November 1938

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The following events occurred in November 1938:

November 1, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

November 2, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

November 3, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

November 4, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

November 5, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

November 6, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

November 7, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

November 8, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

November 9, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Kristallnacht: A wave of violence targeting Jews occurred throughout Germany and Austria in retaliation for the assassination of Ernst vom Rath. Nazi authorities did not interfere as Jewish shops and synagogues were burned and looted, but 20,000 Jews were arrested. The vast amounts of broken glass littering the streets outside the Jewish shops gave the night its name.[6]
  • Swiss citizen Maurice Bavaud attended a parade in Munich celebrating the 15th anniversary of the Beer Hall Putsch with the intention of assassinating Adolf Hitler with a pistol. However, Hitler marched on the far side of the street relative to Bavaud's position making the shot too difficult, so he abandoned his attempt.[7]
  • The Cole Porter stage musical Leave It to Me! opened at the Imperial Theatre on Broadway.[8]
  • Died: Vasily Blyukher, 48, Soviet military commander (killed in the Great Purge); Ernst vom Rath, 29, German diplomat (shot)

November 10, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

November 11, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

November 12, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

November 13, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

November 14, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

November 15, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • All Jewish children were banned from German public schools.[11]
  • U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt read a statement to the media strongly condemning the persecution of Jews in Germany and announcing that he had recalled the American ambassador to Germany.[15]
  • Italy ordered the removal of all books by Jewish authors from schools.[6]
  • Died: André Blondel, 75, French engineer and physicist

November 16, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

November 17, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

November 18, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

  • 3,500 members of the motion picture industry attended a "Quarantine Hitler" rally at the Philharmonic Auditorium in Los Angeles. John Garfield, Frank Capra, Joan Crawford and Thomas Mann were among the participants. The crowd unanimously voted to send a telegram to President Roosevelt urging him to use his authority to "express further the horror and the indignation of the American people" at the Nazi persecutions of Jews and Catholics.[19]

November 19, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

November 20, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Japanese authorities notified foreign powers that the Han River in China was closed to navigation without "special permission".[20]
  • Died: Maud of Wales, 68, Queen of Norway

November 21, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

November 22, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Hungary ordered the expulsion of Czechoslovaks from the territory occupied after the Vienna Award.[22]

November 23, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

November 24, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

November 25, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

November 26, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

November 27, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Édouard Daladier gave a radio address to the French people saying he would use all means necessary to break up the scheduled general strike and claiming that the labour agitation was a plot to set up a leftist dictatorship.[31]
  • Chicago White Sox pitcher Monty Stratton accidentally shot himself in the leg while hunting rabbits on his mother's farm near Greenville, Texas. He never played in the majors again.[32]

Frank Sinatra was arrested by the Bergen County Sheriff's Office. Sinatra was arrested for carrying on with a married woman, a criminal offense at the time.

November 28, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

November 29, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

November 30, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The French general strike fizzled with only a few workers participating, but many labour leaders were arrested.[2]
  • Members of the Italian Chamber of Fasci and Corporations demanded that France turn over Corsica and Tunisia to Italy.[2]
  • Emil Hácha became 3rd President of Czechoslovakia.
  • Nazi leaders were instructed to have flowers held by onlookers confiscated by security wherever Hitler's motorcade was about to pass through. The Nazis had been trying unsuccessfully for years to discourage the practice of throwing flowers at Hitler because it was feared that an assassin could throw a bouquet containing a bomb.[36]
  • Henry Ford issued a statement urging that Germany's persecuted Jews be allowed to come to the United States. "I believe that the United States cannot fail at this time to maintain its traditional role as a haven for the oppressed", Ford's statement read. "I am convinced not only that this country could absorb many of the victims of oppression who must find a refuge outside of their native lands, but that as many of them as could be admitted under our selective quota would constitute a real asset to our country."[37]
  • Died: Corneliu Zelea Codreanu, 39, Romanian far right politician

