Nuremberg–Munich high-speed railway

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Nuremberg–Munich high-speed railway
SFS Nuernberg-Muenchen.png
Overview
Native nameSchnellfahrstrecke Nürnberg–Ingolstadt–München
OwnerDB Netz
Line number
  • 5934 (new line)
  • 5501 (upgraded line)
LocaleBavaria, Germany
Service
Route number
  • 900 (Nuremberg–Munich regional services)
  • 900.1 (Munich–Würzburg long-distance)
  • 990 (Treuchtlingen–Munich)
Operator(s)DB Fernverkehr
DB Regio Bayern
S-Bahn München
Nuremberg S-Bahn
Technical
Line length170.8 km (106.1 mi)
Number of tracks2 (+ 2 S-Bahn tracks south of Petershausen)
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in) standard gauge
Minimum radius
  • new line: 4,085 m (13,402 ft)
  • upgraded line: m 814 m (2,671 ft)
Electrification15 kV/16.7 Hz AC overhead catenary
Operating speed
  • new line: 300 km/h (186.4 mph) (max)
  • upgraded line: 200 km/h (124.3 mph) (max)
Maximum incline
  • new line: 2.0%
  • upgraded line: 1.25%
Route map

100.6
Nuremberg Hbf
312 m
91.0
9.6
Nürnberg Reichswald junction
9.8
(start of new line)
~10.6
~11.2
~12.0
~15.0
~15.5
A 73 (Nuremberg/Feucht interchange)
25.4
Allersberg (Rothsee)
390 m
29.0
~33.6
40.5
42.4
Bk Lohen
~46,0
St 2227 near Großhöbing (305 m)
~47,0
49.1
~57.7
57.8
58.6
Kinding (Altmühltal)
375 m
59.4
59.6
67.6
76.0
78.1
85.0
Audi Tunnel (1258 m)
86.8
Ingolstadt Nord
(end of the new line)
87.0
84.3
from Treuchtlingen
(3-tracks, grade-separated)
83.4
former course of the
Ingolstadt–Neuoffingen railway from Ulm
81.0
Ingolstadt Hbf
368 m
former course of the
Paar Valley Railway to Augsburg
~78.4
to Augsburg, connecting to Ulm
(grade separated)
(start of upgraded line)
77.1
Oberstimm
~74.4
Ebenhausen works siding
72.9
Baar-Ebenhausen
(since 2011)
373 m
72.4
Reichertshofen (Oberbay)
(until 2011)
~71.0
~67.8
66.4
Hög
~60.6
Hallertau Local Railway
from Wolnzach Markt (only freight)
60.2
Rohrbach (Ilm)
(until 2000: Wolnzach Bahnhof)
420 m
~58.4
A 9
55.4
Walkersbach
54.6
Uttenhofen crossover
49.7
Pfaffenhofen (Ilm)
435 m
43.8
Reichertshausen (Ilm)
454 m
40.2
Paindorf
start of S-Bahn tracks
36.4
Petershausen (Oberbayern)
469 m
~34.8
30.4
Esterhofen
30.3
Vierkirchen-Esterhofen
27.7
Röhrmoos crossover
27.1
Röhrmoos
493 m
27.2
Röhrmoos Hp
24.1
Viaduct near Reipertshofen (141 m)
22.2
Hebertshausen
22.0
Walpertshofen
17.8
Dachau Bahnhof
14.2
München-Karlsfeld
~13.6
12.9
München-Karlsfeld S-Bahn
from Munich North marshalling yard
(double track)
10.4
München-Allach
508 m
9.0
München-Untermenzing
7.5
München-Obermenzing
518 m
6.7
München-Obermenzing junction
to München-Laim marshalling yard
from München-Pasing freight yard
5.3
München Kanal
(junction)
0.0
Munich Hbf
523 m
Source: German railway atlas[1]

The Nuremberg–Munich high-speed railway line is a 171 kilometre-long (106 miles) high-speed railway running between the two largest cities in Bavaria, Germany: Nuremberg and Munich.

The northern section, between Nuremberg and Ingolstadt, is a 300 km/h (186 mph) track built between 1998 and 2006. It is 90.1 km (56.0 mi) in length with nine tunnels (total length: 27 km or 17 mi). In order to minimize damage to the environment, it runs for the most part right next to Bundesautobahn 9. The southern section, between Ingolstadt and Munich, is 19th-century track. Its southern section has been upgraded for up to 200 km/h (124 mph). Between 2010 and 2013, further upgrades to the midsection of the track will be done. The minimum speed on the Munich-Ingolstadt section should then be 160 km/h (99 mph), with 190 km/h (118 mph) in the middle and 200 km/h in the southern section.

