Nsukka

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Nsukka
Town
View of Nsukka from a neighboring hill
View of Nsukka from a neighboring hill
Nsukka is located in Nigeria
Nsukka
Nsukka
Coordinates: 6°51′24″N 7°23′45″E / 6.85667°N 7.39583°E / 6.85667; 7.39583Coordinates: 6°51′24″N 7°23′45″E / 6.85667°N 7.39583°E / 6.85667; 7.39583
Country Nigeria
StateEnugu State
Area
 • Total2,141.08 sq mi (5,545.38 km2)
Elevation
1,410 ft (430 m)
Population
 (2006 Census)[1]
 • Total309,633


1,500,000 now
Time zoneGMT+1
3-digit postal code prefix
410
ISO 3166 codeNG.EN.NS
ClimateAw

Nsukka is a town and a Local Government Area in Enugu State, Nigeria. Nsukka shares a common border with Edem, Opi (archaeological site), Ede-Oballa, and Obimo.

The postal code of the area is 410001 and 410002 respectively referring to University of Nigeria Campus, and Nsukka Urban.[2]

History[edit]

There is a postulation that the Nsukka people migrated from Igala land, having been sired by one “Asadu”, a prince of the Igala kingdom [3] Asadu Attah (as his full name was) was a prime minister at Idah, (capital of the Igala kingdom) who had run into trouble with the king. In the ensuing commotion, he was said to have advised his four children to flee eastwards from Idah in order to avert assassination. One of the sons was believed to have settled at Okpuje; the second at Obukpa; the third. their patrilineal brother, at Eha-Alumona; while the fourth son settled at the present location of Nsukka town and was formerly known as “Ideke”.[4] The Asadu dynasty was a political dynasty in the Igala kingdom whose function to Attah is that of a prime minister (Onowu) [5]


Nsukka's Ancient Wars

Nsukka in the 18th and 19th century had one of the best fighting forces in present-day Enugu-North which they employed in waging war against their neighbours in order to gain more territories for their rising population and for other purposes[citation needed]. Each community that made up the town of Nsukka had stationed in them a fighting force made up of people from that community.[citation needed]

Nsukka's numerous wars with her neighbours were usually successful such that some surrounding communities requested help from Nsukka to protect them from their attackers.[6]

Another instance of Nsukka's expansionist bid was the war with Ejuona-Obukpa (a community in Obukpa) which eventually ended in the annexing of a part of Ejuona-Obukpa. According to D. C. Ugwu, this war should not be viewed as one between Nsukka and the entire Obukpa as Ejuona (the involved community) refused the assistance of the rest of Obukpa.[7]

By the time the war ended, Nsukka succeeded in taking parts of Ejuona-Obukpa, almost wiping out one village (Umugboguru) of all its inhabitants in the process.[5]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Nsukka
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 36.1
(97.0)
36.9
(98.4)
37.8
(100.0)
36.7
(98.1)
35.0
(95.0)
33.3
(91.9)
35.0
(95.0)
32.8
(91.0)
32.8
(91.0)
34.4
(93.9)
35.0
(95.0)
35.6
(96.1)
37.8
(100.0)
Average high °C (°F) 33.5
(92.3)
34.9
(94.8)
34.7
(94.5)
33.6
(92.5)
32.0
(89.6)
30.5
(86.9)
29.5
(85.1)
29.6
(85.3)
30.2
(86.4)
31.2
(88.2)
32.6
(90.7)
32.9
(91.2)
32.1
(89.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) 25.6
(78.1)
27.2
(81.0)
28.3
(82.9)
27.4
(81.3)
26.6
(79.9)
25.5
(77.9)
25.0
(77.0)
24.8
(76.6)
24.8
(76.6)
25.3
(77.5)
26.0
(78.8)
25.6
(78.1)
26.0
(78.8)
Average low °C (°F) 20.3
(68.5)
22.8
(73.0)
23.9
(75.0)
23.9
(75.0)
23.1
(73.6)
22.6
(72.7)
22.3
(72.1)
22.3
(72.1)
22.1
(71.8)
22.3
(72.1)
21.6
(70.9)
20.0
(68.0)
22.3
(72.1)
Record low °C (°F) 12.8
(55.0)
12.8
(55.0)
16.1
(61.0)
19.4
(66.9)
19.4
(66.9)
18.9
(66.0)
19.4
(66.9)
18.9
(66.0)
18.3
(64.9)
18.9
(66.0)
14.4
(57.9)
12.2
(54.0)
12.2
(54.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 18.8
(0.74)
15.4
(0.61)
70.3
(2.77)
130.1
(5.12)
217.2
(8.55)
251.9
(9.92)
241.9
(9.52)
237.1
(9.33)
292.0
(11.50)
200.9
(7.91)
12.1
(0.48)
7.7
(0.30)
1,695.4
(66.75)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm) 1.4 1.2 3.9 6.8 12.2 13.7 15.6 15.3 17.8 12.2 1.3 0.7 102.1
Average relative humidity (%) (at 15:00 LST) 34.3 37.4 45.6 56.4 63.6 68.5 71.3 70.8 70.3 66.4 50.5 38.7 56.1
Mean monthly sunshine hours 186.0 173.6 182.9 183.0 186.0 153.0 117.8 117.8 123.0 173.6 219.0 217.0 2,032.7
Mean daily sunshine hours 6.0 6.2 5.9 6.1 6.0 5.1 3.8 3.8 4.1 5.6 7.3 7.0 5.6
Source 1: NOAA[8]
Source 2: Deutscher Wetterdienst (extremes)[9]

