Oceania Chess Championship

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Leading chess players from the FIDE Oceania Zone 3.6 are allowed to play in the Oceania Chess Championships.[1][2] The tournament is conducted by the FIDE Oceania Zone President and Oceania Chess Confederation under the auspices of the world chess federation, FIDE.[3]

History[edit]

Before January 2012, the Oceania Chess Championship was scheduled as part of the FIDE World Chess Championship cycle, and winners qualified to represent the FIDE Oceania Zone at the Chess World Cup. Since 2012 the Oceania Chess Championship has been held every year, with only each alternate (odd numbered) year acting as the Oceania Zone Championship and Chess World Cup qualifier. In these years, the title of International Master (IM) is awarded to the winner(s) of the Oceania Zone Championship event, as per the FIDE title regulations.[4]

The first Oceania Chess Championship was organised by the inaugural Oceania Zone President, Graeme Gardiner, on the Gold Coast, Australia in 1999. Vladimir Feldman of Australia won the event, undefeated, with a score of 7/9. In May 2000, an additional Oceania Zonal Chess Championship was held to coincide with changes in the schedule of the FIDE World Chess Championship cycle. Only an open event was held that year, without a separate women's championship, and was won by Aleksandar Wohl with a score of 7.5/9.

In 2001, Mikhail Gluzman and Mark Chapman shared first place with a score of 7/9, but the former won a rapid chess play-off match and the title. In 2011 the Women's event resulted in a tie between Irina Berezina and Emma Guo. A playoff match was held later in the year in Sydney, and was won by Berezina with a score of 2.5/3. The 2013 Women's event again resulted in a tie between Irina Berezina and Emma Guo. Berezina won the playoff match, at the end of the tournament, with a score of 2/2. In 2015, untitled player Brodie McClymont beat IM Max Illingworth in the last round to catch him for 1st= with scores of 7.5/9, which means an automatic IM title. Illingworth beat McClymont 1.5–0.5 in the rapid chess playoff match for Zonal Champion.

Oceania Chess Champions[edit]

Year City Open Champion Women's Champion
1999[5][6] Gold Coast  Vladimir Feldman (Australia)  Laura Moylan (Australia)
2000[7][8][9] Auckland  Aleksandar Wohl (Australia)
2001[10][11][12] Gold Coast  Mikhail Gluzman (Australia)  Ngan Phan-Koshnitsky (Australia)
2002[13][14] Coral Coast  Darryl Johansen (Australia)  Irina Berezina (Australia)
2005[15][16] Auckland  Gary Lane (Australia)  Irina Berezina (Australia)
2007[17] Denarau  Zong-Yuan Zhao (Australia)  Irina Berezina (Australia)
2009[18][19][20][21] Gold Coast  David Smerdon (Australia)  Arianne Caoili (Australia)
2011[22] Rotorua  Zong-Yuan Zhao (Australia)  Irina Berezina (Australia)
2012[23] Queenstown  Darryl Johansen (Australia)  Helen Milligan (New Zealand)
2013[24][25][26] Nadi  Igor Bjelobrk (Australia)  Irina Berezina (Australia)
2014 Ballarat  Christopher Wallis (Australia)  Vineetha Wijesuriya (Australia)
2015 Sydney  Max Illingworth (Australia)  Emma Guo (Australia)
2016 Auckland  Alexei Kulashko (New Zealand)  Heather Richards (Australia)
2017 Auckland Anton Smirnov  Layla Timergazi (New Zealand)

Oceania Senior Chess Champions[edit]

Year City Senior Champion Senior Women's Champion
2010[27] Christchurch  Brian Jones (Australia)  Vivian Smith (New Zealand)
2011[28] Melbourne  Mirko Rujevic (Australia)  Vivian Smith (New Zealand)
2012[29][30] Parramatta  Anthonie Luchtmeijer (Australia)  Helen Milligan (New Zealand)
2013[31] Christchurch  David Lovejoy (Australia)  Helen Milligan (New Zealand)
2014 Sydney  Gary Lane (Australia)  Vivian Smith (New Zealand)
2015 Auckland  Leonard McLaren (New Zealand)  Helen Milligan (New Zealand)
2016 Nadi Gary Lane
2017

Oceania Presidents[edit]

Year President
1998-2002 Graeme Gardiner (Australia)
2002-2010 Gary Bekker (Australia)
2010-2014 Brian Jones (Australia)
2014- Paul Spiller (New Zealand)

References[edit]

  1. ^ World Chess Championship Regulations FIDE Handbook
  2. ^ Zonal Chess Championship Regulations FIDE Handbook
  3. ^ FIDE Zone 3.6 Draft Regulations Oceania Chess Confederation
  4. ^ FIDE International Title Regulations from www.fide.com
  5. ^ The World Chess Championship Zonals 1998-99 Mark Weeks
  6. ^ The Week in Chess 233, 26 April 1999 Mark Crowther
  7. ^ The World Chess Championship Zonals 2000-2001 Mark Weeks
  8. ^ The Week in Chess 290, 29 May 2000 Mark Crowther
  9. ^ ACF Bulletin No. 67, 28 May 2000 Australian Chess Federation
  10. ^ The World Chess Championship Zonals 2001-2002 Mark Weeks
  11. ^ The Week in Chess 338, 30 April 2001 Mark Crowther
  12. ^ ACF Bulletin No. 114 – 29 April 2001 Australian Chess Federation
  13. ^ The World Chess Championship Zonals 2002-2004 Mark Weeks
  14. ^ The Week in Chess 392, 13 May 2002 Mark Crowther
  15. ^ The World Chess Championship Zonals 2004-2005 Mark Weeks
  16. ^ The Week in Chess 535, 7 Feb 2005 Mark Crowther
  17. ^ Oceania Zonal 2007 ChessChat forum
  18. ^ The World Chess Championship Zonals 2008-2009 Mark Weeks
  19. ^ The Week in Chess 764, 29 Jun 2009 Mark Crowther
  20. ^ 2009 Oceania Zonal Championship report from www.fide.com
  21. ^ 2009 Oceania Women's Zonal Championship report from www.fide.com
  22. ^ 2011 Oceania Zonal Championship official web page
  23. ^ 2012 Queenstown Chess Classic official web page
  24. ^ 2013 Oceania Zonal Championship results from www.chessdom.com
  25. ^ 2013 Oceania Zonal Championship results from www.chess-results.com
  26. ^ 2013 Oceania Womens Zonal results from www.chess-results.com
  27. ^ 2010 NZ Senior Championship report from www.fide.com
  28. ^ 2011 Oceania Senior Championship report from www.fide.com
  29. ^ 2012 Asian Senior Championship report from www.fide.com
  30. ^ Luchtmeijer wins Asian Seniors from www.fide.com
  31. ^ 2013 Oceania Senior Championship final standings from www.chesschat.org

External links[edit]