Northern Beaches Council

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Northern Beaches Council
New South Wales
Northern Beaches lga sydney.png
Coordinates33°45′S 151°17′E / 33.750°S 151.283°E / -33.750; 151.283Coordinates: 33°45′S 151°17′E / 33.750°S 151.283°E / -33.750; 151.283
Population252,878 (2016 census)[1] (10th (Australia); 4th (NSW))
 • Density995.6/km2 (2,579/sq mi)
Established12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)
Area254 km2 (98.1 sq mi)
MayorMichael Regan
Council seatCivic Centre, Dee Why
RegionMetropolitan Sydney
State electorate(s)
Federal Division(s)
Northern Beaches Council Logo 2017.png
WebsiteNorthern Beaches Council
LGAs around Northern Beaches Council:
Hornsby Broken Bay Tasman Sea
Ku-ring-gai, Willoughby Northern Beaches Council Tasman Sea
Mosman Sydney Harbour Tasman Sea

The Northern Beaches Council is a local government area located in the Northern Beaches region of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The Council was formed on 12 May 2016 after the amalgamation of Manly, Pittwater and Warringah Councils.[2]

The Council comprises an area of 254 square kilometres (98 sq mi) and as at the 2016 census had an estimated population of 252,878, making it the third most populous local government area in the Sydney region.[1]

The inaugural Mayor of the Northern Beaches Council is Cr. Michael Regan, of the Your Northern Beaches Independent Team, who was elected on 26 September 2017.[3]

Suburbs and localities[edit]

The following suburbs are located within Northern Beaches Council:[2]

The following localities are located within Northern Beaches Council:

  • Akuna Bay
  • Allambie
  • Avalon North
  • Bantry Bay
  • Barrenjoey
  • Bungan Beach
  • Bungan Head
  • Bungaroo
  • Careel Bay
  • Careel Head
  • Clareville Beach
  • Collaroy Beach
  • Cromer Heights
  • Curl Curl Beach
  • Dee Why Beach
  • Fishermans Beach (Collaroy)
  • Foleys Hill
  • Freshwater Beach
  • Gooseberry Flat
  • Ingleside Heights
  • Long Reef Beach (Collaroy)
  • Loquat Valley
  • Narrabeen Beach
  • Narrabeen Peninsula
  • North Curl Curl Beach
  • North Narrabeen Beach
  • Paradise Beach
  • Peach Trees
  • Sand Point
  • Sorlie
  • South Warriewood
  • Stokes Point
  • Taylors Point
  • The Basin
  • Towlers Bay
  • Tumbledown Dick
  • Turimetta
  • Warriewood Beach
  • Wingala

Demographics[edit]

At the 2016 census, there were 252,878 people in the Northern Beaches local government area; of these 48.8 per cent were male and 51.2 per cent were female. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people made up 0.6 per cent of the population; the NSW and Australian averages of 2.9 and 2.8 per cent respectively. The median age of people in Northern Beaches Council was 42 years; the national median is 38 years. Children aged 0 – 14 years made up 19.7 per cent of the population and people aged 65 years and over made up 16.8 per cent of the population. Of people in the area aged 15 years and over, 52.7 per cent were married and 10.7 per cent were either divorced or separated.[1]

At the 2016 census, 68% of residents stated their ancestry as Australian or Anglo-Saxon. 51% nominated a religious affiliation with Christianity, the national average is 52.1%. 18.9% of households speak two or more languages at home; the national average is 22.2 per cent. 79.8% of households only speak English at home; the national average is 72.7 per cent.[1]

Selected historical census data for Northern Beaches Council local government area
Census year 2016[1]
Population Estimated residents on census night 252,878
LGA rank in terms of size within New South Wales 4th
% of New South Wales population 3.38%
% of Australian population 1.08%
Cultural and language diversity
Ancestry,
top responses
English 29.2%
Australian 22.3%
Irish 9.2%
Scottish 7.5%
Italian 3.5%
Language,
top responses
(other than English)
Italian 1.3%
Mandarin 1.3%
Portuguese 1.0%
French 0.9%
German 0.9%
Religious affiliation
Religious affiliation,
top responses
No religion, so described 33.7%
Catholic 24.2%
Anglican 17.8%
Not stated 8.4%
Uniting Church 2.7%
Median weekly incomes
Personal income Median weekly personal income Data
to be
released
in
October
2017
% of Australian median income
Family income Median weekly family income
% of Australian median income
Household income Median weekly household income
% of Australian median income

