Nozomi Okuhara

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Nozomi Okuhara
Personal information
Birth name 奥原 希望
Born (1995-03-13) 13 March 1995 (age 23)
Ōmachi, Nagano, Japan
Height 1.56 m (5 ft 1 in)
Handedness Right
Women's singles
Career record 229–76
Highest ranking 3 (17 November 2016)
Current ranking 8 (13 September 2018)
BWF profile

Nozomi Okuhara (奥原 希望, Okuhara Nozomi, born 13 March 1995)[1] is a Japanese badminton player who is a singles specialist, well known for her speed, agility and endurance. She won a bronze medal in the 2016 Olympics.[2] She became the 2017 world champion in Glasgow, Scotland after defeating India's P. V. Sindhu in the finals.

Career[edit]

In 2011, the then 16-year-old Nozomi Okuhara became the youngest women's singles champion ever at the All Japan Badminton Championships, which are the Japanese National Badminton Championships. She won a BWF World junior title in the girls singles event at the 2012 BWF World Junior Championships after reaching the semi-finals, having won bronze one year earlier at the 2011 BWF World Junior Championships.

She was a runner-up at the 2012 Asian Junior Badminton Championships. Also in 2012, she won her first Grand Prix title at the 2012 Canada Open Grand Prix. In 2013, she was mainly absent from the court due to knee injury. She won her first BWF Super Series title at the 2015 Japan Super Series.

In 2016, she won the prestigious All England Open and thereby became the first Japanese women's singles player to lift this title in the past 39 years.[3] She also won the bronze medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics. She lost to P.V. Sindhu in the semi-finals, but won the bronze medal against Li Xuerui of China in a walkover.

At the 2017 BWF World Championships in Glasgow, Scotland, Okuhara reached the finals after back-to-back wins against both finalists from the 2015 BWF World Championships, Carolina Marín of Spain and Saina Nehwal of India. In a hard-fought final, featuring the longest match of the entire tournament, Okuhara then defeated P. V. Sindhu, winning by 21–19, 20–22, 22–20 in almost 2 hours.[4]

Achievements[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2016 Riocentro – Pavilion 4, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil China Li Xuerui Walkover Bronze Bronze

BWF World Championships[edit]

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2017 Emirates Arena, Glasgow, Scotland India P. V. Sindhu 21–19, 20–22, 22–20 Gold Gold

World Junior Championships[edit]

Girls' singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2012 Chiba Port Arena, Chiba, Japan Japan Akane Yamaguchi 21–12, 21–9 Gold Gold
2011 Taoyuan Arena, Taoyuan& Taipei, Chinese Taipei Thailand Ratchanok Inthanon 16–21, 16–21 Bronze Bronze

Asian Junior Championships[edit]

Girls' singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result
2012 Gimcheon Indoor Stadium, Gimcheon, South Korea India P. V. Sindhu 21–18, 17–21, 20–22 Silver Silver

BWF World Tour[edit]

The BWF World Tour, announced on 19 March 2017 and implemented in 2018,[5] is a series of elite badminton tournaments, sanctioned by Badminton World Federation (BWF). The BWF World Tour are divided into six levels, namely World Tour Finals, Super 1000, Super 750, Super 500, Super 300 (part of the HSBC World Tour), and the BWF Tour Super 100.[6]

Women's singles

Year Tournament Level Opponent Score Result
2018 Japan Open Super 750 Spain Carolina Marin 19–21, 21–17, 11–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2018 Thailand Open Super 500 India P. V. Sindhu 21–15, 21–18 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner

BWF Superseries[edit]

The BWF Superseries, launched on 14 December 2006 and implemented in 2007, is a series of elite badminton tournaments, sanctioned by Badminton World Federation (BWF). BWF Superseries has two levels: Superseries and Superseries Premier. A season of Superseries features twelve tournaments around the world, which introduced since 2011, with successful players invited to the Superseries Finals held at the year end.

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2017 Korea Open India P. V. Sindhu 22–20, 11–21, 21–18 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2017 Australian Open Japan Akane Yamaguchi 21–12, 21–23, 21–17 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2016 All England Open China Wang Shixian 21–11, 16–21, 21–19 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2015 World Superseries Finals China Wang Yihan 22–20, 21–18 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2015 Hong Kong Open Spain Carolina Marín 17–21, 21–18, 20–22 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
2015 Japan Open Japan Akane Yamaguchi 21–18, 21–12 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2014 Hong Kong Open Chinese Taipei Tai Tzu-ying 19–21, 11–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
     BWF Superseries Finals tournament
     BWF Superseries Premier tournament
     BWF Superseries tournament

BWF Grand Prix[edit]

The BWF Grand Prix has two level such as Grand Prix and Grand Prix Gold. It is a series of badminton tournaments, sanctioned by Badminton World Federation (BWF) since 2007.

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2015 U.S. Open Japan Sayaka Sato 21–16, 21–14 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2015 Malaysia Masters Japan Sayaka Takahashi 21–13, 21–17 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2014 Korea Masters Japan Sayaka Sato 21–17, 21–13 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2014 Vietnam Open Japan Aya Ohori 21–15, 21–11 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2014 New Zealand Open Japan Kana Ito 21–15, 21–3 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2012 Canada Open Japan Sayaka Takahashi 21–8, 21–16 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
     BWF Grand Prix Gold tournament
     BWF Grand Prix tournament

BWF International Challenge/Series[edit]

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result
2015 China International China Chen Yufei 21–19, 21–16 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2011 Austrian International Japan Mayu Sekiya 21–6, 21–16 1st, gold medalist(s) Winner
2010 Lao International Thailand Nitchaon Jindapol 16–21 17–21 2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up
     BWF International Challenge tournament

References[edit]

External links[edit]