Northeastern Huskies football

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Northeastern Huskies
Northeastern Huskies logo.svg
First season 1932
Last season 2009
Stadium Parsons Field
(Capacity: 7,000)
Field surface Artificial turf
Location Boston, Massachusetts
NCAA division Division I FCS
Conference Colonial Athletic Association
All-time record 289–366–17 (.443)
Bowl record 0–1 (.000)
Conference titles 1 (2002)
Rivalries Boston University Terriers
UMass Minutemen
Colors Red and Black[1]
         
Mascot Paws

The Northeastern Huskies football program were the intercollegiate American football team for Northeastern University located in Boston, Massachusetts. The team competed in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) and were members of the Colonial Athletic Association. The school's first football team was fielded in 1932. Northeastern participated in football from 1932 to 2009, compiling an all-time record of 289–366–17.[2] Citing sparse attendance, numerous losing seasons and the expense to renovate Parsons Field – its football stadium in neighboring Brookline – to an acceptable standard, the university Board of Trustees voted on November 20, 2009, to end the football program. According to president Joseph Aoun, "Leadership requires that we make these choices. This decision allows us to focus on our existing athletic programs." [3]

Notable former players[edit]

Among notable players for Northeastern were Cincinnati Bengals tight end and Pro Bowler Dan Ross; Green Bay Packers lineman and Pro Bowler Sean Jones, Pittsburgh Steelers linesman Keith Willis and Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker Darin Jordan, Miami Dolphins Drafted 4th round 1997, Baltimore Ravens & Arizona Cardinals Offensive Lineman Jerome Daniels; New England Patriots Tight End Matt Lengel, who caught his first career pass for a touchdown December 24, 2016 and won his first Super Bowl on February 5, 2017.

Year-by-year results[edit]

[4]

Conference champions Conference co-champions Division co-champions Bowl game berth^ Shared standing T
Season Head coach Conference Season results Postseason result
Final standings Conference Record Overall Record
Conference Division Wins Loses Ties Wins Loses Ties
Northeastern University Huskies
1933 Alfred M. McCoy Independent 1 3 1
1934 6 1 1
1935 5 0 3
1936 5 4 0
1937 James W. Dunn 4 3 0
1938 3 3 1
1939 0 6 1
1940 2 6 0
1941 4 3 0
1942 Foxy Flumere 0 5 1
1943 Did Not Play – World War II
1944
1945
1946 William Grinnell Independent 3 3 0
1947 1 5 0
1948 Joe Zabilski 1 4 1
1949 3 3 0
1950 3 3 1
1951 6 0 1
1952 4 3 0
1953 6 1 0
1954 4 3 0
1955 4 1 1
1956 3 5 0
1957 1 6 0
1958 6 2 0
1959 1 6 1
1960 2 5 1
1961 4 4 0
1962 5 3 0
1963^ 8 0 0 Lost Eastern Bowl against East Carolina, 6–27
1964 5 3 0
1965 6 2 0
1966 6 2 0
1967 7 1 0
1968 6 3 0
1969 3 6 0
1970 3 5 0
1971 4 5 0
1972 Robert Lyons 6 2 0
1973 3 6 0
1974 6 4 0
1975 3 6 0
1976 2 7 0
1977 3 6 1
1978 6 5 0
1979 3 7 0
1980 2 9 0
1981 Paul Pawlak 3 7 0
1982 3 6 0
1983 6 4 1
1984 3 7 0
1985 2 8 0
1986 4 6 0
1987 6 5 0
1988 4 7 0
1989 3 7 0
1990 1 10 0
1991 Barry Gallup 4 7 0
1992 5 5 1
1993 Yankee 9th 2 6 0 2 9 0
1994 8th 2 6 0 2 9 0
1995 9th 2 6 0 4 7 0
1996 8th 3 5 0 6 5 0
1997 Atlantic 10 3rd 5 3 0 8 3 0
1998 7th 3 5 0 5 6 0
1999 10th 1 7 0 2 9 0
2000 Don Brown 10th 1 7 0 4 7 0
2001 6th 4 5 0 5 6 0
2002† 1st 7 2 0 10 3 0 Lost NCAA First Round against Fordham, 24–29
2003 3rd 6 3 0 8 4 0
2004 Rocky Hager 5th 4 4 0 5 6 0
2005 10th 2 6 0 2 9 0
2006 6th 4 4 0 5 6 0
2007 CAA 9th 5th (North) 2 6 0 3 8 0
2008 10th 6th (North) 1 7 0 2 10 0
2009 8th 5th (North) 3 5 0 3 8 0
Total 290 365 17

Championships[edit]

Conference championships[edit]

Year Conference Coach Overall Record Conference Record
2002 Atlantic 10 Conference (Co-Championship) Don Brown 10–3 7–2
Total conference championships 1

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Graphic Standards Colors". Northeastern University. Retrieved April 1, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Northeastern Historical Data". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved 2012-08-27. 
  3. ^ Andrew Ryan, "Northeastern calls an end to football," Boston Globe, November 23, 2009
  4. ^ http://gonu.com/sports/2013/7/18/GEN_0718133257.aspx