October 1922

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The following events occurred in October 1922:

October 1, 1922 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Fascists in Italy marched on Bolzano demanding the resignation of its German-speaking mayor, the introduction of Italian into schools and public offices, and bilingualism on all public signs and notices. By October 3 they had complete control of the city.[1][2]
  • American-born dancer Isadora Duncan and her husband the Russian poet Sergei Yesenin were detained trying to enter the United States. They were not allowed to enter until authorities were satisfied that they had not come for the purposes of spreading communist propaganda.[3][4]
  • Born: Burke Marshall, civil rights lawyer, in Plainfield, New Jersey (d. 2003); Chen-Ning Yang, Chinese-born American physicist and Nobel laureate, in Hefei

October 2, 1922 (Monday)[edit]

  • Soviet Russia introduced conscription for all male citizens upon reaching the age of 20.[5]
  • Isadora Duncan and Sergei Yesenin were permitted to enter the United States after being detained at Ellis Island for twenty-four hours.[4]

October 3, 1922 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 4, 1922 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The Austrian government signed the Geneva Protocol, securing a major loan in exchange for renouncing a political alliance with Germany.[6]
  • Ireland offered an amnesty to all irregulars who voluntarily surrendered their arms and ceased to engage in rebellious activities before October 15.[7]
  • The Allied and Turkish representatives at Mudanya agreed to allow Turkey to have all of Thrace and to place Constantinople under joint control.[8]
  • Fascists seized control of Trento.[1]

October 5, 1922 (Thursday)[edit]

October 6, 1922 (Friday)[edit]

October 7, 1922 (Saturday)[edit]

October 8, 1922 (Sunday)[edit]

October 9, 1922 (Monday)[edit]

October 10, 1922 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 11, 1922 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The Armistice of Mudanya was signed. Greece was to recognize Turkish claims to Smyrna and eastern Thrace and was given 15 days to withdraw west of the Maritsa River.[15]
  • A mass exodus began in Thrace, as Greeks and Armenians who feared living under the Turks fled westward.[18]
  • Fascists invaded the offices of the Housing Commissioner in Rome and had all the women clerks dismissed and replaced with ex-service men. The Fascists sent a letter to Prime Minister Facta stating they had taken justice into their own hands.[19]

October 12, 1922 (Thursday)[edit]

October 13, 1922 (Friday)[edit]

October 14, 1922 (Saturday)[edit]

October 15, 1922 (Sunday)[edit]

October 16, 1922 (Monday)[edit]

  • Ambassador Auckland Geddes informed the United States that Britain rejected the American proposal to be given the right to search British ships up to twelve miles from American shores.[24]
  • The construction of the 30 cm Irving Porter Church Memorial Telescope was completed at Cornell University's Fuertes Observatory.[25]

October 17, 1922 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 18, 1922 (Wednesday)[edit]

October 19, 1922 (Thursday)[edit]

October 20, 1922 (Friday)[edit]

October 21, 1922 (Saturday)[edit]

October 22, 1922 (Sunday)[edit]

October 23, 1922 (Monday)[edit]

October 24, 1922 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Mussolini made a speech to his Blackshirt followers in Naples declaring, "Either we are allowed to govern, or we will seize power by marching on Rome."[32]
  • Former German chancellor Bernhard von Bülow gave his first interview in seven years, in which he said there was no chance for the monarchy to be restored in Germany because "The republican majority is stronger than the nationalists." Of the country's economic problems he said that they "may lead to local riots, but from all I know of the German people I can say that they are too fond of quiet and order to allow bolshevism to sway the country."[33]
  • Born: George Miller, politician, in Detroit, Michigan (d. 2014)
  • Died: George Cadbury, 83, British businessman and philanthropist

October 25, 1922 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The Fascists delivered an ultimatum demanding that the Italian government surrender all its powers to them or else they would enter Rome.[34]
  • Died: Oscar Hertwig, 73, German zoologist and professor

October 26, 1922 (Thursday)[edit]

October 27, 1922 (Friday)[edit]

October 28, 1922 (Saturday)[edit]

  • King Victor Emmanuel III refused to grant the request of the still-acting Prime Minister Luigi Facta to declare martial law, on advice from generals who warned that the army might not obey orders to fire on the Fascists. The king instead invited Mussolini to come to Rome to discuss the political situation.[38][39]
  • Born: Butch van Breda Kolff, basketball player and coach, in Glen Ridge, New Jersey (d. 2007)

October 29, 1922 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Mussolini departed Milan for Rome on an overnight train.[40]
  • Born: Neal Hefti, jazz trumpeter, composer, songwriter and arranger, in Hastings, Nebraska (d. 2008)

October 30, 1922 (Monday)[edit]

  • Mussolini arrived in Rome at 10:50 a.m., spoke with the king for an hour and then went to a hotel where he made a speech from the balcony, saying, "The Fascisti are completely victorious. I have come to Rome not only to give Italy a ministry but a true government. In a few hours you will have such a government. Long live King Victor Emmanuel! Long live victorious Italy! Long live the Fascisti!" By 3 p.m. the members of the coalition cabinet had been chosen, and at 7 p.m. Mussolini and his ministers were sworn in.[39][40][41]
  • The Frank Lloyd-directed film Oliver Twist starring Jackie Coogan and Lon Chaney was released.
  • Died: Géza Gárdonyi, 59, Hungarian writer and journalist

