Northern State Correctional Facility

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Northern State Correctional Facility
Seal of the Vermont Department of Corrections.jpg
Location2559 Glen Road, Newport, Orleans County, Vermont, USA
Coordinates44°54′24″N 72°11′26″W / 44.906757°N 72.1905832°W / 44.906757; -72.1905832
StatusOperational
Security classMedium
Capacity433
Population417 (as of FY2010[1])
Opened1994

The Northern State Correctional Facility (NSCF) is a state prison in the city of Newport, Orleans County, Vermont, USA. It holds up to 433 medium security male prisoners[2] and is the largest prison in Vermont.[3] The Vermont Department of Corrections is responsible for running this prison.

A branch of the Community High School of Vermont is located there. It is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. It graduated 13 men in 2007.[4]

In 2008, the budget for the facility was $10 million.[5] The total expenditures for Fiscal Year 2010 were $16,698,753.[1]

In 2013, the superintendent named four gangs prevalent among the prisoners: the Crips, the Bloods, the Aryan Nation, and, a local gang, the Chittenden County White Boys. He indicated that Vermont is not violent and the local culture prevails with minimum conflict among the gangs.[6]

Media[edit]

The prisoners formed a theater group which they named "The Usual Suspects."[citation needed]

In 2011, Muslim inmates complained that their religious needs were not being met during Ramadan. This made national news.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b [1] Archived June 30, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Welcome to" (PDF). Motoruponline.com. Retrieved 2014-01-30.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-07-22. Retrieved 2014-01-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Gresser, Joseph (May 2, 2007). Prisoners earn diplomas. the Chronicle.
  5. ^ Gresser, Joseph (June 4, 2008). State outlines new prison policy. the Chronicle.
  6. ^ Gresser, Joseph (January 23, 2014). "Departing superintendent offers a tour of prison". The Chronicle. Barton, Vermont. p. 14.
  7. ^ "Jailed Muslims say beliefs not met". Florida Today. Melbourne, Florida. November 29, 2011. pp. 10A. Archived from the original on December 1, 2011.

External links[edit]