Nouveau Stade de Bordeaux

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Matmut Atlantique
Matmut Atlantique logo.png
Grand Stade de Bordeaux 2014-11-16.jpg
Location Bordeaux, France
Capacity 41,458[1]
Surface PlayMaster hybrid grass by Tarkett Sports
Construction
Broke ground 2013
Opened 18 May 2015
Construction cost €168 million
Architect Herzog & de Meuron
Tenants
FC Girondins de Bordeaux (2015–)

The Nouveau Stade de Bordeaux, currently also known as the Matmut Atlantique for sponsorship purposes,[2] is a football stadium in Bordeaux, France. It is the home of Ligue 1 club FC Girondins de Bordeaux and seats 41,458 spectators.

History[edit]

Construction began in 2014 and ended in April 2015. The stadium was opened on 18 May 2015. The first match was Bordeaux against Montpellier on 23 May 2015, the final day of the league season. The hosts won 2–1, with both goals by Diego Rolan.[3]

The stadium also hosted the semi-finals of the 2014–15 Top 14 season in rugby union,[4] and also hosted five matches in UEFA Euro 2016, including one quarter-final.

On 7 September 2015, it hosted the France national team in a 2–1 friendly win over Serbia.[5]

In September 2016, the ground was chosen as the host of the 2018 Coupe de la Ligue Final as part of plans to host the event at various venues outside of Paris.[6]

French-Canadian singer, Céline Dion, performed the first concert at the stadium on 29 June 2017.[7]

The stadium was listed as one of six to host football in Paris' bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics, which was chosen in July 2017.[8]

In November 2017, after the French bid won, the stadium was confirmed as one of nine to host the 2023 Rugby World Cup.[9]

UEFA Euro 2016 matches[edit]

Date Time (CET) Team #1 Result Team #2 Round Attendance
11 June 2016 18:00  Wales 2–1  Slovakia Group B 37,831
14 June 2016 18:00  Austria 0–2  Hungary Group F 34,424
18 June 2016 15:00  Belgium 3–0  Republic of Ireland Group E 39,493
21 June 2016 21:00  Croatia 2–1  Spain Group D 37,245
2 July 2016 21:00  Germany 1–1 (6–5 p)  Italy Quarter-finals 38,764

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.lfp.fr/ligue1/affluences/club
  2. ^ "France: Bordeaux stadium signs naming rights deal – StadiumDB.com". 
  3. ^ Guidicelli, Franck (23 May 2015). "BORDEAUX FÊTE SON ENTRÉE DANS SON NOUVEAU STADE EN BATTANT MONTPELLIER" (in French). Football 365. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  4. ^ "TOP 14, les demi-finales 2015 à Bordeaux" (Press release) (in French). Ligue nationale de rugby. 1 December 2014. Retrieved 3 December 2014. 
  5. ^ Crossan, David (7 September 2015). "Matuidi makes difference as France edge Serbia". UEFA. Retrieved 7 September 2015. 
  6. ^ "Coupe de la Ligue - Finale à Lyon en 2017, Bordeaux en 2018 et Lille en 2019". Le Parisien (in French). 1 September 2016. Retrieved 15 September 2017. 
  7. ^ "En images. Céline Dion a assuré le show au Matmut Atlantique de Bordeaux" [In pictures. Céline Dion put on a show as expected at Bordeaux's Matmut Atlantique]. Sud-Ouest (in French). 30 June 2017. Retrieved 28 July 2018. 
  8. ^ "Stade de Bordeaux". Paris 2024. Retrieved 28 July 2018. 
  9. ^ "The 9 stadiums for 2023 RWC in France". Sport 24. 15 November 2017. Retrieved 28 July 2018. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Parc Olympique Lyonnais
Lyon
Coupe de la Ligue
Final Venue

2017–18
Succeeded by
Stade Pierre-Mauroy
Lille

Coordinates: 44°53′50″N 0°33′42″W / 44.89722°N 0.56167°W / 44.89722; -0.56167