are located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

History[edit]

The North Eastern Athletic Conference was founded in 2004. The original membership consisted of the following schools: Baptist Bible College (now known as Clarks Summit University), Bard College, Philadelphia Biblical University (now known as Cairn University), Cazenovia College, Chestnut Hill College, D'Youville College, Keuka College, Keystone College, Penn State-Berks, Polytechnic University (later known as the Polytechnic Institute of New York University and now fully merged into NYU as its Tandon School of Engineering), State University of New York at Purchase (SUNY Purchase), and Villa Julie College (now known as Stevenson University).

At the conclusion of the 2006-07 season, the NEAC had a shifting of membership losing five institutions and gaining three new members. The departing members were: Bard, Chestnut Hill, Polytechnic (N.Y.), SUNY Purchase, and Stevenson; while the new members were: Penn State-Harrisburg, Wells College, and Wilson College. The NEAC consisted of 10 members, effective the 2007-08 season.

At the conclusion of the 2007-08 season, the NEAC lost an additional three institutions while gaining two new members. The departing members were: Baptist Bible, Cairn, and Keystone (all to the Pennsylvania Athletic Conference, currently named the Colonial States Athletic Conference. The new members were: State University of New York at Cobleskill (SUNY Cobleskill) and State University of New York Institute of Technology (SUNYIT). The NEAC consisted of bringing the total to nine members, effective the 2008-09 season.

The NEAC accepted four associate member institutions for the 2008-09 season; they were: Medaille College (for men's and women's lacrosse), Rutgers University–Camden (for men's golf), State University of New York at Oneonta (for men's tennis), and the University of Dallas (in men's soccer, men's golf, men's & women's cross country, and men's & women's basketball). The University of Dallas also competed in women's volleyball to the NEAC in the 2009–10 season.

At the conclusion of the 2008–09 season, the NEAC lost an additional founding member in D'Youville. In the 2009–10 season, the NEAC welcomed three additional new members in the College of Saint Elizabeth, Penn State-Abington, and State University of New York at Morrisville (SUNY Morrisville). The NEAC had accepted four associate member institutions in that same season. Additionally, the NEAC also began a three year partnership with the North Atlantic Conference in four sports: baseball; women's lacrosse; and men's and women's tennis. Departing the NEAC at the conclusion of the 2009–10 season were associate members the University of Dallas and SUNY Oneonta.

In the 2010-11 season, the NEAC welcomed by Gallaudet University. In the 2011–12 season, the NEAC gained one new full member in Lancaster Bible College while Rutgers–Camden (already an associate member in men's golf) joined the NEAC in men's tennis. The partnership between the NEAC and the NAC ended for baseball and women's lacrosse following the 2011-12 season.

At the conclusion of the 2012–13 season, the NEAC lost one full member in Penn State-Harrisburg. In the 2013–14 season, the NEAC added Cedar Crest College as an associate member for women's swimming. Beginning in the 2014–15 season, the NEAC accepted two new full members in Bryn Athyn College and Pennsylvania College of Technology. Also in that same season, Wilson College, a former women's college that became co-educational in the 2013–14 school year, began a men's athletic program, and four other schools became men's volleyball associates.

The most recent change in the NEAC membership was announced on August 30, 2017, when Bryn Athyn and Wilson announced that they would leave the NEAC for the Colonial States Athletic Conference effective with the 2018–19 school year.[1] The next change of membership will come in 2019–20 with the return of Penn State Harrisburg[2] and the departure of Saint Elizabeth for the Colonial States Athletic Conference.[3]

Member schools[edit]

Current members[edit]

The league currently has 12 full members. One current member will leave in 2019, while a former member will return at the same time.

The divisional alignment listed here will not apply for 2018–19 following the departure of Bryn Athyn and Wilson, both of which were in the South Division. The NEAC has yet to announce its new alignment.

