October 1926

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The following events occurred in October 1926:

October 1, 1926 (Friday)[edit]

October 2, 1926 (Saturday)[edit]

October 3, 1926 (Sunday)[edit]

October 4, 1926 (Monday)[edit]

  • 9,000 coal miners ended their labour dispute and returned to work in Britain, as reports appeared with increasing regularity of miners' representatives making local settlements with pit owners. Over 170,000 miners had gone back to work by this time.[3]
  • The Mexican rebellion spread to southern Guanajuato as former general Rodolfo Gallegos led an uprising there.[4]
  • Born: Senaida Wirth, baseball player, in Tampa, Florida (d. 1967)

October 5, 1926 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 6, 1926 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Pennsylvania blue laws from 1794 were invoked in Pittsburgh, banning all Sunday sports in the city of Pittsburgh.[5]

October 7, 1926 (Thursday)[edit]

October 8, 1926 (Friday)[edit]

  • German General Hans von Seeckt was forced to resign as head of the Reichswehr after republicans objected to his permitting Prince Wilhelm to take part in military maneuvers in the uniform of the old Imperial First Foot Guards without first getting permission from the government.[6]

October 9, 1926 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Benito Mussolini made himself the head of Italy's national militia, giving him personal command of all the armed forces in the country.[7]
  • Born: Ruth Ellis, murderer, in Rhyl, England (d. 1955)

October 10, 1926 (Sunday)[edit]

October 11, 1926 (Monday)[edit]

October 12, 1926 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • The Condé Diamond, a famous rose-coloured diamond that once belonged to the seventeenth century general Louis, Grand Condé, was stolen along with other valuables from the Condé Museum in Chantilly, France. Ladders were used to scale the exterior wall and the gem tower and the glass was cut from the windows.[11]

October 13, 1926 (Wednesday)[edit]

October 14, 1926 (Thursday)[edit]

October 15, 1926 (Friday)[edit]

October 16, 1926 (Saturday)[edit]

October 17, 1926 (Sunday)[edit]

October 18, 1926 (Monday)[edit]

October 19, 1926 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 20, 1926 (Wednesday)[edit]

October 21, 1926 (Thursday)[edit]

October 22, 1926 (Friday)[edit]

October 23, 1926 (Saturday)[edit]

October 24, 1926 (Sunday)[edit]

October 25, 1926 (Monday)[edit]

October 26, 1926 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Queen Marie of Romania's tour entered Canada with visits to Niagara Falls and Hamilton, Ontario.[21]
  • British Labour Party MP Alfred Salter was censured in the House of Commons for refusing to retract remarks of his that appeared in the Daily Express. "I am not prepared to withdraw, modify or apologise for anything I have said on this matter, and I propose to repeat the words I made use of and about which complaint has been made", Salter declared. "I said, and I repeat it here to-day, that I have seen members of all parties in this House, my own party I regret to say included, drunk in this House not on one occasion but on many." A motion was passed calling the statement "a gross libel on the Members of this House and a grave breach of its privileges."[14]

October 27, 1926 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • In a speech made before the American Association of Advertising Agencies and broadcast on the radio, President Calvin Coolidge said that American prosperity was the result of "our high rate of wages which brings about the greatest distribution of wealth that the world has ever seen and provides the enormous capacity for the consumption of all kinds of commodities which characterizes our country." He also said that while wages were high, "that means that the results of prosperity are going more and more into the homes of the land and less into the enrichment of the few, more and more to the men and women and less and less to the capital which is engaged in our economic life. If this were not so the country would not support 20 million automobiles, purchase so many radios, and install so many telephones."[30][31]

October 28, 1926 (Thursday)[edit]

October 29, 1926 (Friday)[edit]

October 30, 1926 (Saturday)[edit]

