List of North Korean missile tests

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There have been a number of North Korean missile tests. North Korea has also fired a number of short-range missiles into the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea), in what have been interpreted as political gestures.[1][2][3][4]

Timeline[edit]

  • 1976–81 - North Korea commences its missile development program using Scud-B from the Soviet Union and a launchpad from Egypt.[5]
  • 1984 - First Scud-B missile test firing.[5]
  • 1988 - Operational deployment of Scud-B and Scud-C missiles.[5]
  • 1990 - First Rodong missile test.[5]
  • 1993 North Korean missile test - (May 29/30, 1993) - Nodong
  • 1998 - North Korea fires off its first ballistic missile, the Unha-1 rocket, also known as the Taepodong-1 missile, from the launch site of Musudan-ri in North Hamgyong Province.[6]
  • 1999 - North Korea agrees to a moratorium on long-range missile tests.[7]
  • 2002 - North Korea pledges to extend moratorium on missile tests beyond 2003.
  • 2004 - North Korea reaffirms moratorium.[8]
  • 2005 - North Korea fires short-range missile into Sea of Japan.[9]
  • 2006 North Korean missile test - (July 5, 2006) - Taepodong-2 failed [6]
  • 2009 - Failed orbit of the Kwangmyŏngsŏng-2 satellite aboard an Unha-2 carrier rocket (April 5, 2009)
  • 2009 North Korean missile test (July 4, 2009)
  • 2012 - Failed launch of the Kwangmyŏngsŏng-3 satellite aboard an Unha-3 carrier rocket (April 13, 2012)
  • 2012 - Successful launch of the Kwangmyŏngsŏng-3 Unit 2 satellite aboard a three stage rocket (December 12, 2012)[6]
  • 2013 North Korean missile tests (May 18–20, 2013 - part of 2013 Korean crisis)
  • 2014 North Korean missile tests (March 2014) including Nodong, success[10]
  • 2015- North Korea claims to launch a missile from a submarine (May 2015)[11][6]
  • 2016 - Successful launch of the Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 satellite (Feb. 7, 2016)
  • 2016 - Test of engine designed for an intercontinental ballistic missile (April, 2016)[12]
  • 2016 - North Korea claims to launch a Pukkuksong-1[13] missile capable of striking the United States (August 2016)[14]
  • 2016 - Failed North Korean ballistic missile launch (Oct 15, 2016)- [15]
  • 2016 - Failed launch of a intermediate range missle (Oct 19,2016) - [16]
  • 2017 - North Korea test-fired a Pukguksong-2 missile over the Sea of Japan. This was the first launch of the new medium-range ballistic missile (Feb 11, 2017).[17][18][6]
  • 2017 - North Korea launches four ballistic missiles from the Tongchang-ri launch site in the northwest.[19] Some flew 620 mi (1,000 km) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (March 6, 2017)[20][6]
  • 2017 - North Korea test-fired a medium-range ballistic missile from its eastern port of Sinpo into the Sea of Japan (April 4, 2017)[21][22][6]
  • 2017 - North Korea test-fired an unidentified land-based missile from the naval base in Sinpo but it exploded almost immediately after the takeoff (April 15, 2017).[23][24][25][26]
  • 2017 - North Korea test-fired an unidentified missile from Pukchang airfield (April 28, 2017).[27][28] Missile, believed to be a medium-range[29] KN-17 ballistic missile,[27] falters and breaks apart minutes after liftoff.[29][30]
  • 2017 - North Korea test-fired a Hwasong-12[31] missile from a test site in the area of Kusong (May 13, 2017).[32] The missile, later revealed to be an intermediate range ballistic missile,[33] traveled 30 minutes,[34] reached an altitude of more than 2,111.5 km, and flew a horizontal distance of 789 km (489 miles), before falling into the Sea of Japan.[33] Such a missile would have a range of at least 4,000, reaching Guam, to 6,000 km.[32][31]
  • 2017- North Korea test-fired another Pukguksong-2 medium-range ballistic missile from Pukchang airfield (May 21, 2017),[35][36] which traveled approximately 300 miles before falling into the Sea of Japan.[37] The missile landed about 217 miles from North Korea's east coast.[37]
  • 2017 - North Korea Fired a Short Range Ballistic Missile into the Sea of Japan (May 29, 2017). It traveled 450 km.[38]
  • 2017 - North Korea fired several missiles into the Sea of Japan (June 8, 2017). They are believed to be anti-ship missiles.[39] The South Korean military said the launches show the reclusive regime's "precise targeting capability."
  • 2017 - North Korea tested a new rocket engine that could possibly be fitted to an intercontinental ballistic missile (June 23, 2017).[40]
  • 2017 - North Korea tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile named Hwasong-14 on July 4.[41][42] It launched from the Panghyon Aircraft Factory 8 km southeast of Panghyon Airport.[43] It was aimed straight up at a lofted trajectory and reached more than 2,500 km into space.[44] It landed 37 minutes later,[45] more than 930 km from its launch site,[46] into Japan's exclusive economic zone.[47] Aiming long, the missile would have traveled 7,000-8,000 km or more, reaching Alaska, Hawaii, and maybe Seattle.[45][48][49][50][51] Its operational range would be farther, bringing a 500 kg payload to targets in most of the contiguous United States 9,700 km away.[52][53][54]

2016 events[edit]

On February 7, 2016, roughly a month after an alleged hydrogen bomb test, North Korea claimed to have put a satellite into low Earth orbit. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe had warned the North to not launch the rocket, and if it did and the rocket violated Japanese territory, it would be shot down. Nevertheless, North Korea launched the rocket anyway, claiming the satellite was purely intended for peaceful, scientific purposes. Several nations, including the United States, Japan, and South Korea, have criticized the launch, and despite North Korean claims that the rocket was for peaceful purposes, it has been heavily criticized as an attempt to perform an ICBM test under the guise of a peaceful satellite launch. China also criticized the launch, however urged "the relevant parties" to "refrain from taking actions that may further escalate tensions on the Korean peninsula".[55]

While some North Korean pronouncements have been treated with skepticism and ridicule, analysts are treating the unusual pace of North Korean rocket and nuclear testing in early 2016 quite seriously. Admiral Bill Gortney, head of the North American Aerospace Defense Command, told Congress in March 2016, "It's the prudent decision on my part to assume that [Kim Jong Un] has the capability to miniaturize a nuclear weapon and put it on an ICBM," suggesting a major shift from a few years earlier.[56]

North Korea appeared to launch a missile test from a submarine on 23 April 2016; while the missile only traveled 30 km, one U.S. analyst noted that "North Korea's sub launch capability has gone from a joke to something very serious".[57] North Korea conducted multiple missile tests in 2016.[58]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]