Nur Ahmad Jan Bughra

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Nur Ahmad Jan Bughra
Khotan Amir Nur Ahmad Jan Bughra killed at yangi hissar in april 1934.jpg
Nur Ahmad Jan Bughra
Emir of the First East Turkestan Republic
In office
1933 – April 16, 1934
Personal details
Born Khotan
Died April 16, 1934
Yangi Hissar
Nationality Uighur
Political party Flag of the First East Turkestan Republic Young Kashgar Party and Committee for National Revolution[1]
Relations Muhammad Amin Bughra, Abdullah Bughra
Religion Islam

Nur Ahmad Jan Bughra (d. April 16, 1934[2]) (Uyghur: نۇر ئەخمەتجان بۇغرا‎), نور احمد جان بغرا, was an Uighur Emir of the First East Turkestan Republic. He was the younger brother of Muhammad Amin Bughra and Abdullah Bughra. He commanded Uighur and Kirghiz forces during the Battle of Kashgar (1934) against the Chinese Muslim 36th Division (National Revolutionary Army). The Chinese Muslims were loyal to the Republic of China government, and wanted to crush the Turkic Muslim Uighurs and Kirghiz in revenge for the Kizil massacre, in which Nur Ahmad Jan Bughra had taken part. He was killed on April 16, 1934 at Yangi Hissar by Chinese Muslim troops under generals Ma Zhancang and Ma Fuyuan.[3] All of Nur Ahmad Jan's 2,500 Uighur and Kirghiz fighters were exterminated by the 10,000 strong Chinese Muslim army.[4][5]

It was reported by Ahmad Kamal in his book "Land Without Laughter" on page 130-131, that Nur Ahmad Jan's was beheaded by the Chinese Muslim troops and the head was used in a football game at the parade ground.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 84. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  2. ^ Ondřej Klimeš (8 January 2015). Struggle by the Pen: The Uyghur Discourse of Nation and National Interest, c.1900-1949. BRILL. pp. 122–. ISBN 978-90-04-28809-6. 
  3. ^ "Fighting Continues Tungan Troops Still Active in Chinese Turkestan". The Montreal Gazette. 10 May 1934. 
  4. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 123. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  5. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 303. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  6. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 303. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 

External links[edit]