OKO

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OKO
ОКО
OKO Towers2016.jpg
General information
StatusComplete
TypeMixed-use
Architectural stylePostmodernism
LocationMoscow International Business Center
Moscow, Russia
Coordinates55°44′58.48″N 37°32′3.69″E / 55.7495778°N 37.5343583°E / 55.7495778; 37.5343583Coordinates: 55°44′58.48″N 37°32′3.69″E / 55.7495778°N 37.5343583°E / 55.7495778; 37.5343583
Construction started2011
Completed2015 (North and South Tower)
2017 (Parking)
CostUS$1-1.2 billion[1]
OwnerCapital Group [2]
Height
Roof354.1 m (South Tower)
245 m (North Tower)
44 m (Parking)
Technical details
Floor count85 (South Tower)
49 (North Tower)
12 (Parking)
Floor area249,600 m2 (2,687,000 sq ft)
Design and construction
ArchitectSkidmore, Owings and Merrill
DeveloperCapital Group
Structural engineerSkidmore, Owings and Merrill

OKO (Russian: ОКО, literally means eye, also an abbreviation for Ob"yedinonnyye Kristallom Osnovaniya (Russian: Oбъединённые Кристаллом Oснования, literally means Joined by Crystal Foundation)) is a complex of two skyscrapers located on plot 16 in the Moscow International Business Center (MIBC) in Moscow, Russia. Occupying a total area of about 250,000 square metres (2,700,000 sq ft), the mixed-use complex houses apartments, office space, a 5-star hotel, and other commodities.[3][4][5][6]

The two skyscrapers, North Tower and South Tower, are among the tallest skyscrapers in Russia, with the latter being the taller of the two. Rising 354.1 m (1,162 ft), the 85-story South Tower, also known as the OKO Apartment Tower or 16a IBC Tower 1, was the tallest building in Russia and Europe when constructed, until it was surpassed by Federation Tower a few months later. The 49-story North Tower, also known as the OKO Office Tower or 16a IBC Tower 2, is 245 m (804 ft) tall and the 11th tallest building in Russia. The complex also has a large car park, rising 12 stories with a height of 44 m (144 ft).[3][4][5][6][7][8]

History[edit]

The OKO complex from the ground

Construction of the OKO complex started in 2011.[3][4][5][6][7][8]

In the summer of 2014, the South Tower of the OKO complex surpassed the height of the neighboring Mercury City Tower (also in the MIBC) as the tallest building in Russia and Europe, only to be surpassed by the neighboring Vostok/East Tower of the Federation Towers (also in the MIBC) in November 2014, only a few months later. It was also during this period the OKO was the tallest building made of reinforced concrete.[9]

On 28 November 2015, the OKO complex was completed and put into operation.[10]

On 27 July 2016, the Government of Moscow purchased from the owner of OKO, Capital Group, 55,000 m² of space in one of the towers of the OKO complex at a cost estimated at 14.3 billion rubles.[11][12][13]

On 16 December 2016, the tallest skating rink in Europe opened on the roof of the South Tower of the OKO complex at a height of 354 m (1,161 ft).[14][15]

Design[edit]

Overview[edit]

The facades of the complex are connected with diagonal folds and are linked by a faceted base, giving a noticeable shard effect that defines the towers' appearance. In addition, the towers' canted folds allow each other to recede from one another as they rise. The complex forms an L-shaped composition at the ground plane that is pulled to perimeter of the site. This placement and the facade folds both allow the building to lean over the nearby Third Ring Road. A landscaped plaza sits at the base of the buildings and creates a sheltered, private garden that guides occupants to separate lobbies, in addition to give public space to pedestrians to rest. The building’s all-glass facade offers several features that benefit its occupants. Ventilated mullions can be opened manually to allow natural air flow into the interior. These mullions also help to mitigate stack effect. These features also allow the complex to give out a dynamic and shifting exterior.[8]

In addition, the 28th and 49th floors of the North Tower and the 7th, 27th, 46th, 65th and 83th floors of the South Tower have entresol, so it can be counted 51 and 90 floors in those buildings accordingly.[6]

Features[edit]

The South Tower is used as a residential building and a hotel. The building also has a skating rink on its roof, the tallest in Europe at a height of 354 m (1,161 ft). The North Tower is used as an office. The complex also has a restaurant and a fitness center.[3][4][5][6][14][15]

Construction gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Сезонный каток откроют на крыше небоскреба "ОКО" в "Москве-Сити"". interfax.ru. 28 September 2016.
  2. ^ "OKO - Capital Group". capitalgroup.ru.
  3. ^ a b c d "Oko Business Centre Complex - The Skyscraper Center". www.skyscrapercenter.com. Retrieved 2018-06-25.
  4. ^ a b c d GmbH, Emporis. "OKO Apartment Tower, Moscow | 1193732 | EMPORIS". www.emporis.com. Retrieved 2018-06-25.
  5. ^ a b c d GmbH, Emporis. "OKO Office Tower, Moscow | 1193733 | EMPORIS". www.emporis.com. Retrieved 2018-06-25.
  6. ^ a b c d e "OKO Towers, Moscow - SkyscraperPage.com". skyscraperpage.com. Retrieved 2018-06-25.
  7. ^ a b "OKO - Office Tower - The Skyscraper Center". www.skyscrapercenter.com. Retrieved 2018-06-28.
  8. ^ a b c "OKO - Residential Tower - The Skyscraper Center". www.skyscrapercenter.com. Retrieved 2018-06-28.
  9. ^ "OKO Towers, Moscow - SkyscraperPage.com". skyscraperpage.com. Retrieved 2018-06-28.
  10. ^ "A skyscraper with luxurious apartments and a parking lot is put in operation in Moscow City". Construction.RU - Russia-wide construction online journal (in Russian). Retrieved 2018-06-28.
  11. ^ "Московские чиновники переедут в башню "Око"". rambler.ru.
  12. ^ ""Око" для мэрии". 27 July 2016. p. 7 – via Kommersant.
  13. ^ "Московская мэрия купила полбашни "Око" в "Москва-Сити" - Forbes.ru". www.forbes.ru.
  14. ^ a b Staff, AOL. "One of the world's highest skating rinks just opened and it has incredible views". aol.com.
  15. ^ a b RT (16 December 2016). "Close to the sky: Drone footage of skating rink atop Moscow skyscraper at 354m" – via YouTube.

External links[edit]