Council composition[edit]

The head of the Northern Beaches Council from the proclamation was Administrator Dick Persson AM, who remained in office until the election of the new mayor on 26 September 2017.[4] The first meeting of the Northern Beaches Council was held at Manly Town Hall on 19 May 2016 and from then until September 2017, the monthly council meetings cycled between the three former council chambers: Mona Vale Memorial Hall, Warringah Civic Centre in Dee Why and Manly Town Hall. Since September 2017, council meetings are held at the Civic Centre in Dee Why.[5]

Mayor Term Notes
Administrator Dick Persson AM 12 May 2016 – 26 September 2017 Administrator of Warringah 2003–2008 and Port Macquarie-Hastings 2008–2009[4]
Mayor Michael Regan 26 September 2017 – date Mayor of Warringah 2008–2016[3]
Deputy Mayor Sue Heins 25 September 2017 – date Warringah Deputy Mayor 2013–2014
General Manager/CEO[6] Term Notes
Mark Ferguson 12 May 2016 – 6 March 2018 General Manager of Pittwater 2006–2016 and Coffs Harbour 1998–2005[7][8]
Ray Brownlee PSM 1 October 2018 – date General Manager of the City of Randwick 2004–date[9]

Current composition[edit]

The Northern Beaches Council comprises fifteen Councillors elected proportionally, with three Councillors elected in five wards.[4] The Mayor is elected bi-annually by the councillors at the first meeting. The Deputy Mayor is elected annually. On 9 September 2017 the current council was elected for a fixed three-year term of office.

The most recent election was held on 9 September 2017, and the makeup of the Council by order of election is as follows:

Party Councillors
Your Northern Beaches Independent Team 6
Liberal Party of Australia 5
Independent 2
Good for Manly 1
Greens 1
Total 15
Ward Councillor Party Notes
Curl Curl Ward[10] Michael Regan Your Northern Beaches Mayor 2017–date
David Walton Liberal
Natalie Warren Greens
Frenchs Forest Ward[11] Roslyn Harrison Your Northern Beaches Warringah Deputy Mayor 2015–2016
Penny Philpott Your Northern Beaches
Stuart Sprott Liberal
Manly Ward[12] Pat Daley Liberal Manly Councillor 2004–2008, Warringah B Ward Councillor 2012–2016
Candy Bingham Good for Manly Deputy Mayor 2017–2018[3]
Sarah Grattan Your Northern Beaches
Narrabeen Ward[13] Rory Amon Liberal
Sue Heins Your Northern Beaches Deputy Mayor 2018–date, Warringah Deputy Mayor 2013–2014
Vincent De Luca OAM Independent Warringah A Ward Councillor 2008–2016
Pittwater Ward[14] Kylie Ferguson Liberal Pittwater Deputy Mayor 2013–2016
Alex McTaggart Independent Mayor of Pittwater 2005–2007
Ian White Your Northern Beaches Pittwater Deputy Mayor 2011–2012

History[edit]

Warringah Shire Hall in 1954 with the Mackellar County Council offices to the left.

Early history[edit]

The traditional Aboriginal inhabitants of the land now known as the northern beaches were the Kuringgai people of the Eora nation.[15] Within a few years of European settlement, the Kuringgai had mostly disappeared from this area[citation needed] mainly due to an outbreak of smallpox in 1789. Much evidence of their habitation remains especially their rock etchings in Kuring-gai Chase National Park which borders northern beaches's north-western side. The northern beaches region was explored early on in the settlement of Sydney, only a few weeks after the arrival of the First Fleet. However, it remained a rural area for most of the 19th and early 20th centuries, with only small settlements in the valleys between headlands. While it was geographically close to the city centre, to reach the area over land from Sydney via Mona Vale Road was a trip of more than 100 kilometres (62 mi).