October 31, 1922 (Tuesday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cole, John W.; Wolf, Eric R. (1999). The Hidden Frontier: Ecology and Ethnicity in an Alpine Valley. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-520-92217-4.
  2. ^ "1922". Bolzano scomparsa. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  3. ^ "Isadora Duncan Very Angry As She and Russian Hubby Are Taken To Ellis Island". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. October 2, 1922. p. 1.
  4. ^ a b "Isadora, Peeced, Poet, Entranced, Pass Ellis Isle". Chicago Daily Tribune: 5. October 3, 1922.
  5. ^ "Tageseinträge für 2. Oktober 1922". chroniknet. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Chronology 1922". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  7. ^ Williams, Paul (October 4, 1922). "Ireland Offers Amnesty to Rebels Who Turn in Arms". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  8. ^ Wales, Henry (October 5, 1922). "Turks and Allies Sign Truce". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  9. ^ "Canada Forest Fires Kill 30". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 6, 1922. p. 1.
  10. ^ De Santo, V. (October 6, 1922). "Red Socialism Dies in Italy as Factions War". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  11. ^ "N. Y. Ball Fans Jeer Landis". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 6, 1922. p. 1.
  12. ^ Wilcox, Grafton (October 7, 1922). "Wet Ships Barred from U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  13. ^ Wilcox, Grafton (May 1, 1923). "Court Permits Liquor on U.S. Ships at Sea". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1.
  14. ^ "October 6, 1922 World Series Game 3, Yankees at Giants". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  15. ^ a b "1922". Music And History. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  16. ^ "Boy, 19, Arrested, Charged by Companion with Murder of Rector and Mrs. Mills". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. October 9, 1922. p. 1.
  17. ^ "Pig Woman Picks Hall Slayer Out of Depot Crowd". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. November 12, 1922.
  18. ^ Swift, Otis (October 12, 1922). "Million Exiles Flee Turks". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  19. ^ De Santo, V. (October 12, 1922). "Fascisti Join Italy Liberals; Crisis Averted". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12.
  20. ^ "Save All from Burned Pacific Liner". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 13, 1922. p. 1.
  21. ^ "Tageseinträge für 13. Oktober 1922". chroniknet. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  22. ^ "Rathenau Slayers Sentenced – 15 Years for Ernst Techow". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. October 14, 1922. p. 1.
  23. ^ Ryan, Thomas Stewart (October 16, 1922). "Roumania's King Dons Iron Crown". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  24. ^ "Britain Spurns 'Dry' Treaty". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 17, 1922. p. 1.
  25. ^ http://coursewiki.astro.cornell.edu/Fuertes/ChurchTelescopeDedication Retrieved 2015-10-15
  26. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 299. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  27. ^ a b Holston, Kim R. (2013). Movie Roadshows: A History and Filmography of Reserved-Seat Limited Showings, 1911–1973. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. pp. 28–29. ISBN 978-0-7864-6062-5.
  28. ^ "Fights to Rule Britain". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 20, 1922. p. 1.
  29. ^ Dille, J. Robert and Mohler, Stanley R. "The Beginnings: Past and Present." Fundamentals of Aerospace Medicine, Fourth Edition. Ed. Jeffrey R. Davis, Robert Johnson, Jan Stepanek and Jennifer A. Fogarty. Philadelphia: Lippimcott Williams & Wilkins, 2008. 6. ISBN 978-0-7817-7466-6
  30. ^ Steele, John (October 24, 1922). "Bonar Law to Give England the 'Rest Cure'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
  31. ^ "Germany Seeks Bankruptcy". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 24, 1922. p. 1.
  32. ^ Spielvogel, Jackson (2012). Western Civilization Since 1300, Eighth Edition. Wadsworth Cengage Learning. p. 823. ISBN 978-1-111-34219-7.
  33. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (October 25, 1922). "Prince Buelow Calls Monarchy Dead in Germany". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
  34. ^ "Mussolini". The Tablet. September 1, 1923. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  35. ^ Steele, John (October 27, 1922). "'Hoot, Mon!' Cry for Bonar Law; 'Ray for Davey!'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  36. ^ "Fascisti March on Rome". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 28, 1922. p. 1.
  37. ^ "Southern Rhodesia rejects joining the Union of South Africa". South African History Online. Retrieved June 15, 2015.
  38. ^ "Fascisti Boss Italy; Crowds Acclaim King". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 29, 1922. p. 1.
  39. ^ a b Clark, Martin (2014). Mussolini. New York: Routledge. pp. 58–59. ISBN 978-1-317-89840-5.
  40. ^ a b Barella, Luigi (October 31, 1922). "Italy Pledged by Fascisti to Peace Policy". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  41. ^ a b De Santo, V. (November 1, 1922). "10,000 Fascisti Make Triumphal Entry into Rome". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.