Both long-distance and regional services operate on the line. Intercity-Express trains reach the tracks' 300 km/h speed-limit. InterCity and RegionalExpress trains travel at a maximum speed of 200 km/h. The Allersberg-Express, a RegionalBahn shuttle service, was operated between Allersberg and Nuremberg until December 2020 when it was replaced by S5 of the Nuremberg S-Bahn. The line was officially inaugurated on May 13, 2006. Limited operation with a twice-hourly long-distance service started on 28 May 2006. The line has been in full operation since December 2006. Compared to the former track via Augsburg, it cut off 29 km (18 mi), or about 30 minutes journey time on long-distance and an hour on regional trains.

Most of the track is equipped with Linienzugbeeinflussung and GSM-R. ETCS was planned to be introduced in 2009, although this seems to be delayed until at least 2017. The total costs (as of January 2006) were about €3.6 billion. The line is part of the Line 1 of Trans-European Transport Networks (TEN-T).

History[edit]

The Irlahülltunnel (7260 m) is one of the longest and steepest (20 permille) rail tunnels in Germany
The Irlahüll Tunnel (7,260 m or 23,819 ft) is one of the longest and steepest (20 permille) rail tunnels in Germany.

The Munich–Ingolstadt line was opened in 1867 and was extended to Treuchtlingen as the Ingolstadt–Treuchtlingen line in 1870.

The first proposal for a high-speed line dates back to 1983, when the Nuremberg section of Deutsche Bundesbahn proposed a more direct line between Nuremberg and Munich. The project was added to the 1985 federal traffic infrastructure plan. The following years were marked by heated debate on the route of the line, in particular if it should run via Ingolstadt or Augsburg. While the Ingolstadt line is much more direct (171 km or 106 mi) than the existing Augsburg route (199 km or 124 mi), the metropolitan area of Augsburg is considered much larger than Ingolstadt's. Apart from concerns that fewer long-distance trains would run via (and stop at) Augsburg, there were also concerns about the environmental effects of the 75 km (47 mi) of track that had to be built from scratch. Large-scale construction began in 1998, when numerous disputes had finally been settled and the total cost was estimated to be €2.3 billion. The €1.3 billion cost increase arose from numerous geological problems found during construction and additional works required to meet environmental and security concerns.

On 2 September 2006, Österreichische Bundesbahnen (ÖBB) locomotive 1216 050 (Siemens Eurosprinter) set a new world record for locomotives with a top speed of 357 km/h (222 mph); reached near Hilpoltstein.

Operations[edit]

Besides high speed ICE trains, the line is also served by regional trains and (since the 2020 schedule change) S5 of the Nuremberg S-Bahn which is operated with DB Class 1440 (Alstom Coradia Continental) trainsets.[2][3] Due to scheduling concerns, regional trains need to be capable of speeds in excess of 160 km/h (the limit of the German legacy signalling system) and are thus equipped with LZB which allows higher speeds. Regional services are often operated with DB Class 101 hauled former Intercity coaches. Those aging coaches and locomotives are planned to be replaced with Škoda Transportation produced DB Class 102 locomotives hauling bilevel coaches. The new rolling stock with a top speed of 190 km/h was ordered in 2013 and initially planned for an entry into service in 2016 which suffered numerous delays[4] due to teething problems. They finally entered service in December 2020.[5][6][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eisenbahnatlas Deutschland (German railway atlas). Schweers + Wall. 2009. pp. 89, 97, 107, 162, 164–7. ISBN 978-3-89494-139-0.
  2. ^ "S-Bahn Nürnberg: Erneuerung des Fahrzeugparks abgeschlossen". 12 December 2020.
  3. ^ "Baden-Württemberg/Bayern: Regionalbahnen werden zu S-Bahnen".
  4. ^ "Drei Jahre zu spät: Neue Škoda-Züge bieten wenig Komfort".
  5. ^ "München-Nürnberg-Express: Neue Skoda-Doppelstockzüge starten Mitte November in den Probebetrieb". 9 November 2020.
  6. ^ "Neue Skoda-Doppelstockzüge nehmen ab Dezember Fahrgastbetrieb auf". 16 November 2020.
  7. ^ "Neue Züge für Nürnberg-München-Express kommen mit Rekordverspätung".

External links[edit]