Odell, Nebraska

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Odell, Nebraska
Village
Downtown Odell: Main Street
Downtown Odell: Main Street
Location of Odell, Nebraska
Location of Odell, Nebraska
Coordinates: 40°3′1″N 96°48′3″W / 40.05028°N 96.80083°W / 40.05028; -96.80083Coordinates: 40°3′1″N 96°48′3″W / 40.05028°N 96.80083°W / 40.05028; -96.80083
Country United States
State Nebraska
County Gage
Area[1]
 • Total 0.26 sq mi (0.67 km2)
 • Land 0.26 sq mi (0.67 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,309 ft (399 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 307
 • Estimate (2016)[3] 300
 • Density 1,200/sq mi (460/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 68415
Area code(s) 402
FIPS code 31-35735[4]
GNIS feature ID 0831829[5]

Odell is a village in Gage County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 307 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

Odell is located at 40°3′1″N 96°48′3″W / 40.05028°N 96.80083°W / 40.05028; -96.80083 (40.050325, -96.800972).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.26 square miles (0.67 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 359
1910 427 18.9%
1920 403 −5.6%
1930 472 17.1%
1940 404 −14.4%
1950 420 4.0%
1960 358 −14.8%
1970 349 −2.5%
1980 322 −7.7%
1990 291 −9.6%
2000 345 18.6%
2010 307 −11.0%
Est. 2016 300 [3] −2.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 307 people, 133 households, and 90 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,180.8 inhabitants per square mile (455.9/km2). There were 143 housing units at an average density of 550.0 per square mile (212.4/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.4% White, 1.0% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races.

There were 133 households of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.6% were married couples living together, 9.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.3% were non-families. 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 15% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.82.

The median age in the village was 44.6 years. 26.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 2.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.2% were from 25 to 44; 26.7% were from 45 to 64; and 22.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 49.8% male and 50.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 345 people, 142 households, and 100 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,308.0 people per square mile (512.3/km²). There were 152 housing units at an average density of 576.3 per square mile (225.7/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 97.97% White and 2.03% Native American. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.45% of the population.

There were 142 households out of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.9% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the village, the population was spread out with 28.4% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 22.6% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 21.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 104.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.5 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the village was $30,875, and the median income for a family was $32,813. Males had a median income of $25,833 versus $23,250 for females. The per capita income for the village was $13,958. About 3.0% of families and 6.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.7% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

Before the southwest corner of Gage County was home to Odell, it was part of the 10-by-25-mile (16 by 40 km) Otoe Indian Reservation.[8] But a bill by U.S. Senator Algernon Paddock-and the subsequent move of the Otoes to Oklahoma-opened the area up for development.

The railroad made the first purchase of land through the reservation in the late 1870s, but no towns sprouted until William LaGorgue, who settled in southern Gage County, bought a large amount of the reservation. He founded the town of Charleston on the south side of Indian Creek, a village that sported a number of businesses, a school and about 20 farmers.

The Burlington Northern Railroad, however, chose to build its railroad track on the north side of the creek. The mile move was made by most Charleston residents to what would eventually become Odell, which was named by James D. Myers, the town's first banker. Myers offered to deed the family of the first-born baby in town a lot if he could name the baby. The name given was Frank LaGrande Odell Triska, after one of the owners of the Lincoln Land Company, which owned the land in town. It was decided to call the town Odell as well.

Odell supports many different businesses, varying from wood flooring production to photography.

School[edit]

The town is home to Diller-Odell High, which competes in the Pioneer Conference.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 11, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Odell, Gage County". Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. University of Nebraska. Retrieved 9 August 2014. 

External links[edit]