Odyssey Sims

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Odyssey Sims
Odyssey Sims.jpg
Sims in 2010.
No. 0 – Dallas Wings
Position Point guard
League WNBA
Personal information
Born (1992-07-13) July 13, 1992 (age 24)
Irving, Texas
Nationality American
Listed height 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Listed weight 155 lb (70 kg)
Career information
High school MacArthur (Irving, Texas)
College Baylor (2010–2014)
WNBA draft 2014 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2nd overall
Selected by the Tulsa Shock
Playing career 2014–present
Career history
2014–present Tulsa Shock / Dallas Wings
2014–2015 Bucheon KEB-Hana Bank (South Korea)
2015–present AGÜ Spor (Turkey)
Career highlights and awards
Stats at WNBA.com

Odyssey Celeste Sims (born July 13, 1992) is an American professional basketball guard for the Dallas Wings of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). She was an AP and WBCA All-American.[1][2] Sims was born in Irving, Texas. She graduated from MacArthur High School.[3]

Baylor statistics[edit]

Source[4]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
Year Team GP Points FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2010-11 Baylor 36 471 47.5 45.3 75.7 3.0 3.1 1.4 0.0 13.1
2011-12 Baylor 40 594 44.7 39.9 83.0 3.0 4.4 3.0 0.1 14.9
2012-13 Baylor 32 414 47.7 33.7 83.2 2.5 5.8 2.8 0.1 12.9
2013-14 Baylor 37 1054 44.6 39.8 80.8 4.6 4.6 2.0 0.1 28.5
Career Baylor 145 2533 45.7 40.3 81.0 3.3 4.4 2.3 0.1 17.5

USA Basketball[edit]

Sims played on the team representing the USA at the 2011 Summer Universiade held in Shenzhen, China. The team, coached by Bill Fennelly, won all six games to earn the gold medal. Sims averaged 6.2 points per game.[5]

Sims was selected to be a member of the team representing the USA at the 2013 Summer Universiade held in Kazan, Russia. The team, coached by Sherri Coale, won the opening four games easily, scoring in triple digits in each game, and winning by 30 or more points in each case. After winning the quarterfinal game against Sweden, they faced Australia in the semifinal. The USA team opened up as much as a 17 point in the fourth quarter of the game but the Australian team fought back and took a one-point lead in the final minute. Crystal Bradford scored a basket with 134 seconds left ant he game to secure a 79–78 victory. The gold medal opponent was Russia, but the USA team never trailed, and won 90–71 to win the gold medal and the World University games Championship. Sims was the third leading scorer for the team, averaging 12.7 points per game. She led the team in assists with 32, and steals with 12. She was named co-MVP of the tournament, along with Russia's Tatiana Grigoryeva.[6]

Awards and honors[edit]

Odyssey Sims winning Lieberman Award, presented at the 2014 WBCA Award ceremony

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WBB, Notre Dame Battle for NCAA Title - Baylor Bears Official Athletic Site". BaylorBears.com. Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
  2. ^ "USA Basketball: Odyssey Sims". Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Odyssey Sims 2010 High School Girls' Basketball Profile - ESPNHS". Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Women's Basketball Player stats". NCAA. Retrieved 25 Sep 2015. 
  5. ^ "Twenty-Sixth World University Games -- 2011". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on 7 September 2015. Retrieved 13 October 2015. 
  6. ^ "Twenty-Seventh World University Games -- 2013". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on 7 September 2015. Retrieved 13 October 2015. 
  7. ^ "Past WBCA HS Coaches' All-America Teams". Women's Basketball Coaches Association. Retrieved 1 Jul 2014. 
  8. ^ "Slideshow: espnW All-Americans". ESPN. Retrieved 14 Mar 2014. 
  9. ^ "USBWA ANNOUNCES 2013-14". U.S. Basketball Writers Association. March 31, 2014. Retrieved 2 Apr 2014. 
  10. ^ "Frances Pomeroy Naismith". Women's Basketball Coaches Association. Retrieved 30 Jun 2014. 
  11. ^ "The Wade Trophy". Women's Basketball Coaches Association. Retrieved 30 Jun 2014. 
  12. ^ Canizales, Nick. "Odyssey Sims Named Dawn Staley Award Winner". www.kcentv.com. Retrieved 2016-04-09. 

External links[edit]