Office of the Chief Scientist (Australia)

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The Office of the Chief Scientist (OCS) is part of the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science. Its primary responsibilities are to enable growth and productivity for globally competitive industries. To help realise this vision, the Department has four key objectives: supporting science and commercialisation, growing business investment and improving business capability, streamlining regulation and building a high performance organisation.

Chief Scientist[edit]

The Chief Scientist is responsible for advising the Government of Australia on scientific and technological issues.

The Chief Scientist chairs the Research Quality Framework Development Advisory Group,[1] the National Research Priorities Standing Committee[2] and is a member of other key Government committees:[3]

Chief Scientists[edit]

National Science and Technology Council[edit]

The National Science and Technology Council is responsible for providing advice to the Prime Minister and other Ministers on important science and technology issues facing Australia.

The Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Minister for Industry, Science and Technology, the Hon Karen Andrews MP, announced the new Council on 28 November 2018[16]

The Council is Chaired by the Prime Minister, with the Minister for Industry, Science and Technology as Deputy Chair. Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, is the Executive Officer.

History of Australian science councils[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 3 February 2007. Retrieved 30 January 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ http://www.dest.gov.au/sectors/research_sector/policies_issues_reviews/key_issues/national_research_priorities/national_research_priorities_standing_committee.htm
  3. ^ http://www.chiefscientist.dest.gov.au/Ongoing_activities_role.htm
  4. ^ http://ncris.innovation.gov.au/DEVELOPMENT/Pages/Committee.aspx
  5. ^ "Assessment Panel for Co-operative Multi-Media Centres". National Library of Australia. Archived from the original on 3 September 2006. Retrieved 2 February 2007.
  6. ^ "Pitman, Michael George (1933–2000)". Bright Sparcs Biographical entry. 14 September 2006. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  7. ^ "Michael George Pitman 1933–2000". Australian Academy of Science Biographical memoirs. 2002. Archived from the original on 18 July 2008. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  8. ^ a b W.J. Peacock (4 June 2004). "Submission to the Inquiry into the Office of the Chief Scientist". Australian Academy of Science. Archived from the original (RTF) on 25 July 2008. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  9. ^ "CSIRO welcomes Chief Scientist". 22 November 1996. Archived from the original on 5 June 2011. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  10. ^ "Batterham, Robin John (1941 – )". Bright Sparcs Biographical entry. 14 September 2006. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  11. ^ Barlow, Karen (17 May 2005). "Australia's Chief Scientist gives up Govt position for mining giant". ABC AM program. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  12. ^ Percy, Karen (1 March 2006). "New chief scientist makes waves". The World Today. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  13. ^ "ANU astronomer named new chief scientist". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 30 September 2008. Retrieved 7 February 2010.
  14. ^ "Statement: A message from Professor Chubb". Office of the Chief Scientist. 19 January 2016. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  15. ^ "Biography,AUSTRALIA'S CHIEF SCIENTIST". Office of the Chief Scientist. 25 January 2016. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  16. ^ https://www.pm.gov.au/media/stronger-voice-science-and-technology
  17. ^ https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/archive/PMSEIC
  18. ^ https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/commonwealth-science-council
  19. ^ https://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/national-science-and-technology-council

External links[edit]