Notting Hill and Ealing High School

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Notting Hill and Ealing High School
Notting Hill and Ealing High School logo.svg
Address
2 Cleveland Road

,
London
,
W13 8AX

England
Coordinates51°31′17″N 0°18′58″W / 51.5214°N 0.3160°W / 51.5214; -0.3160Coordinates: 51°31′17″N 0°18′58″W / 51.5214°N 0.3160°W / 51.5214; -0.3160
Information
TypeIndependent day school
Established1873
Local authorityEaling
Department for Education URN101954 Tables
HeadMr Matthew Shoults
GenderGirls
Age4 to 18
Enrolment880
Colour(s)Blue, Red
         
Website

Notting Hill and Ealing High School is an independent school for girls aged 4 – 18 in Ealing, London. Founded in 1873, it is one of the 26 schools that make up the Girls' Day School Trust. It has a Junior Department of 310 girls (ages 4–11) and a Senior Department of 570 girls (ages 11–18).[1] The current Head is Mr M Shoults.[2]

History[edit]

Since being founded in 1873, the school has changed both its location and its name. When the Girls' Day School Trust, then the Girls' Public Day School Trust, was formed in 1872, it established its first two schools in West London. In January 1873, the Trust opened Chelsea High School (a predecessor of Kensington Preparatory School) to serve the area immediately to the west of the centre of the city and nine months later, Notting Hill High School which was to serve families in the area to the north of Hyde Park.[citation needed]

The school originally occupied premises in Norland Square but eventually outgrew these and moved to Ealing in 1931 and became known as Notting Hill and Ealing High School for Girls. Following the Education Act 1944 it became a direct grant grammar school in 1946.[3] When the direct grant scheme was abolished in 1976, it became an independent school.[4]

Buildings[edit]

The site of the school included one of the large houses common to this part of Ealing. The house was converted to form the centre of the new school – entrance hall, headmistress's study, library and some classrooms. Over the past seventy years remodelling has transformed the interior but there are still features of the original hall and rooms and the entrance steps remain the same as in 1931. Later additions to the site include further classrooms and science block. In 2003 a music recital hall and associated music facilities were added along with an indoor swimming pool, located in a building called 'The West Wing'. This building also includes an art department, as well as the school's English and music Department. In 2010, the new Sixth Form Centre opened and in summer 2013 new facilities including a multi-purpose hall for assemblies and events, 4-court sports hall built to Sports England standard, 100-seat studio theatre and drama workshop area, dance studio and all-weather courts and pitch were opened.

Present day[edit]

The school numbers 878 girls in 2013/14. Entry to the school is by interview or examination normally at ages 4+, 7+, 11+ or 16+ The school has a strong academic tradition. In 2013, 92% of grades at GCSE were A* or A. At A Level 70% of A level grades were A*, A and 92% were A*/ A/ B. In 2013 the Junior School was placed in the top 5 among UK preparatory schools in the Sunday Times Parent Power Survey. Former pupils keep in touch with each other through the Old Girls' Association.

School Fees, Scholarships and Bursaries[edit]

In 2014/15 fees are £4,083 per term (Junior School) and £5,250 per term (Senior School). Academic scholarships and Music Scholarships are awarded at 11+ and 16+ and there are further scholarships at 16+. Means tested bursaries are awarded in the senior school only.

The 2018 annual senior school fees are around £18,000

Notable former pupils[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ site., Who made this. "Senior School Staff – Notting Hill and Ealing High School". Notting Hill and Ealing High School. Retrieved 26 November 2016.
  2. ^ "Senior School Staff – Notting Hill and Ealing High School". Nhehs.gdst.net. Retrieved 21 February 2017.
  3. ^ http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/1946/may/31/grammar-schools-direct-grant-status |chapter-url= missing title (help). Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons. 31 May 1946. col. 234W–234W.
  4. ^ http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/1976/jan/26/direct-grant-schools |chapter-url= missing title (help). Parliamentary Debates (Hansard). House of Commons. 26 January 1976. col. 54W–54W.
  5. ^ "Achieng Ajulu-Bushell, Great Britain". BBC Sport. BBC. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Sayers, Jane E (1973). The Fountain Unsealed: A History of the Notting Hill and Ealing High School. Welwyn Garden City: The Broadwater Press Limited. ISBN 978-0950306308.
  7. ^ Anon (2019). Arnold, Prof. Polly Louise. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who (online Oxford University Press ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. closed access publication – behind paywall (subscription required)
  8. ^ a b c d e f "Vote 100 at NHEHS". Notting Hill & Ealing High School GDST. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  9. ^ "Notting Hill & Ealing High School 1949". Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  10. ^ "Notting Hill & Ealing alumnae shine in the Limelight". Girls' Day School Trust. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  11. ^ Nancy Carpentier Brown, The Woman Who Was Chesterton (Charlotte, NC, 2015).
  12. ^ Baker, Malcolm. "Esdaile [née McDowall], Katharine Ada". ODNB. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  13. ^ a b "Alumnae News". Notting Hill and Ealing High School GDST. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  14. ^ a b Flett, Kathryn (26 Aug 2001). "Please, Miss, I'm back". The Observer.
  15. ^ "Register of Pupils 1890–1908" (PDF). Notting Hill & Ealing High School GDST. p. 140.
  16. ^ "Lynne Frederick". IMDB.
  17. ^ "NHEHS School Magazine 2000" (PDF). Notting Hill & Ealing High School GDST. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  18. ^ "Author and alumna Jamila Gavin returns to Notting Hill & Ealing High for World Book Day". Girls' Day School Trust. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  19. ^ "Papers of Joyce Grenfell and Virginia Graham". Lucy Cavendish College Archives, University of Cambridge. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  20. ^ "NHEHS School Magazine 2000". Notting Hill and Ealing High School GDST. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  21. ^ "NHEHS School Magazine 1989". Notting Hill & Ealing High School GDST. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  22. ^ a b c "Notable Alumnae". Girls' Day School Trust. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  23. ^ "NHEHS School Magazine 2010". Notting Hill & Ealing High School GDST. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  24. ^ Brook, Donald (1948). Violinists Of Today. London: Salibury Square. pp. 91–93.
  25. ^ Caldwell, Dave (2 May 2017). "How Rebecca Lowe went from England to become the US's face of football". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  26. ^ "NHEHS School Magazine 1990". Notting Hill & Ealing High School. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  27. ^ "NHEHS School Magazine 1939". Notting Hill & Ealing High School GDST. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  28. ^ Culbertson, Alix. "The BRITs: Chiswick's Hannah Reid hoping to grab an award with London Grammar". GetWestLondon. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  29. ^ "Obituary – Dame Angela Rumbold". The Daily Telegraph. 21 Jun 2010. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  30. ^ "NHEHS School Magazine 1955". Notting Hill & Ealing High School GDST. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  31. ^ Lucy Hume (5 October 2017). People of Today 2017. Debrett's. p. 1893. ISBN 978-1-9997670-3-7. Retrieved 27 February 2018.

External links[edit]