Institution Location Nickname Founded Type Enrollment Joined
North Division
Cazenovia College Cazenovia, New York Wildcats 1824 Private/Nonsectarian 1,000 2004-05
Keuka College Keuka Park, New York Wolves 1890 Private/Nonsectarian 1,521 2004-05
State University of New York at Cobleskill (SUNY Cobleskill) Cobleskill, New York Fighting Tigers 1916 Public 2,500 2008-09
State University of New York Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) Utica, New York Wildcats 1966 Public 2,760 2008-09
State University of New York at Morrisville (SUNY Morrisville) Morrisville, New York Mustangs 1908 Public 3,356 2009-10
College of Saint Elizabeth Morristown, New Jersey Eagles 1899 Private/Catholic 2,044 2009-10
Wells College Aurora, New York Express 1868 Private/Nonsectarian 480 2007-08
South Division
Gallaudet University Washington, D.C. Bison 1864 Private/Quasigovernmental 1,740 2010-11
Lancaster Bible College Lancaster, Pennsylvania Chargers 1933 Private/Christian 954 2011-12
Pennsylvania College of Technology Williamsport, Pennsylvania Wildcats 1914 Public 5,976 2014-15
Penn State-Abington Abington, Pennsylvania Nittany Lions 1950 Public–private hybrid (CSHE) 3,400 2009-10
Penn State-Berks Reading, Pennsylvania Nittany Lions 1958 Public–private hybrid (CSHE) 3,216 2004-05

† - Formerly a women's-only college. Switching to co-ed during the 2016-2017 season. Men's volleyball begins 2017-2018 season.
* - Provisional member

Associate members[edit]

Institution Location Nickname Founded Type Enrollment Joined Primary
Conference
NEAC Sport(s)
Cedar Crest College Allentown, Pennsylvania Falcons 1867 Private/Catholic 1,885 2013-14 CSAC men's swimming
women's swimming
Hilbert College Hamburg, New York Hawks 1957 Private/Catholic 1,100 2012–13 AMCC men's lacrosse
Medaille College Buffalo, New York Mavericks 1937 Private/Non-sectarian 3,253 2008–09 AMCC men's lacrosse
women's lacrosse
Rutgers University–Camden Camden, New Jersey Scarlet Raptors 1766 Public 6,158 2008-09 NJAC men's golf

Former members[edit]

Most former NEAC members are charter members of the conference. The exceptions are Bryn Athyn, Penn State Harrisburg (set to return in 2019–20), and Wilson.

Institution Location Nickname Founded Type Enrollment Joined Left Current Conference
Bard College Annandale-on-Hudson, New York Raptors 1860 Private 2,062 2004–05 2006–07 Liberty
Bryn Athyn College Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania Lions 1877 Private 256 2014–15 2017–18 CSAC
Cairn University[a] Langhorne, Pennsylvania Highlanders 1913 Private 1,311 2004–05 2007–08 CSAC
Chestnut Hill College Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Griffins 1924 Private 2,000 2004–05 2006–07 CACC
(NCAA Division II)
Clarks Summit University[b] Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania Defenders 1932 Private 963 2004–05 2007–08 CSAC
D'Youville College Buffalo, New York Spartans 1908 Private 3,200 2004–05 2008–09 AMCC
Keystone College La Plume, Pennsylvania Giants 1868 Private 1,773 2004–05 2007–08 CSAC
Penn State-Harrisburg[c] Middletown, Pennsylvania Nittany Lions 1966 Public–private hybrid 1,695 2007–08 2012–13 Capital
New York University Tandon School of Engineering[d] Brooklyn, New York Fighting Blue Jays 1854 Private 4,487 2004–05 2006–07 N/A[e]
State University of New York at Purchase (SUNY Purchase) Purchase, New York Panthers 1967 Public 4,000 2004–05 2006–07 Skyline
Stevenson University[f] Stevenson, Maryland Mustangs 1947 Private 3,929 2004–05 2006–07 MAC Commonwealth
Wilson College[g] Chambersburg, Pennsylvania Phoenix 1869 Private 800 2007–08 2017–18 CSAC
Notes
  1. ^ Cairn was known as Philadelphia Biblical University throughout its tenure in the NEAC. It adopted its current name in 2012.
  2. ^ Clarks Summit was known as Baptist Bible College & Seminary throughout its tenure in the NEAC. The school name was changed to Summit University of Pennsylvania in 2015, and to Clarks Summit University in 2016.
  3. ^ Penn State Harrisburg will return to the NEAC in 2019.
  4. ^ The NYU engineering school was the standalone Polytechnic University while in the NEAC. Polytechnic became affiliated with New York University (NYU) in 2008 as the Polytechnic Institute of New York University (athletically known as NYU Poly), and merged completely into NYU in 2014.
  5. ^ As part of the final merger of NYU Poly with NYU in 2014, Poly's athletics program was merged into that of NYU.
  6. ^ Stevenson was known as Villa Julie College throughout its tenure in the NEAC. It adopted its current name in 2008.
  7. ^ Wilson was a women's-only college when it joined the NEAC. It became coeducational in 2013, and added men's sports in 2014–15, the first school year in which men were allowed to live on campus.