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Seabiscuit Wins; Breaks Record at Pimlico". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 2, 1938. p. 23.
  2. ^ a b c d "Chronology 1938". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  3. ^ Wu, T'ien-Wei. "Contending Political Forces." China's Bitter Victory: The War with Japan, 1937–1945. Ed. James C. Hsiung & Steven I. Levine. New York: M. E. Sharpe, Inc. 1992. p. 67. ISBN 9780765636324.
  4. ^ "November 4, 1938". PlaneCrashInfo. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  5. ^ "Hungary Takes Czech Sector". Brooklyn Eagle. November 5, 1938. p. 1.
  6. ^ a b c d "1938". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  7. ^ a b Thomsett, Michael C. (1997). The German Opposition to Hitler: The Resistance, the Underground, and Assassination Plots, 1938–1945. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. pp. 96–97. ISBN 9780786403721.
  8. ^ "Leave It to Me!". Playbill Vault. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  9. ^ "Tageseinträge für 11. November 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  10. ^ Small, Alex (November 12, 1938). "Windsor Again Wins Favor of British Royalty". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  11. ^ a b c "Antisemitic Legislation 1933–1939". Holocaust Encyclopedia. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  12. ^ a b Cymet, David (2010). History vs. Apologetics: The Holocaust, the Third Reich, and the Catholic Church. Plymouth: Lexington Books. pp. 123, 155. ISBN 9780739132951.
  13. ^ Kowal, Barry (December 7, 2014). "Your Hit Parade (USA) Weekly Single Charts From 1938". Hits of All Decades. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  14. ^ "Tageseinträge für 13. November 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  15. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (November 16, 1938). "President Rips into Nazis for Harassing Jews". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  16. ^ a b "Haunts of the Halifax Slasher". 2ubh. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  17. ^ Wilson, Christopher S. (2013). Beyond Anitkabir: The Funerary Architecture of Atatürk. Ashgate. ISBN 9781472416896.
  18. ^ Friedrich, Jörg (2006). The Fire: The Bombing of Germany, 1940–1945. Columbia University Press. p. 215. ISBN 9780231133814.
  19. ^ Doherty, Thomas (2007). Hollywood's Censor: Joseph I. Breen and the Production Code Administration. Columbia University Press. p. 210. ISBN 9780231143592.
  20. ^ "Japs Close Han River in China to Foreign Ships". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 21, 1938. p. 7.
  21. ^ "British Move to Open Guiana Haven to Jews". Brooklyn Eagle. November 21, 1938. p. 1.
  22. ^ "Czechs Ousted by Hungary". Brooklyn Eagle. November 22, 1938. p. 1.
  23. ^ "The Boys from Syracuse". Playbill Vault. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  24. ^ "44 Die as Snowstorm, Gale Lash Coast". Brooklyn Eagle. November 25, 1938. p. 1.
  25. ^ Young, William (2006). German Diplomatic Relations 1871–1945. Lincoln, Nebraska: iUniverse. p. 257. ISBN 9780595407064.
  26. ^ "Rocket to the Moon". Playbill Vault. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  27. ^ "Call General Strike to Curb Paris Premier". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 26, 1938. p. 1.
  28. ^ "French Army Runs Railways". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 27, 1938. p. 1.
  29. ^ "Tageseinträge für 26. November 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  30. ^ "Army Wins Over Navy, 14-7; Duke Whips Pitt, 7-0". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 27, 1938. p. 1.
  31. ^ Small, Alex (November 28, 1938). "French Strike a Red Dictator Plot – Daladier". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  32. ^ "Monty Stratton, 70, Pitcher Who Inspired Movie, Is Dead". The New York Times. September 30, 1982. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  33. ^ Majer, Diemut (2003). "Non-Germans" Under the Third Reich. Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 171. ISBN 9780801864933.
  34. ^ "O'Brien Given Honors by Two Eastern Groups". Abilene Reporter-News. Abilene, Texas. November 29, 1938. p. 13.
  35. ^ "Tageseinträge für 29. November 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  36. ^ Hoffmann, Peter (2000). Hitler's Personal Security. Da Capo Press. p. 96. ISBN 9780306809477.
  37. ^ "Let Persecuted Jews into U. S., Ford Advocates". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 1, 1938. p. 2.