October 1934

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The following events occurred in October 1934:

October 1, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • The Foreign Press Association in Berlin delivered a message to Joseph Goebbels, asking him to "take the necessary steps in our mutual interests to protect foreign journalists henceforth against slanders and chicane, as we are convinced these happenings are unknown to you." The letter went on to state, "For some time there has been evidence of systematic action against foreign journalists residing here. Foreign journalists of distinction, both women and men, who for years within the limits of their own national possibilities reported on Germany with good will, hear their profession attacked at gatherings to which they have been invited. Moreover, the residences of members were recently searched disgracefully by members of the GSP. The fruitlessness of the searches does not alter the fact that the victims were disillusioned, if not embittered."[1]
  • The newspaper comic strip Life's Like That first appeared.
  • Born: Chuck Hiller, baseball player, in Johnsburg, Illinois (d. 2004); Shakeb Jalali, poet, in Aligarh, British India (d. 1966)

October 2, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 3, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

October 4, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

October 5, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

October 6, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

October 7, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

October 8, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • A one-day general strike was held in Cuba. The Communist Confederation of Labour in Cuba called it off that night after a day of rioting.[8]

October 9, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 10, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

October 11, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Nazi official August Jäger declared Regional Bishop Hans Meiser to be removed from office for resisting Ludwig Müller's control of the Protestant church. Thousands gathered around Meiser's church in Munich until the bishop came and addressed them. "I do not intend to retreat and I lodge protest here against the force being used against our church and I am unwilling to lay down the episcopal office conferred on me by our church", Meiser declared before proceeding to his house arrest.[10][11]
  • 1,200 coal miners in Pécs, Hungary went on an underground hunger strike and threatened to commit suicide by shutting off their air supply if their demands for higher wages were not met.[12][13]

October 12, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

  • Demonstrators gathered in the court of the episcopal palace in Munich to protest the removal of Bishop Meiser. The bishop stepped to the balcony but only spoke a few words of gratitude to the crowd before going back inside.[14]
  • The musical film The Gay Divorcee starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers was released.
  • Died: Willy Clarkson, 72 or 73, English costume designer and wigmaker

October 13, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Bavarian Protestants called off meetings and church services to protest the removal of Bishop Meiser. Pastors supporting Meiser had planned to distribute pamphlets among worshipers on Sunday, but the Gestapo seized the literature before it could be issued for distribution.[15]
  • Born: Nana Mouskouri, singer, in Chania, Crete, Greece

October 14, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

  • 16,000 pastors of the Protestant church bitterly assailed Ludwig Müller and the Nazi control of the churches. An opposition manifesto distributed to congregations said that Müller and August Jäger were responsible for "the triumph of violence and hypocrisy." The Reverend Martin Niemöller called it "ghastly and shocking how a few persons calling themselves Christian Protestants are persecuting the congregations of Christ."[16]

October 15, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

October 16, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • The Long March began in southwest China.[18]
  • The Hungarian coal miners ended their hunger strike after five days when the owners made concessions.[13]
  • All the ministers of the German cabinet swore oaths of loyalty to Hitler in the chancellery. Chief of the Reich Chancellery Hans Lammers then declared that the Weimar Constitution which Hitler swore to uphold when he became chancellor was canceled.[19]

October 17, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

Born in Muncie, Indiana on October 13, 1902, Harry Pierpont, 32 was executed in Ohio for killing Sheriff Jess Sarber while he was breaking John Dillinger out of jail in Lima, Ohio.

  • A congressional committee on un-American activities held a hearing in New York on the Friends of New Germany. 300 members of the organization interrupted the proceedings several times with jeers and shouts of "Heil Hitler". A fistfight almost broke out between Jews and Nazi sympathizers when the hearing let out into the hall.[20]
  • Born: Rico Rodriguez, ska and reggae trombonist, in Kingston, Jamaica (d. 2015)
  • Died: Santiago Ramón y Cajal, 82, Spanish histologist, neuroscientist and Nobel laureate.

