Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory
National Observatory of Llano del Hato.jpg
Observatory code 303 Edit this on Wikidata
Location Mérida, Venezuela Edit this at Wikidata
Coordinates Coordinates: 8°47′11″N 70°52′19″W / 8.78639°N 70.87189°W / 8.78639; -70.87189
Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory is located in Venezuela
Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory
Location of Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory
Commons page Related media on Wikimedia Commons

The Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory (Spanish: OAN de Llano del Hato, or Observatorio Astronómico Nacional de Llano del Hato, code: 303) is an astronomical observatory in Venezuela. It is 3600 meters above sea level and is the country's main observatory. It is situated above the village of Llano del Hato in the Venezuelan Andes, not far from Apartaderos which lies about 50 kilometers north-east of Mérida, Mérida State.

Description[edit]

This facility is the closest major optical observatory to the equator lying at 8 degrees and 47.51 minutes north. It therefore has access to most parts of both the northern and southern skies. It benefits from a very dark site, and its altitude of 3,600 meters (12,000 feet) above sea level means atmospheric turbulence is greatly reduced.

The observatory is under the auspices of the Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia (CIDA), the main astronomical research body in Venezuela. CIDA conducts many projects in collaboration with other research organizations, academic institutions and international bodies. It also conducts valuable research in its own right and has a record that includes several important discoveries.

There are four large optical telescopes, each in its own cupola or dome: a 1-m Askania Schmidt camera (one of the largest telescopes of this type in the world), a 65-cm Zeiss refractor, a 1-m Zeiss reflector and a 50-cm Askania double astrograph. These instruments were acquired by the Venezuelan government 1954 and installed at Llano del Hato in early 1955. The observatory also has a museum and exhibition centre where visitors can learn about the work of the observatory and CIDA as well as astronomy in general.

The Quasar Equatorial Survey Team (QUEST) project is a joint venture between Yale University, Indiana University, and CIDA to photographically survey the sky. It now uses the 48 inch (1.22-m) aperture Samuel Oschin telescope at the Palomar Observatory with a digital camera, an array of 112 charge-coupled devices. Previously, it used the 1.0-metre Schmidt telescope of the Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory.

List of discovered minor planets[edit]

At OAN de Llano del Hato, Mérida, a total of 50 minor planets have been discovered and credited to the astronomers Orlando Naranjo, Jürgen Stock, Ignacio Ferrín and Carlos Leal:[1]

9357 Venezuela 11 January 1992 list[A]
(9605) 1992 AP3 11 January 1992 list[A]
(10344) 1992 CA2 12 February 1992 list[A][B]
(11089) 1994 CS8 8 February 1994 list[A]
11193 Mérida 11 December 1998 list[A]
12359 Cajigal 22 September 1993 list[A]
12360 Unilandes 22 September 1993 list[A]
12366 Luisapla 8 February 1994 list[A]
12367 Ourinhos 8 February 1994 list[A]
12758 Kabudari 22 September 1993 list[A]
(14005) 1993 SO3 22 September 1993 list[A]
(14918) 1994 BP4 21 January 1994 list[A]
15050 Heddal 12 December 1998 list[A]
15453 Brasileirinhos 12 December 1998 list[A]
(16565) 1992 CZ1 12 February 1992 list[A][B]
16645 Aldalara 22 September 1993 list[A]
17494 Antaviana 11 January 1992 list[A]
(17873) 1998 XO96 11 December 1998 list[A]
(23501) 1992 CK1 12 February 1992 list[A][B]
(29691) 1998 XH96 11 December 1998 list[A]
(29692) 1998 XE97 11 December 1998 list[A]
(31384) 1998 XE96 11 December 1998 list[A]
(31385) 1998 XF96 11 December 1998 list[A]
(35678) 1998 XW96 11 December 1998 list[A]
38628 Huya 10 March 2000 list[C]
(48565) 1994 CA9 8 February 1994 list[A]
(49430) 1998 XZ96 11 December 1998 list[A]
(56065) 1998 XB97 12 December 1998 list[A]
(59151) 1998 XK96 12 December 1998 list[A]
(66189) 1998 XA97 12 December 1998 list[A]
74400 Streaky 11 December 1998 list[A]
79864 Pirituba 11 December 1998 list[A]
79889 Maloka 8 January 1999 list[A]
(91210) 1998 XS96 11 December 1998 list[A]
(96609) 1999 AQ35 9 January 1999 list[A]
(120997) 1998 XT96 11 December 1998 list[A]
127870 Vigo 24 March 2003 list[C][D]
128166 Carora 27 August 2003 list[C][D]
(137096) 1998 XG97 11 December 1998 list[A]
149528 Simónrodríguez 24 March 2003 list[C][D]
159776 Eduardoröhl 2 May 2003 list[C][D]
161278 Cesarmendoza 24 March 2003 list[C][D]
189310 Polydamas 3 January 2006 list[C]
196476 Humfernandez 2 May 2003 list[C][D]
201497 Marcelroche 2 May 2003 list[C][D]
(237422) 1999 AF35 9 January 1999 list[A]
347940 Jorgezuluaga 30 March 2003 list[C][D]
366272 Medellín 30 March 2003 list[C][D]
(368628) 2004 UJ10 20 October 2004 list[E]
(423624) 2005 WZ156 27 November 2005 list[C]
Co-discovery made with:
A O. A. Naranjo
B J. Stock
C I. R. Ferrín
D C. Leal
E anomaly in MPC's data base as discovery observation was made by A84 in Turkey

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 11 June 2017. Retrieved 24 June 2017. 

External links[edit]