Former associate members[edit]

Institution Location Nickname Founded Type Enrollment Joined Left Primary
Conference
NEAC Sport
University of Dallas Irving, Texas Crusaders 1956 Private/Catholic 2,576 2008-09 2009-10 SCAC various[a]
D'Youville College Buffalo, New York Spartans 1908 Private/Catholic 3,200 2014–15 2016–17 AMCC men's volleyball[b]
Hilbert College Hamburg, New York Hawks 1957 Private/Catholic 1,100 2014–15 2016–17 AMCC men's volleyball[b][c]
Medaille College Buffalo, New York Mavericks 1937 Private/Non-sectarian 3,253 2014–15 2016–17 AMCC men's volleyball[b][d]
Penn State Altoona Altoona, Pennsylvania Nittany Lions 1939 Public-private hybrid
(CSHE)
4,182 2014–15 2016–17 AMCC men's volleyball[b]
Rutgers University–Camden Camden, New Jersey Scarlet Raptors 1766 Public 6,158 2011-12 2013-14 NJAC men's tennis
Notes
  1. ^ Dallas competed in the NEAC for some sports (men's soccer, men's golf, men's & women's cross country, and men's & women's basketball joined from 2008-09 to 2009-10; later men's volleyball in the 2009-10 season).
  2. ^ a b c d The AMCC began sponsoring men's volleyball in the 2017–18 school year.
  3. ^ Hilbert remains a NEAC associate member in men's lacrosse.
  4. ^ Medaille remains a NEAC associate member in men's and women's lacrosse.

Membership timeline[edit]

Pennsylvania College of TechnologyBryn Athyn CollegeLancaster Bible CollegeGallaudet UniversityState University of New York at MorrisvilleCollege of Saint ElizabethPenn State AbingtonState University of New York Polytechnic InstituteState University of New York at CobleskillWilson College (Pennsylvania)Wells CollegePenn State HarrisburgStevenson UniversityState University of New York at PurchaseCairn UniversityPenn State BerksNew York University Tandon School of EngineeringKeystone CollegeKeuka CollegeD'Youville CollegeChestnut Hill CollegeCazenovia CollegeBard CollegeClarks Summit University

Sports[edit]

Men[edit]

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Women[edit]

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CSAC Adds Two New Members for 2018-19" (Press release). Colonial States Athletic Conference. August 30, 2017. Retrieved September 26, 2017. 
  2. ^ "NEAC Welcomes Penn State Harrisburg for 2019-20" (Press release). North Eastern Athletic Conference. July 9, 2018. Retrieved July 11, 2018. 
  3. ^ "CSAC Adds New Member for 2019-20" (Press release). Colonial States Athletic Conference. March 21, 2018. Retrieved July 11, 2018. 

External links[edit]