November 1942

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The following events occurred in November 1942:

November 1, 1942 (Sunday)[edit]

November 2, 1942 (Monday)[edit]

November 3, 1942 (Tuesday)[edit]

November 4, 1942 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The Matanikau Offensive ended in American victory.
  • German submarine U-132 was sunk in the Atlantic Ocean by the explosion of the British cargo ship Hatimura, which had just been torpedoed by U-442.
  • German submarines U-169 and U-416 were commissioned.

November 5, 1942 (Thursday)[edit]

November 6, 1942 (Friday)[edit]

November 7, 1942 (Saturday)[edit]

November 8, 1942 (Sunday)[edit]

November 9, 1942 (Monday)[edit]

November 10, 1942 (Tuesday)[edit]

November 11, 1942 (Wednesday)[edit]

November 12, 1942 (Thursday)[edit]

  • The Naval Battle of Guadalcanal began.
  • The Koli Point action ended in American victory.
  • U.S. Congress approved the drafting of men 18 and 19 years old.[11]
  • Eddie Rickenbacker and five others were rescued in the Pacific Ocean after being lost adrift at sea for three weeks. The men had stayed alive on a diet of a few oranges retrieved from their plane when it went down, some fish they'd managed to catch and a seagull that Rickenbacker had grabbed with his bare hands.[19]
  • Guatemala broke off diplomatic relations with Vichy France.[13]
  • German submarine U-272 sank off Hela after colliding with U-634.
  • German submarine U-660 was depth charged and damaged north of Oran by British warships and had to be scuttled.
  • German submarines U-360 and U-648 was commissioned.
  • Died: Laura Hope Crews, 62, American actress

November 13, 1942 (Friday)[edit]

November 14, 1942 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Japanese battleship Hiei was sunk by enemy vessels during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal.
  • Italian cargo liner Scillin was sunk by the British submarine Sahib while transporting over 800 Allied prisoners of war from North Africa to Italy, killing almost all of them. Britain kept the cause of the sinking a secret until 1996.
  • German submarines U-595 and U-605 were depth charged and sunk in the Mediterranean by British aircraft.
  • German submarines U-231 and U-733 were commissioned.

November 15, 1942 (Sunday)[edit]

November 16, 1942 (Monday)[edit]

November 17, 1942 (Tuesday)[edit]

November 18, 1942 (Wednesday)[edit]

November 19, 1942 (Thursday)[edit]

  • The Soviets launched Operation Uranus, a counterattack aimed at surrounding Axis forces at Stalingrad.
  • The Battle for Velikiye Luki began on the Eastern Front.
  • Operation Freshman: A British airborne force landed using gliders in Norway with the intent of sabotaging a chemical plant in Telemark that the Germans could use for their atomic weapons programme. Neither of the two aircraft-glider forces were able to land near their objective and the operation ended in failure with 41 killed.
  • Died: Bruno Schulz, 50, Polish writer, artist, literary critic and art teacher (shot by a Nazi)

November 20, 1942 (Friday)[edit]

November 21, 1942 (Saturday)[edit]

November 22, 1942 (Sunday)[edit]

November 23, 1942 (Monday)[edit]

  • Operation Uranus ended in decisive Soviet victory with the German 6th Army completely encircled at Stalingrad.
  • The Governor General of French West Africa agreed to accept the authority of François Darlan. This brought the strategically valuable port city of Dakar under Allied control.[28]
  • German U-boat U-172 torpedoed and sank the British merchant ship SS Benlomond off the coast of Brazil. Chinese second steward Poon Lim survived and would spend 133 days adrift on a raft in the South Atlantic.
  • Died: Tomitarō Horii, 52, Japanese general (drowned while attempting to canoe down the Kumusi River during the Battle of Buna–Gona); Hernando Siles Reyes, 60, 37th President of Bolivia

November 24, 1942 (Tuesday)[edit]

November 25, 1942 (Wednesday)[edit]

November 26, 1942 (Thursday)[edit]

November 27, 1942 (Friday)[edit]

November 28, 1942 (Saturday)[edit]

November 29, 1942 (Sunday)[edit]

