OFC Women's Nations Cup

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OFC Women's Nations Cup
Founded 1983
Region Oceania (OFC)
Number of teams 4
Current champions  New Zealand (5th title)
Most successful team(s)  New Zealand (5 titles)
2018 OFC Women's Nations Cup

The OFC Women's Nations Cup (previously known as the OFC Women's Championship) is a women's association football tournament for national teams who belong to the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC). It was held every three years from 1983 to 1989. Currently, the tournament is held at irregular intervals. Of the 10 tournaments that have been held, New Zealand won five of them.

The competition has served as a qualifying tournament for the FIFA Women's World Cup since 1991. In 2007, the competition took place in Papua New Guinea for the second time. Tonga and the Solomon Islands each took part for the first time in the four-team event, which was plagued by withdrawals from six squads.

The most recent edition was played in October 2014 in Papua New Guinea and was won by New Zealand for the fifth time.[1]

Only three nations have won the trophy: Australia (3 times), New Zealand (5 times) and Taiwan (2 times).

Australia ceased to be a member of the OFC on January 1, 2006, having elected to join the Asian Football Confederation (AFC), and hence no longer participate in the tournament.

History[edit]

First Tournaments (1983–1989)[edit]

The OFC Women's Nations Cup started in 1983 (as the OFC Women's Championship). The first edition took place in New Caledonia, and was won by New Zealand, after defeating Australia 3–2 in Nouméa. New Caledonia and Fiji also participated in this edition.

New Zealand hosted the second edition in 1986, won by guests Taiwan, after beating Australia 4–1. A second New Zealand team also played in this tournament.

Taiwan won again in 1989, on Australian soil, against New Zealand. This edition marked the debut of Papua New Guinea, who lost all of its games.

First World Cup qualifiers (1991–1995)[edit]

The tournament returned in 1991, again in Australia; with only three teams: the hosts, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea. This competition also served as the qualifying process for the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup. New Zealand finished first and qualified for the World Cup.

In 1995, Papua New Guinea was the host. This edition featured the same teams from the previous edition. Australia won the tournament this time and qualified for the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden.

1998 to today[edit]

The American Samoa and Samoa made their debuts in 1998. This time, the competition took place in Australia, and was won by them. The country won again in 2003. This was their last participation on the championship before moving to the Asian Football Confederation in 2006.

The following editions were all won by New Zealand, with Papua New Guinea in the second place.

Results[edit]

The top four placed teams so far were:[2]

Year Host Final Third place play-off Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up 3rd place Score 4th place
1983  New Caledonia
New Zealand
3–2
Australia

New Caledonia
Round robin
Fiji
4
1986  New Zealand
Chinese Taipei
4–1
Australia

New Zealand
0–0 (a.e.t.)
(3–1 p)

New Zealand B
4
1989  Australia
Chinese Taipei
1–0
New Zealand

Australia[A]
Round robin[A]
Australia B[A]
5
1991  Australia
New Zealand
Round robin
Australia

Papua New Guinea
N/A 3
1994  Papua New Guinea
Australia
Round robin
New Zealand

Papua New Guinea
N/A 3
1998  New Zealand
Australia
3–1
New Zealand

Papua New Guinea
7–1
Fiji
6
2003  Australia
Australia
Round robin
New Zealand

Papua New Guinea
Round robin
Samoa
5
2007  Papua New Guinea
New Zealand
Round robin
Papua New Guinea

Tonga
Round robin
Solomon Islands
4
2010  New Zealand
New Zealand
11–0
Papua New Guinea

Cook Islands
2–0
Solomon Islands
8
2014  Papua New Guinea
New Zealand
Round robin
Papua New Guinea

Cook Islands
Round robin
Tonga
4
2018  New Caledonia TBD TBD 8

Notes

  1. ^ a b c The third place play-off scheduled to take place between Australia and Australia B was cancelled due to waterlogged pitch, so their group standings are used.[3]

Teams reaching the top four[edit]

Team Champions Runners-up Third-place Fourth-place
 New Zealand 5 (1983, 1991, 2007, 2010, 2014) 4 (1989, 1994, 1998, 2003) 1 (1983)
 Australia 1 3 (1994, 1998, 2003) 3 (1983, 1986, 1991) 1 (1989)
 Chinese Taipei 2 (1986, 1989)
 Papua New Guinea 3 (2007, 2010, 2014) 4 (1991, 1994, 1998, 2003)
 Cook Islands 2 (2010, 2014)
 Tonga 1 (2007) 1 (2014)
 New Caledonia 1 (1983)
 Australia B 1 (1989)
 Fiji 2 (1983, 1998)
 Solomon Islands 2 (2007, 2010)
 Samoa 1 (2003)
 New Zealand B 1 (1986)

Participating nations[edit]

A total of 15 teams have participated in the tournament, including all 11 current full OFC members (associate members are not allowed entry). Additionally, former OFC members Australia and Chinese Taipei previously participated. The secondary teams of Australia and New Zealand also each participated once.

India were set to enter the 1989 tournament as invited guests, but withdrew after being refused permission to participate by the Indian government.

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • GS – Group stage
  • q – Qualified
  •  •  – Did not qualify
  •  ×  – Withdrew
  •   No longer OFC member
  •     — Hosts
Team New Caledonia
1983
New Zealand
1986
Australia
1989
Australia
1991
Papua New Guinea
1994
New Zealand
1998
Australia
2003
Papua New Guinea
2007
New Zealand
2010
Papua New Guinea
2014
New Caledonia
2018
Total
 New Zealand 1st 3rd 2nd 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 1st 1st 1st q 11
 Papua New Guinea × 5th 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 2nd 2nd 2nd q 9
 Australia[a] 2nd 2nd 3rd[b] 2nd 1st 1st 1st 7
 Cook Islands 5th × 3rd 3rd q 4
 Fiji 4th 4th × × GS q 4
 Tonga × 3rd GS 4th q 4
 Samoa GS 4th × q 3
 Chinese Taipei[a] 1st 1st 2
 New Caledonia 3rd[c] × q 2
 Solomon Islands 4th 4th 2
 Tahiti × × GS q 2
 American Samoa GS × 1
 Australia B[a][d] 4th[b] 1
 New Zealand B[d] 4th 1
 Vanuatu × × GS 1

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Former OFC member, but now a member of the Asian Football Confederation.
  2. ^ a b The third place play-off scheduled to take place between Australia and Australia B was cancelled due to waterlogged pitch, so their group standings are used.
  3. ^ New Caledonia participated and hosted the tournament in 1983, but were not a member of the OFC or FIFA until 2004.
  4. ^ a b Secondary national team.

Records and statistics[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New Zealand collect Canada 2015 ticket". FIFA. 29 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014. 
  2. ^ "Oceania Cup (Women)". RSSSF. Retrieved 26 January 2013. 
  3. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tableso/oc-women89.html

External links[edit]