Local government history[edit]

The Municipality of Manly was first incorporated on 6 January 1877, being the first local government authority on the Northern Beaches. On 7 March 1906, the Warringah Shire was proclaimed by the NSW Government Gazette, along with 132 other new Shires. It ran roughly from Broken Bay in the north to Manly Lagoon to the south, and by Middle Harbour Creek and Cowan Creek in the west. It covered 264 square kilometres (102 sq mi) and had a population of around 2800, with 700 dwellings.[16] From 1951 to 1980, the Mackellar County Council operated on the Northern Beaches as an electricity and gas supplier and retailer as a joint operation of Manly Municipal Council and Warringah Shire Council.[17] Amalgamation of Manly and Warringah councils to form one council for the Northern Beaches was recommended in the final report of the 1945–46 Clancy Royal Commission on Local Government Boundaries, but was not proceeded with in the act passed in 1948.[18]

On 2 May 1992, The Governor of New South Wales proclaimed the establishment of the Municipality of Pittwater, the area of which roughly followed the area formerly known as ‘A’ Riding of the Warringah Shire.[16] On 1 July 1993, with the enactment of a new Local Government Act 1993, the municipalities of Manly and Pittwater were renamed "Manly Council" and "Pittwater Council" and Warringah Shire Council became "Warringah Council".[19]

Establishment of Northern Beaches Council[edit]

Manly Town Hall, the site of the first meeting of the new council on 19 May 2016.

In 2015 a review of local government boundaries by the NSW Government Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal recommended that Manly, Pittwater and Warringah merge to form one single council. The government eventually considered three proposals. The first proposed a merger of Manly and Mosman councils and parts of Warringah to form a new council with an area of 49 square kilometres (19 sq mi) and support a population of approximately 153,000.[20] The second proposed a merger of Pittwater Council and parts of Warringah to form a new council with an area of 214 square kilometres (83 sq mi) and support a population of approximately 141,000.[21]

The third proposal, submitted by Warringah Council on 23 February 2016, was for an amalgamation of the Pittwater, Manly and Warringah councils.[22][23] Of the 44,919 submissions lodged to the Boundaries Commission about all the local government proposals statewide, 29,189 were from Northern Beaches residents (18,977 were submitted for the third proposal); this meant that the Northern Beaches proposals made up 65% of all submissions. Former Warringah mayor, Michael Regan, noted to the Manly Daily that this was an indication of the level of interest in the Northern Beaches over the future of their local government: "given the choice of splitting the northern beaches or uniting it the community opted for unity", while former Manly mayor, Jean Hay, commented that this interest translated into the final result: "Everyone is passionate about the area and we came out and let the powers-that-be know, [...] It must have made an impact because the minister and the premier looked at what the community told them and it was the majority decision to go with a single council."[24]

On 12 May 2016, with the release of the Local Government (Council Amalgamations) Proclamation 2016, the Northern Beaches Council was formed from Manly, Pittwater and Warringah councils.[4] The first meeting of the Northern Beaches Council was held at Manly Town Hall on 19 May 2016. Several advisory committees were established at the council's first meeting to advise the Administrator and the Council on implementation matters, composed of former councillors and mayors of the three councils. These included Manly Mayor Jean Hay as Chair of the Implementation Advisory Group and Chair of the Social Committee, Warringah Mayor Michael Regan as Chair of the Economic Committee and Pittwater Deputy Mayor Kylie Ferguson as Chair of the Environment Committee.[25]

Heritage listings[edit]

The Northern Beaches Council has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

In Avalon
In Balgowlah
In Clareville
In Currawong Beach
In Killarney Heights
In Manly
In Manly Vale
In Palm Beach

[edit]