October 31, 1926 (Sunday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. pp. 346–347. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  2. ^ Barnhill, John H. "Jazz Age Evangelism". Jazz Age: People and Perspectives. Ed. Mitchell Newton-Maza and Peter C. Mancall. ABC CLIO, 2009. p. 68. ISBN 978-1-59884-033-9.
  3. ^ "British Miners". The Singleton Argus. Singleton, N.S.W.: 2. October 7, 1926.
  4. ^ Tuck, Jim (1997). "Cristero Rebellion: part 1 – toward the abyss". Mexconnect. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  5. ^ "Sunday Sports Barred by Law in Pittsburgh". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 7, 1926. p. 19.
  6. ^ "Germany Seeks Army Chief Who Pleases Allies". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 9, 1926. p. 12.
  7. ^ Clayton, John (October 10, 1926). "Mussolini's Rule of Italy Made Absolute". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 18.
  8. ^ Bowman, John Stewart, ed. (2000). Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture. Columbia University Press. p. 62. ISBN 0-231-11004-9.
  9. ^ Day, Donald (October 12, 1926). "Trotzky to Be Tried Oct. 20 for His Revolt". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  10. ^ "Guthrie Picked by Tories of Canada as New Leader". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 12, 1926. p. 20.
  11. ^ Wales, Henry (October 13, 1926). "$2,000,000 Pink Diamond Gone; Mystery". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  12. ^ "U.S. Supreme Court Rules Daylight Saving is Legal". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 14, 1926. p. 8.
  13. ^ "272 U.S. 525 – Massachusetts State Grange et al. v. Benton, Attorney General of Massachusetts, et al". Public.Resource.Org. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  14. ^ a b "Privilege (Complaint of Member's Speech)". Hansard. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  15. ^ Hedges, Inez (2005). Framing Faust: Twentieth Century Cultural Struggles. Carbondale, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press. p. 35. ISBN 0-8093-2903-4.
  16. ^ "Rioting at Port Talbot". The Barrier Miner. Broken Hill, N.S.W. October 18, 1926. p. 1.
  17. ^ "47 Injured When Mine Strikers Battle Police". Chicago Daily Tribune: 2. October 16, 1926.
  18. ^ a b "Chronology 1926". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  19. ^ "1,200 Killed as Shells Explode on Burning Ship". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 17, 1926. p. 20.
  20. ^ "Pope Beatifies 191 Martyrs of the French Revolt". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 18, 1926. p. 5.
  21. ^ a b c Wachalec, Stephanie (October 22, 2002). "Queen Marie's Trip to America and Canada". Queen Marie Collection. Kent State University. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  22. ^ a b Langum, David J. (1994). Crossing Over the Line: Legislating Morality and the Mann Act. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 93–94. ISBN 0-226-46870-4.
  23. ^ "Cuban Storm Deaths Now Set at 650". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 22, 1926. p. 1.
  24. ^ "Actors Forbidden to Make Jokes About Italian Army". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 22, 1926. p. 6.
  25. ^ Mikkelson, Barbara and David P. (September 2, 2014). "Punched Out". Snopes. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  26. ^ "Sacco and Vanzetti Denied New Trial". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 24, 1926. p. 1.
  27. ^ "The Standard Symphony". The Peabody Awards. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  28. ^ "Detroit – The Death of Harry Houdini". American Museum of Magic. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  29. ^ "Myers v. United States, 272 U.S. 52 (1926)". FindLaw. Thomson Reuters. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  30. ^ "Wages Boom U.S.: Coolidge". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 28, 1926. pp. 1–2.
  31. ^ Woolley, John; Peters, Gerhard. "Address Before the American Association of Advertising Agencies, Washington, D.C." The American Presidency Project. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  32. ^ Chen, John Shujie (2004). Rise and Fall of Fu Ren University, Beijing: Catholic Higher Education in China. New York: RoutledgeFalmer. ISBN 0-203-46394-3.
  33. ^ Röhl, John C.G. "The Unicorn in Winter: Kaiser Wilhelm II in Exile in the Netherlands, 1918–1941". Monarchy in Exile: The Politics of Legitimacy from Marie de Médicis to Wilhelm II. Ed. Philip Mansell and Torsten Riotte. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. p. 339.
  34. ^ "A Guide to the United States' History of Recognition, Diplomatic, and Consular Relations, by Country, Since 1776: Nicaragua". Office of the Historian. United States Department of State. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  35. ^ "Chamorro Bows to U.S.; Quits as Nicaragua Head". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 31, 1926. p. 27.
  36. ^ Newton, Michael (2014). Famous Assassinations in World History. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO. p. 346. ISBN 978-1-61069-285-4.