Nothing Can Change This Love

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"Nothing Can Change This Love"
Single by Sam Cooke
from the album Mr. Soul
A-side "Somebody Have Mercy"
Released September 11, 1962
Format 7"
Recorded August 23, 1962
RCA Studio 1
(Hollywood, California)
Genre Rhythm and blues, soul
Length 2:33
Label RCA Victor
Writer(s) Sam Cooke
Producer(s) Hugo & Luigi
Sam Cooke singles chronology
"Bring It on Home to Me"
(1962)
"Nothing Can Change This Love"
(1962)
"Send Me Some Lovin'"
(1962)

"Nothing Can Change This Love" is a song by American singer-songwriter Sam Cooke, released on September 11, 1962 by RCA Victor. Produced by Hugo & Luigi and arranged and conducted by René Hall, the song was the B-side to "Somebody Have Mercy". The song peaked at number two on Billboard‍‍ '​‍s Hot R&B Singles chart, and also charted at number 12 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Background[edit]

Cooke had first attempted to record "Nothing Can Change This Love" in an earlier session on February 15, 1962, with a decidedly more doo-wop flair.[1] Recorded the night before he was to return to the road for tours, Cooke was determined to record the song, but was unable to get into the RCA studio until past midnight.[2] The song was recorded in eight takes.[2]

RCA issued the song as a single two and a half weeks later, and its sales rivaled that of Cooke's most recent success, "Bring It on Home to Me".[2]

Personnel[edit]

"Nothing Can Change This Love" was recorded on August 23, 1962 at RCA Studio 1 in Hollywood, California.[1] The session was conducted and arranged by René Hall. The musicians also recorded "I'm Gonna Forget About You" the same day. Credits adapted from the liner notes to the 2003 compilation Portrait of a Legend: 1951–1964.[1]

Charts and certifications[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1962) Peak
position
US Billboard Hot 100[3] 12
US Hot R&B Singles (Billboard)[3] 2

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Portrait of a Legend: 1951–1964 (liner notes). Sam Cooke. US: ABKCO Records. 2003. 92642. 
  2. ^ a b c Guralnick, Peter (2005). Dream Boogie: The Triumph of Sam Cooke. New York: Back Bay Books, p. 421–22. First edition, 2005.
  3. ^ a b "Sam Cooke – Awards". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved February 28, 2014. 

External links[edit]