OC Weekly

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OC Weekly
OC Weekly (front page).jpg
Type Alternative weekly
Owner(s) Voice Media Group
Editor Gustavo Arellano
Headquarters 2975 Red Hill Ave.
Suite 150
Costa Mesa, California 92626
Circulation 50,759 (2014)[1]
Website ocweekly.com

OC Weekly is a free weekly paper (an alternative weekly) distributed in Orange County and Long Beach, California. OC Weekly was founded in September 1995 by Will Swaim, who acted as editor and publisher until 2007.[2] The weekly newspaper is owned by Voice Media Group and is a sister publication of the LA Weekly and The Village Voice.[3] As of 2014, it had a total circulation of 50,759 papers[1] with an estimated readership of 225,000.[4] The weekly highlights content that critiques local politics, personalities and culture and has been described as "what some people might politely call an edgy brand of journalism."[4] For his newspaper work, the publisher Gustavo Arellano received a 2014 Distinguished Journalist Award from the Greater Los Angeles chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and the 2008 Spirit Award from the California Latino Legislative Caucus as well as awards from the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, the Los Angeles Press Club and the National Hispanic Media Coalition.[5]

Popular features include: the syndicated column "¡Ask a Mexican!", in which Arellano responds to reader questions about Latino stereotypes in an amusing politically incorrect manner;[6] an award-winning news blog called Navel Gazing; a food blog called "Stick a Fork in It"; and the award-winning investigative work of R. Scott Moxley, Nick Schou and Matt Coker.

The OC Weekly's articles frequently target conservative politicians and hypocrisies within the local establishment.[2] Exposes have led to felony indictments against two consecutive Huntington Beach mayors,[2] helped free innocent men and a woman from prison.[citation needed] and exposed the relationship between the local sheriff and an organized crime associate.[citation needed] In early 2009, that sheriff was sentenced to 66 months in federal prison.[citation needed] Other noteworthy coverage has included the Catholic Church sex-abuse scandal, and Orange County's controversial toll road, a multi-billion dollar subsidy to the richest man in OC.[citation needed] Its articles get cited frequently by the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Report.[citation needed] In 2009, a ranking California Republican state assemblyman and vice chairman of a powerful utilities committee resigned within hours of the Weekly disclosing his sexual relationship with a lobbyist for Sempra Energy, a giant California utility.[citation needed]

The paper is distributed at coffee shops, bookstores, clothing stores, convenience stores,and street boxes. OC Weekly prints art and entertainment listings for both Orange and Los Angeles counties.

In January 2015, Voice Media Group offered the OC Weekly for sale.[3]


  1. ^ a b "eCirc for Consumer Magazines". Audit Bureau of Circulations. December 21, 2014. Retrieved November 30, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c Reza, H.G. (January 26, 2007). "OC Weekly editor quits in dispute with owners". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Dimartino, Mediha (January 27, 2015). "OC Weekly on Sales Block". Orange County Business Journal. 
  4. ^ a b Lanser, Jonathan (27 January 2015). "Anyone want a used weekly? OC Weekly up for sale". Orang County Register. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  5. ^ "SPJ/LA Announces 2014 Distinguished Journalist Honorees". Awards. Society of Professional Journalist/ Los Angeles. November 3, 2014. Retrieved 8 May 2015. 
  6. ^ Tim Gaynor, "Confused by your neighbors? Then Ask a Mexican!", Reuters, 1 May 2007. Accessed 2010-10-21.

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