October 18, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

October 19, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

  • The Little Entente and Balkan Entente issued identically-worded messages expressing solidarity with Yugoslavia and laying responsibility for the assassination of King Alexander upon terrorists urged on by the foreign policies of nations that were not named but were clearly indicated to be Hungary and Italy.[22]
  • Died: Alexander von Kluck, 88, German general

October 20, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

October 21, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

October 22, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

October 23, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 24, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

October 25, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

October 26, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

October 27, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

October 28, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

October 29, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • The Berne Trial opened in Switzerland. Jewish groups had lodged a civil complaint against Swiss Nazis for distributing a plagiarized version of the fraudulent anti-Semitic treatise The Protocols of the Elders of Zion in a party organ, despite a Swiss law prohibiting literature "calculated to excite vile instincts or to cause brutal offense."[34][35]
  • Died: Robert C. Pruyn, 87, American inventor, businessman and politician; Lou Tellegen, 52, Dutch-born actor, director and screenwriter (suicide)

October 30, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

October 31, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Foreign Writers Protest Against Slander by Nazis". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 2, 1934. p. 8. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Chronology 1934". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  3. ^ Kinsley, Philip (October 2, 1934). "Start Insull's Trial Today; to Last 4 Months". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  4. ^ "Howie Morenz NHL Statistics". Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Army Curbs Revolt in Spain". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 7, 1934. p. 1. 
  6. ^ Bader, Robert S. "Groucho Marx Chronology". Marx-Brothers.org. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Tageseinträge für 7. Oktober 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Cuban Radicals Call Off Strike; Rioting Subsides". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 9, 1934. p. 4. 
  9. ^ "Papal Legate Opens Congress with Peace Plea". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 11, 1934. p. 13. 
  10. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (October 12, 1934). "Riot Over Nazi Decree Ousting Bavarian Bishop". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 17. 
  11. ^ "Regional Church: Struggle for Autonomy". Widerstand? Evangelische Christinnen und Christen im Nationalsozialismus. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  12. ^ "1,000 Miners Launch Death Strike in Pit". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 14, 1934. p. 1. 
  13. ^ a b "1,200 Out of Mine; Raise Pay". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. October 16, 1934. 
  14. ^ "Bavarian Bishop Prisoner; Mob Taunts Hitler". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 13, 1934. p. 9. 
  15. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (October 14, 1934). "German Police Act to Smash Church Revolt". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10. 
  16. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (October 15, 1934). "16,000 German Pastors Attack Hitler". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  17. ^ "500,000 in Tears as King's Body Reaches Capital". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 16, 1934. p. 5. 
  18. ^ "This Day in History". History. A+E Networks. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  19. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (October 17, 1934). "Proclaim Hitler Nazi Germany's Ruler for Life". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 11. 
  20. ^ "Hitler Cheered and Fists Fly at Inquiry on Nazis". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 18, 1934. p. 20. 
  21. ^ Darrah, David (October 19, 1934). "Boy King Sits on Throne as His Father is Buried". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13. 
  22. ^ Darrah, David (October 20, 1934). "5 Balkan States Warn Europe is Close to a War". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2. 
  23. ^ Steele, John (October 20, 1934). "20 Planes Off for Australia for England". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  24. ^ "Philippines Hit by New Typhoon; Five are Killed". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 22, 1934. p. 3. 
  25. ^ "Fly 11,300 Miles in 70 HOurs". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 23, 1934. p. 1. 
  26. ^ Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 444. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  27. ^ Harrison, James P. (2000). Mastering the Sky: A History of Aviation from Ancient Times to the Present. Sarpedon Publishers. p. 136. ISBN 978-1-885119-68-1. 
  28. ^ Ruffin, Steven A. (2005). Aviation's Most Wanted: The Top 10 Book of Winged Wonders, Lucky Landings and Other Aerial Oddities. Dulles, Virginia: Potomac Books. ISBN 978-1-59797-444-8. 
  29. ^ Kennedy, Gregory P. (September 30, 2014). "Origins". Stratolab, an Evolutionary Stratospheric Balloon Project. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  30. ^ "Floods Are Menacin in West Washington; Record Rain Falls". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 26, 1934. p. 13. 
  31. ^ "German Bishop's Aid Resigns in Church Conflict". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 27, 1934. p. 7. 
  32. ^ "King, Shorn of Power, Resigns Siam's Throne". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 28, 1934. p. 1. 
  33. ^ "2 Film Actors in Fistic Duel in Coast Cafe". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 29, 1934. p. 3. 
  34. ^ "Jews Sue to Bar Claim They Seek to Rule All Men". Chicago Daily Tribune. October 29, 1934. p. 5. 
  35. ^ "Trace Disputed "Jewish Edicts" to Russ Agent". Chicago Daily Tribune: 19. October 30, 1934. 
  36. ^ "The Farmer Takes a Wife". Playbill Vault. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  37. ^ "Nazis Condemn Several to Die in Secret Trial". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 1, 1934. p. 1. 
  38. ^ "Fair Ends; 363,700 Bid Adieu". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 1, 1934. p. 1.