Nova Scotia Mass Choir

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The Nova Scotia Mass Choir is a Canadian choral ensemble based in Halifax, Nova Scotia.[1] The choir performs mainly black gospel music, and focuses on spreading the message of racial harmony.

History[edit]

The Nova Scotia Mass Choir was founded in 1992. In 1993 they performed in Washington, D.C., at a concert in memory of Martin Luther King.[2]

In 1995 the choir performed with Oliver Jones in Halifax.[3] That year they released an album on the Jongleur label.[4]

By 1998 the choir had 63 members.[5]

The Nova Scotia Mass Choir has performed locally, nationally and internationally, and has won two East Coast Music Awards.[6] The choir reaches audiences that would not normally be exposed to the genre of black gospel music, and showcases the cultural contributions of African Nova Scotians.[7]

The choir's repertoire features compositions by well-known local composers and musical directors as well as choir members themselves.[8] The group also performs arrangements of traditional gospel and folk music.[9]

Several times a year, the Mass Choir gives benefit concerts in support of racial harmony and to assist various charitable causes, and performs an annual concert to commemorate Martin Luther King[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sparkle, dresses, jeans and smiles adorn ECMA red carpet", Chronicle Herald,By ANDREA NEMETZ March 11, 2013
  2. ^ "Past, present, future combine as Nova Scotia Mass Choir kicks off 25th year". Local Xpress, Jan 13, 2017 by: Andrea Nemetz
  3. ^ Marthe Sansregret (1 January 2006). Oliver Jones. Dundurn. pp. 263, 346. ISBN 978-1-77070-666-8. 
  4. ^ Larry LeBlanc (6 April 1996). Jazz Singer Jeri Brown off to 'Fresh Start'. Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. pp. 80–. ISSN 0006-2510. 
  5. ^ Larry LeBlanc (6 June 1998). "Maritimers Show African Edge". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.: 70–. ISSN 0006-2510. 
  6. ^ a b "Choir leader helps keep King’s dream alive at tribute", Chronicle Herald, By ANDREA NEMETZ January 17, 2013
  7. ^ Anthony Appiah; Henry Louis Gates (2005). Africana: Aardvark-Catholic. Oxford University Press. p. 727. ISBN 978-0-19-522325-5. 
  8. ^ Suzanne Pasternak. The Story of the 1917 Halifax Explosion and the Boston Tree. FriesenPress. pp. 19–. ISBN 978-1-5255-0182-1. 
  9. ^ Merna Forster (7 September 2011). 100 More Canadian Heroines: Famous and Forgotten Faces. Dundurn. pp. 108–. ISBN 978-1-4597-0086-4. 

External links[edit]