Occupational hazard

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the album, see Occupational Hazard.
At-risk workers without appropriate safety equipment

An occupational hazard is a hazard experienced in the workplace. Occupational hazards can encompass many types of hazards, including chemical hazards, biological hazards (biohazards), psychosocial hazards, and physical hazards. In the United States, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provide standards and guidelines to ensure worker safety against hazards in a variety of occupations,[1][2] and in the EU a similar role is taken by EU-OSHA.

Chemical hazards[edit]

Main article: Chemical hazard

Chemical hazards are a subtype of occupational hazards that involve dangerous chemicals. Exposure to chemicals in the workplace can cause acute or long-term detrimental health effects. There are many classifications of hazardous chemicals, including neurotoxins, immune agents, dermatologic agents, carcinogens, reproductive toxins, systemic toxins, asthmagens, pneumoconiotic agents, and sensitizers.[3]

NIOSH sets recommended exposure limits (REL's) as well as recommends preventative measures on specific chemicals in order to reduce or eliminate negative health effects from exposure to those chemicals.[4] Additionally, NIOSH keeps an index of chemical hazards based on their chemical name,[5] Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS No.),[6] and RTECS Number.[7]

Biological hazards[edit]

Main article: Biological hazard

Biological agents, including microorganisms and toxins produced by living organisms, can cause health problems in workers. Influenza is an example of a biohazard which affects a broad population of workers.[8]

Those who work outdoors encounter numerous biological hazards, including bites and stings from insects, spiders, snakes and scorpions,[9][10][11] contact dermatitis from exposure to urushiol from poisonous Toxicodendron plants,[12] Lyme disease,[13] West Nile virus,[14] and coccidioidomycosis.[15] According to NIOSH, outdoor workers at risk for these hazards "include farmers, foresters, landscapers, groundskeepers, gardeners, painters, roofers, pavers, construction workers, laborers, mechanics, and any other workers who spend time outside."[12]

Health care professionals are at risk to exposure to blood-borne illnesses (such as HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C)[16] and particularly to emerging infectious diseases, especially when not enough resources are available to control the spread of the disease.[17] Veterinary health workers, including veterinarians, are at risk for exposure to zoonotic disease.[18] Those who do clinical work in the field or in a laboratory risk exposure to West Nile virus if performing necropsies on birds affected by the virus or are otherwise working with infected tissue.[14]

Other occupations at risk to biological hazard exposure include poultry workers, who are exposed to bacteria;[19] and tattooists and piercers, who risk exposure to blood-borne pathogens.[20]

Psychosocial hazards[edit]

Main article: Psychosocial hazard

Psychosocial hazards are occupational hazards that affect someone's social life or psychological health. Psychosocial hazards in the workplace include occupational burnout and occupational stress, which can lead to burnout.[21]

Physical hazards[edit]

Main article: Physical hazard

Physical hazards are a subtype of occupational hazards that involve environmental hazards that can cause harm with or without contact. Physical hazards include ergonomic hazards, radiation, heat and cold stress, vibration hazards, and noise hazards.[22]

Noise[edit]

Each year in the US, twenty-two million workers are exposed to noise levels that could potentially harm their health.[23] In fact, occupational hearing loss is the most common occupational illness in the manufacturing sector.[24] Naturally, workers in certain fields, such as musicians,[25] mine workers,[26] and even those involved with stock car racing,[27] are exposed to higher levels of noise and therefore are at a higher risk of developing hearing loss.

While permanent, noise-induced hearing loss is very preventable.[28] As such a widespread issue, NIOSH has been committed to preventing future hearing loss for workers by establishing recommended exposure limits (RELs) of 85 dB(A) for an 8-house time-weighed average (TWA).[29] Furthermore, the Buy Quiet program was developed by NIOSH to encourage employers to reduce workplace noise levels by purchasing quieter models of tools and machinery.[30][31] Additionally, a partnership with the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA) has resulted in the creation of the Safe-in-Sound Award to recognize excellence and innovation in the field of hearing loss prevention.[32][33]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About OSHA". United States Department of Labor. Retrieved 2016-06-24. 
  2. ^ "About NIOSH". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2016-06-24. 
  3. ^ "CDC - Chemical Safety - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  4. ^ "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards" (PDF). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. September 2007. Retrieved June 29, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Index of Chemical Names, Synonyms and Trade Names". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved June 29, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Index of Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Numbers (CAS No.)". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved June 29, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Index of RTECS Numbers". Centers for Disease Control and Preveniton. Retrieved June 29, 2016. 
  8. ^ "CDC - Seasonal Influenza (Flu) in the Workplace - Guidance - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  9. ^ "CDC - Insects and Scorpions - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  10. ^ "CDC - Venomous Snakes - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  11. ^ "CDC - Venomous Spiders - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  12. ^ a b "CDC - Poisonous Plants - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  13. ^ "CDC - Lyme Disease - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  14. ^ a b "CDC - West Nile Virus - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  15. ^ "CDC - Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis) - Jobs at Risk - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  16. ^ "CDC - Bloodborne Infectious Diseases - HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis B Virus, and Hepatitis C Virus - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  17. ^ "CDC - Emerging Infectious Diseases - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  18. ^ "CDC - Veterinary Health Care: Biological Safety - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  19. ^ "CDC - Poultry Industry Workers - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  20. ^ "CDC - Body Art - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  21. ^ "CDC - Stress at Work - NIOSH Workplace Safety and Health Topic". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  22. ^ "Susan Harwood Grant Products By Topic". www.osha.gov. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  23. ^ "Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention: Facts and Statistics". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2016-06-24. 
  24. ^ "Occupationally-Induced Hearing Loss". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. March 2010. Retrieved 2016-06-24. 
  25. ^ Kardous, Chuck; Morata, Thais; Themann, Christa; Spears, Patricia; Afanuh, Sue (July 7, 2015). "Turn it Down: Reducing the Risk of Hearing Disorders Among Musicians". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved June 24, 2016. 
  26. ^ "Mining Topic: Hearing Loss Prevention Overview". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2016-06-24. 
  27. ^ Kardous, Chucri; Morata, Thais (August 16, 2010). "High Speeds, Higher Decibels". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved June 24, 2016. 
  28. ^ "They're Your Ears: Protect Them" (PDF). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. October 2007. Retrieved June 24, 2016. 
  29. ^ Kardous, Chuck; Themann, Christa; Morata, Thais; Lotz, Gregory (February 8, 2016). "Understanding Noise Exposure Limits: Occupational vs. General Environmental Noise". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved June 24, 2016. 
  30. ^ "Buy Quiet". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2016-06-24. 
  31. ^ Hudson, Heidi; Hayden, Chuck (November 4, 2011). "Buy Quiet". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved June 24, 2016. 
  32. ^ "Safe-in-Sound: Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Award". Safe-in-Sound. Retrieved June 24, 2016. 
  33. ^ Morata, Thais; Johnson, Ryan (January 11, 2011). "These Go to Eleven". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved June 24, 2016.