Office to Combat Trafficking in Persons

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Office to Combat Trafficking in Persons
Agency overview
Formed2007
JurisdictionBritish Columbia, Canada

The Office to Combat Trafficking in Persons (OCTIP) is a government agency responsible for coordinating efforts to address human trafficking in British Columbia, Canada.[1] The focus of OCTIP's mandate is human rights, specifically those of the victims of human trafficking.[2] OCTIP formed in 2007, making British Columbia the first province of Canada to address human trafficking in a formal manner.[3] In 2008, the United States Department of State released a report on human trafficking in Canada that was generally critical of the Government of Canada for failing to address the issue, but the report praised the efforts of the Executive Council of British Columbia, specifically citing their creation of OCTIP.[4] In June 2011, OCTIP launched a training program to certify first responders to identify, protect, and assist victims of human trafficking in the province.[5] The program cost $106000; half of the funding came from OCTIP while the rest was covered by Public Safety Canada and the Department of Justice.[6] The following month, the Executive Council of British Columbia cut the annual budget for OCTIP from $500000 down to $300000, got rid of the executive director position, and reduced the number of full-time staff to two.[7] Robin Pike was the executive director before her position was eliminated.[8] Her last day of work was July 29.[9] Between 2007 and 2011, OCTIP serviced more than 100 human trafficking victims in British Columbia.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Human Trafficking in B.C." British Columbia Ministry of Justice. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  2. ^ "The Office to Combat Trafficking in Persons (OCTIP)". Survivors Connect. May 26, 2012. Archived from the original on April 16, 2013.
  3. ^ Benjamin Perrin (2010). Invisible Chains. Penguin Books. ISBN 0143178970.
  4. ^ "U.S. Report Critical of Canada's Human Trafficking Record". University of British Columbia. June 4, 2008. Archived from the original on December 23, 2008. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  5. ^ "Launch of First Anti-Human Trafficking On-line Training Program for Service Providers in British Columbia". Sys-Con Media. June 22, 2011. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  6. ^ "Launch of first anti-human trafficking online training for service providers in BC". Nelson Daily News. June 26, 2011. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  7. ^ Katie De Rosa (August 2, 2011). "Budget slashed for B.C. human trafficking office". National Post. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  8. ^ "B.C. human trafficking office funding slashed". CBC News. August 4, 2011. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  9. ^ Michelle Brock (August 3, 2011). "Disappointing News From the West: BC Office to Combat Trafficking in Persons Slashed". Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  10. ^ Andrew Weichel (August 3, 2011). "B.C.'s anti-human trafficking office gutted: collaborator". CTV News. Retrieved September 16, 2012.