Cultural Practices[edit]

Cow (Eshu) Rituals[edit]

There are many other rituals performed by the people either the Christians or the traditional believers after the burial, Cow (Eshu) in funeral rite is bound up with the belief of the people which point to their conception of the world that encompasses the spiritual and physical worlds. The circle of human life becomes complete with the people's belief that the funeral cow facilitates the dead into the spirit world. The cow ritual like any other ritual in Igbo traditional religion unveils the innate meaning of the people's world view and their religious belief. Nsukka people believe that only people with ascribed status are 36 entitled to cow ritual of the funeral rite since every dead person are not qualified for it, those who died good death, died at ripped age, performed cow ritual to their dead parent(s) are entitled to funeral cow ritual. [10]

Ndishi Tradition[edit]

In traditional Igbo society, men’s dominance was total. Women were to be seen but not to be heard: it was a man’s world. Whether in the day to day governance, economic activities, religion, among others, women played a peripheral role in the society. A man could marry as many wives as he wants. The younger wives could be the age mates of his first set of children. Whether the husband is virile enough to satisfy the innumerable wives is hardly taken into consideration. To check marital infidelity on the part of the women in this polygamous society, the Nsukka Igbo instituted the Ndishi/Nna tradition.  The Ndishi/Nna tradition connotes a spiritual avowal among the Nsukka people which origin is embedded in myth. The tradition forbids any married woman from engaging in any form of extra-marital affairs or assisting the relations without express permission of the husband.   Women from other parts of Igboland who are married to the men of this area are usually forewarned about the efficacy of this tradition. It is the general belief among the people that any such act attracts the wrath of the gods   which results to instant madness for the transgressor. Employing qualitative approach which includes, participant observation, indepth interviews and oral tradition, the researchers explored the potency of this tradition in checking marital infidelity.  Enugu- Ezike, Obollo, and Imilike communities which have distinct cultural practices among Nsukka people were selected for the study. Johannes Andenaees’s theory of punishment and deterrence would be applied.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Federal Republic of Nigeria Official Gazette (15 May 2007). "Legal Notice on Publication of the Details of the Breakdown of the National and State Provisional Totals 2006 Census" (PDF). Retrieved 1 July 2010.
  2. ^ "Post Offices- with map of LGA". NIPOST. Archived from the original on 7 October 2009. Retrieved 20 October 2009.
  3. ^ Ugwuja Alex. “Unresolved Issues of Igbo Origin: A Case Study of the Nsukka Migration from Igala”, An Unpublished B. A. Project Submitted to the Department of History and International Studies, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, July 2009.
  4. ^ Ngwu, R. O. “Politics and Chieftaincy in Nsukka before Colonialism”, A B. A. Project Submitted to the Department of History, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, January 1980
  5. ^ a b Ozioko, M. A. (2005). Obukpa: Past and Present. Enugu: De-Adroit Innovation. pp. 55–56.
  6. ^ "The Death of Arua Ugwuoke and Nsukka's War with Ede-Ọbara". Ekene Ugwuanyi. 2 August 2020. Retrieved 19 September 2020.[dead link]
  7. ^ Ugwu, D. C. (1985). This is Obukpa: The History of a Typical Ancient State. Enugu: Fourth Dimension Publishers. p. 3. ISBN 9789781562884.
  8. ^ "Enugu Climate Normals 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  9. ^ "Klimatafel von Enugu / Nigeria" (PDF). Baseline climate means (1961–1990) from stations all over the world (in German). Deutscher Wetterdienst. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  10. ^ Ossai, Anayo Benjamin (2016). "Cow(Eshu) ritual in the funeral rite: the sigificance in the Nsukka cultural area of Igboland". Journal of Religion and Human Relations. 8 (2): 35–54. doi:10.4314/jrhr.v8i2. ISSN 2006-5442.
  11. ^ Ngozika Obi-Ani; Chiemezie Atama; Charity. N. Onyishi (2016). "Ndishi/ Nna Tradition among Nsukka Igbo: Crude Tool in a Man's World". doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.2576.1529. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)