Northwest Regional style

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
A Northwest Regional style house in the Matthews Beach neighborhood of Seattle.

Northwest Regional style architecture is an architectural style popular in the Pacific Northwest between 1935 and 1960.[1] It is a regional variant of the International style.[1] It is defined by the extensive use of unpainted wood in both interiors and exteriors.[1] Other features of the style include integration of the building with its setting through asymmetrical floor plans, extensive use of glass extending to the floor, a low-pitched or flat roof of shingles with overhanging eaves, and a minimum of decoration.[1] It is sometimes known as Northwest Modern.

The style was developed by architects including Paul Thiry in Seattle[2] and John Yeon in Oregon, and was used most often in residential buildings.[1][3] Other proponents of the style included Paul Hayden Kirk,[4] Pietro Belluschi, John Storrs, Van Evera Bailey, Herman Brookman, and Saul Zaik.[3][5]

Notable examples[edit]

Paul Thiry's Northeast Branch Library in Seattle

Some examples of Northwest Regional style include the Harry F. Wentz Studio on the Oregon coast; Museum of Contemporary Craft, John Yeon Speculative House, Aubrey R. Watzek House, Zion Lutheran Church and the Visitors Information Center in Portland; and the Northeast Branch Library by Thiry,[6] and University Unitarian Church in Seattle.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Glossary of Architectural Terms". Oregon Historical Society. Retrieved November 5, 2017.
  2. ^ Clausen, Meredith L. (1998). "Paul Thiry". In Ochsner, Jeffrey Karl. Shaping Seattle Architecture: A Historical Guide to the Architects. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press. pp. 246–251. ISBN 0295973668.
  3. ^ a b "International Style, Northwest Style, Cryptic Style: 1940-Present: International Style, Northwest Regional Style". Oregon Historical Society. Retrieved November 5, 2017.
  4. ^ Rash, David A. (1998). "Paul Hayden Kirk". In Ochsner, Jeffrey Karl. Shaping Seattle Architecture: A Historical Guide to the Architects. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press. pp. 252–257. ISBN 0295973668.
  5. ^ Schwartz, Todd (Spring 2010). "The Arc of the Architect". Oregon Quarterly.
  6. ^ Woodridge, Sally B.; Roger Montgomery (1980). A Guide to Architecture in Washington State. University of Washington Press. p. 128. ISBN 0-295-95779-4.

External links[edit]