In July 2017 the new council logo was unveiled by CEO Mark Ferguson at the cost of $320,000: "It was necessary to have something that was a reflection of the Northern Beaches Council looking to the future and having it based on a strong level of community participation." The logo was developed as a result of a consultation process with community groups and council staff to ascertain a representative image for the unified council. The logo takes the form of a stylised wave made up of various images including local flora and fauna such as a humpback whale, a Norfolk pine and cabbage-tree palm, a pelican and a weedy seadragon.[39][40]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Northern Beaches (A)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 5 July 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ a b "Northern Beaches Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Patterson, Robbie (27 September 2017). "Michael Regan highlights focus on key infrastructure projects after being elected the northern beaches first mayor". Manly Daily. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d "Page 25 Local Government (Council Amalgamations) Proclamation 2016 [NSW] - Schedule 13 - Provisions for Northern Beaches Council" (PDF). Parliament of New South Wales. 2012. p. 25. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  5. ^ "Council Meetings". Northern Beaches Council. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  6. ^ Chief Executive Officer from January 2017.
  7. ^ "Northern Beaches Council CEO Mark Ferguson steps down from role" (Media Release). Northern beaches Council. 7 March 2018. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  8. ^ "MAYORAL MINUTE NO 03/2018" (PDF). Minutes of Extraordinary Council Meeting. Northern Beaches Council. 6 March 2018. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  9. ^ "Ray Brownlee appointed new Chief Executive Officer" (Media Release). Northern Beaches Council. 17 July 2018. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  10. ^ "Northern Beaches - Curl Curl Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  11. ^ "Northern Beaches - Frenchs Forest Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  12. ^ "Northern Beaches - Manly Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  13. ^ "Northern Beaches - Narrabeen Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  14. ^ "Northern Beaches - Pittwater Ward". NSW Local Council Elections 2017. NSW Electoral Commission. Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  15. ^ "Guringai history". Services. Guringai Tribal Link Aboriginal Corporation. 2010. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  16. ^ a b "About Council > Council History". www.warringah.nsw.gov.au. Warringah Council. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  17. ^ "3488 Mackellar County Council". State Records Archives Investigator. NSW State Records. Archived from the original on 3 February 2016. Retrieved 15 January 2016.
  18. ^ ""COMPLACENCY" ABOUT LOCAL GOVERNMENT ALLEGED". The Sydney Morning Herald (33, 814). New South Wales, Australia. 9 May 1946. p. 5. Retrieved 2 November 2017 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1993". New South Wales Consolidated Acts. Australasian Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  20. ^ "Merger proposal: Manly Council, Mosman Municipal Council, Warringah Council (part)" (PDF). Government of New South Wales. January 2016. p. 8. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  21. ^ "Merger proposal: Pittwater Council, Warringah Council (part)" (PDF). Government of New South Wales. January 2016. p. 8. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  22. ^ Warringah Council (23 February 2016). "Manly, Pittwater and Warringah councils Proposal" (PDF). Government of New South Wales. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 March 2016. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  23. ^ Kembrey, Melanie; Robertson, James (27 February 2016). "Northern Beaches mega council back on the table after merger 'loophole' discovered". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 28 February 2016.
  24. ^ Morcombe, John (23 May 2016). "Peninsula lodges 65 per cent of all NSW responses to council amalgamation plans". The Manly Daily. Retrieved 1 June 2016.
  25. ^ Morcombe, John (20 May 2016). "Former councillors to return in advisory capacity". The Manly Daily.
  26. ^ "Walter Burley Griffin Lodge". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01510. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  27. ^ "Loggan Rock". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01779. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  28. ^ "Substation". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00936. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  29. ^ "Hy Brasil". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00079. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  30. ^ "Currawong Workers' Holiday Camp". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01784. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  31. ^ "Bantry Bay Explosives Depot". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00977. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  32. ^ "St. Patricks Estate". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01724. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  33. ^ "North Head Quarantine Station & Reserve". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01003. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  34. ^ "Manly Cove Pavilion". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01433. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  35. ^ "Manly Wharf". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01434. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  36. ^ "Substation". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00938. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  37. ^ "Manly Dam". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H01327. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  38. ^ "Barrenjoey Head Lightstation". New South Wales State Heritage Register. Office of Environment and Heritage. H00979. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  39. ^ "Community Unveil New Northern Beaches Identity" (Media Release). Northern Beaches Council. 26 July 2017. Retrieved 23 September 2017.
  40. ^ Patterson, Robbie (2 August 2017). "Northern Beaches Council spends $320k on new 'identity' including logo and website". Manly Daily. Retrieved 23 September 2017.

External links[edit]