Nuclear power by country

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
The Cattenom Nuclear Power Plant in France. France produces around three quarters of its electricity by nuclear power.[1]
The Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Plant in Germany. Chancellor Angela Merkel's coalition announced on 30 May 2011, that Germany's 14 nuclear power stations will be shut down by 2022, in a policy reversal following Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.[2]

Nuclear power plants currently operate in 31 countries. Most are in Europe, North America, East Asia and South Asia. The United States is the largest producer of nuclear power, while France has the largest share of electricity generated by nuclear power. In 2010, before the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, it was reported that an average of about 10 nuclear reactors were expected to become operational per year, although according to the World Nuclear Association, of the 17 civilian reactors planned to become operational between 2007 and 2009, only five actually came on stream.[3] Global nuclear electricity generation in 2012 was at its lowest level since 1999.[4][5]

China has the fastest growing nuclear power program with 28 new reactors under construction,[6] and a considerable number of new reactors are also being built in India, Russia and South Korea. At the same time, at least 100 older and smaller reactors will "most probably be closed over the next 10–15 years".[3]

Some countries operated nuclear reactors in the past but have currently no operating nuclear plants. Among them, Italy closed all of its nuclear stations by 1990 and nuclear power has since been discontinued because of the 1987 referendums on which Italians voted. Lithuania, Kazakhstan and Armenia are planning to reintroduce nuclear power in the future.

Several countries are currently operating nuclear power plants but are planning a nuclear power phase-out. These are Belgium, Germany, Spain, and Switzerland. Other countries, like Netherlands, Sweden, and Taiwan are also considering a phase-out. Austria never started to use its first nuclear plant that was completely built.

Due to financial, political and technical reasons, Cuba, Libya, North Korea, and Poland never completed the construction of their first nuclear plants, and Australia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Ghana, Ireland, Kuwait, Oman, Peru, Singapore, and Venezuela never built their planned first nuclear plants.[7][8]

Overview[edit]

Nations based on nuclear output as a percentage of national power output.
Timeline of commissioned and decommissioned nuclear capacity since the 1950s.[9] Positive numbers show the commissioned capacity for each year; negative numbers show the decommissioned capacity for each year.
Global status of nuclear deployment as of 2017 (source: see file description)
  Operating reactors, building new reactors
  Operating reactors, planning new build
  No reactors, building new reactors
  No reactors, planning new build
  Operating reactors, stable
  Operating reactors, considering phase-out
  Civil nuclear power is illegal
  No reactors

Of the 31 countries in which nuclear power plants operate, only France, Slovakia, Ukraine, Belgium, and Hungary use them as the source for a majority of the country's electricity supply. Other countries have significant amounts of nuclear power generation capacity.[10] By far the largest nuclear electricity producers are the United States with 805 647 GWh of nuclear electricity in 2017, followed by France with 381 846 GWh.[10] As of December 2017 448 reactors with a net capacity of 391 721 MWe are operational and 59 reactors with net capacity of 60 460 MWe are under construction, of those 18 reactors with 19 016 MWe in China.[11]

Nuclear power by country in 2016[10][9][1]
Country Reactors Capacity
Net-total (MWe)
Generated
electricity (GWh)
Share of total
electricity use
Notes
operational U/C
Argentina Argentina 3 1 1633 5716.27 4.5%
Armenia Armenia 1 0 375 2411.39 32.5%
Bangladesh Bangladesh 0 1 N/A N/A N/A
Belarus Belarus 0 2 N/A N/A N/A
Belgium Belgium 7 0 5918 40186.70 49.9%
Brazil Brazil 2 1 1884 14854.33 2.7%
Bulgaria Bulgaria 2 0 1926 14872.26 34.3%
Canada Canada 19 0 13554 95131.20 14.6%
China China 39 19 34514 232796.74 3.9%
Czech Republic Czech Republic 6 0 3930 26784.68 33.1%
Finland Finland 4 1 2769 21573.97 33.2%
France France 58 1 63130 381846.02 71.6%
Germany Germany 8 0 10799 72162.80 11.6% Phase-out by 2022
Hungary Hungary 4 0 1889 15218.92 50.0%
India India 22 6 6255 20004.34 3.2%
Iran Iran 1 0 915 6366.21 2.2%
Japan Japan 42 2 39752 29285.05 3.6% Most reactors currently stopped
South Korea Korea, Republic of 25 2 23070 141278.32 27.1%
Mexico Mexico 2 0 1552 10571.92 6.0%
Netherlands Netherlands 1 0 482 3263.18 2.9%
Pakistan Pakistan 5 2 1318 8108.93 6.2%
Romania Romania 2 0 1300 10580.15 17.6%
Russia Russia 35 7 26142 190115.15 17.8%
Slovakia Slovakia 4 2 1814 14015.82 54.0%
Slovenia Slovenia 1 0 688 5967.83 39.1%
South Africa South Africa 2 0 1860 15087.29 6.7%
Spain Spain 7 0 7121 55627.75 21.2%
Sweden Sweden 9 0 9102 63062.89 39.6%
Switzerland Switzerland 5 0 3333 19590.70 33.4% Phase-out planned
Taiwan Taiwan 6 2 5052 21560.47 9.3%
Turkey Turkey 0 2 N/A N/A N/A
Ukraine Ukraine 15 2 13107 80405.85 55.1%
United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates 0 4 N/A N/A N/A
United Kingdom United Kingdom 15 0 8918 63886.83 19.3%
United States United States 99 2 99952 805647.33 20.0%
World total 451 59 394,054 MWe 2,488 TWh

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "World Nuclear Power Reactors & Uranium Requirements". World Nuclear Association. 1 October 2010. Retrieved 23 October 2010.
  2. ^ Annika Breidthardt (30 May 2011). "German government wants nuclear exit by 2022 at latest". Reuters.
  3. ^ a b Michael Dittmar. Taking stock of nuclear renaissance that never was Sydney Morning Herald, 18 August 2010.
  4. ^ WNA (20 June 2013). "Nuclear power down in 2012". World Nuclear News.
  5. ^ "The Nuclear Renaissance".
  6. ^ "China Nuclear Power - Chinese Nuclear Energy".
  7. ^ Duroyan Fertl (5 June 2011). "Germany: Nuclear power to be phased out by 2022". Green Left.
  8. ^ James Kanter (25 May 2011). "Switzerland Decides on Nuclear Phase-Out". New York Times.
  9. ^ a b "Operational & Long-Term Shutdown Reactors". IAEA. 13 April 2013. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  10. ^ a b c "Nuclear Share of Electricity Generation in 2017". IAEA. 24 May 2018. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  11. ^ Nuclear Power Reactors in the World (PDF). Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency. 2018. ISBN 978-92-0-101418-4.

External links[edit]