November 30, 1942 (Monday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Williams, Mary H. (1960). Special Studies, Chronology, 1941–1945. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 62.
  2. ^ "Text of Soviet Invasion Decree". ibiblio. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 575. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  4. ^ Salecker, Gene E. (2001). Fortress Against the Sun: the B-17. Da Capo Press. p. 290. ISBN 978-0-306-81715-1.
  5. ^ Day By Day: The Forties. New York: Facts On File, Inc. 1977. p. 247. ISBN 0-87196-375-2.
  6. ^ "Chronomedia: 1942". Terra Media. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  7. ^ Davidson, Edward; Manning, Dale (1999). Chronology of World War Two. London: Cassell & Co. p. 129. ISBN 0-304-35309-4.
  8. ^ Hellbeck, Jochen (2015). Stalingrad: The City that Defeated the Third Reich. PublicAffairs. p. 90. ISBN 978-1-61039-497-0.
  9. ^ "Joseph Stalin, Premier of the U.S.S.R. Order of the Day". ibiblio. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  10. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 7 November 1942". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  11. ^ a b c d e Polmar, Norman; Allen, Thomas B. (2012). World War II: the Encyclopedia of the War Years, 1941–1945. Dover Publications. pp. 27–28. ISBN 978-0-486-47962-0.
  12. ^ Stewart, William (2009). Admirals of the World: A Biographical Dictionary, 1500 to the Present. Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland & Company Inc., Publishers. p. 91. ISBN 978-0-7864-8288-7.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i Doody, Richard. "A Timeline of Diplomatic Ruptures, Unannounced Invasions, Declarations of War, Armistices and Surrenders". The World at War. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  14. ^ "German Propaganda Archive". Calvin College. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  15. ^ a b Axelrod, Alan (2008). The Real History of World War II: A New Look at the Past. New York and London: Sterling Publishing. p. 195. ISBN 978-1-4027-4090-9.
  16. ^ Tucker, Spencer (2013). Almanac of American Military History. ABC-CLIO, LLC. p. 1652. ISBN 978-1-59884-530-3.
  17. ^ Yenne, Bill (2014). The Imperial Japanese Army: The Invincible Years 1941–42. Osprey Publishing. p. 304. ISBN 978-1-78200-932-0.
  18. ^ "The Brigtht Gleam of Victory". The Churchill Centre. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  19. ^ "Eddie Rickenbacker and Six Other People Survive a B-17 Crash and Three Weeks Lost in the Pacific Ocean". HistoryNet. June 12, 2006. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  20. ^ Kennedy, David, ed. (2007). The Library of Congress World War II Companion. Simon & Schuster. p. 536. ISBN 978-1-4165-5306-9.
  21. ^ Martin, Robert Stanley (June 7, 2015). "Comics By the Date: August 1942 to December 1942". The Hooded Utilitarian. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  22. ^ a b c Chronology and Index of the Second World War, 1938–1945. Research Publications. 1990. p. 154. ISBN 978-0-88736-568-3.
  23. ^ "Events occurring on Wednesday, November 18, 1942". WW2 Timelines. 2011. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  24. ^ "Order Youths 18 Since July to Register". Brooklyn Eagle. Brooklyn. November 18, 1942. p. 1.
  25. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 21 November 1942". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  26. ^ Hamilton, Hope (2011). Sacrifice on the Steppe: The Italian Alpine Corps in the Stalingrad Campaign, 1942–1943. Havertown, PA: Casemate. p. 72. ISBN 978-1-61200-002-2.
  27. ^ Mitcham, Samuel W. (2009). The Men of Barbarossa. Philadelphia: Casemate Publishers. p. 242. ISBN 978-1-935149-66-8.
  28. ^ Kimball, Warren F. (1984). Churchill & Roosevelt, The Complete Correspondence Volume II: Alliance forged, November 1942-February 1944. Princeton University Press. p. 56.
  29. ^ Tarrant, V.E. (1992). Stalingrad. Leo Cooper. pp. 145–146. ISBN 978-0-85052-342-3.
  30. ^ Tallent, Aaron (December 10, 2015). "The Army-Navy Game During World War II". Athlon Sports & Life. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  31. ^ Argyle, Christopher (1980). Chronology of World War II. Exeter Books. p. 115. ISBN 978-0-89673-071-7.
  32. ^ "Prime Minister Winston Churchill Broadcast". ibiblio. Retrieved February 1, 2016.