OAG (Air Travel Intelligence)

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"OAG" redirects here. For other uses, see OAG (disambiguation).
Type Private company
Founded 1996, Luton, England
Headquarters Luton, England
Area served Europe, North America, Asia, Australasia and Latin America
Key people Phil Callow, CEO[1]
Industry Aviation, Travel
Website www.oag.com [1] www.flightview.com [[2]]
Available in Multilingual
Current status Active
Manchester Terminal 2 Apron June 2013.JPG

OAG is an air travel intelligence company based in United Kingdom. It provides digital information and applications to the world's airlines, airports, government agencies and travel-related service companies. OAG is best known for its airline schedules database which holds future and historical flight details for more than 900 airlines and over 4,000 airports.

OAG provides airline schedules data, flight status information and analytical applications. The organisation combines traditional partnerships with the major global distribution systems with a wider network, evolving network of providers across the air travel ecosystem.

Headquartered in the UK, OAG serves the air travel community from its global network of offices situated in the UK, USA, Singapore, Japan and China.

Early History[edit]

The OAG business dates back to 1853 when it first published the ABC Alphabetical Railway Guide, later to inspire Agatha Christie’s novel The ABC Murders. The origin of the OAG brand dates back to 1929 when the "Official Aviation Guide Of The Airways" was first published in February 1929 in the United States, listing 35 airlines offering a total of 300 flights. After the Guide was taken over by a rival publication in 1948, the September issue carried the OAG title for the first time. The "ABC World Airways Guide" containing maps and tips for travellers was first published in the UK in 1946. The integration of the ABC and OAG brands occurred following the acquisition of OAG Inc. in 1993 by Reed Elsevier which already owned ABC International.[2] In August 1996 all products from the combined ABC and OAG businesses were rebranded as OAG.

In 1958 advances in computer technology enabled flight schedules to be sorted and presented by city pair, instead of under separate sections for each airline timetable. This Quick Reference Edition initially included North American flights; starting in 1962 a separate International Quick Reference Edition covered the rest of the world. The two Timetable Editions continued in the traditional format for several more years; the last Worldwide Timetable Edition was March 1969.

In 1962 OAG began providing data to the first computer reservations systems and produced its first customised timetable for airlines. That year, it was acquired by Dun & Bradstreet.[3] In 1970 the OAG Pocket Flight Guide was published, enabling business travellers to have a pocket-sized resource of flight timetables to take with them. This is still published today, in four regional versions. OAG participated in the development of the IATA Standard Schedules Information Manual (SSIM) for the interchange of airline schedules data. This was established in 1972 and is still the primary source of protocols and formats for the global airline industry. The OAG Electronic Edition was launched in 1983. This was OAG's first online travel planning tool, containing both flight and fare information and available via more than 20 system operators including Compuserve, Dow Jones and Viewtron. Additional databases (weather, arrival/departure information) were added in 1988. That year, Dun & Bradstreet sold OAG to Maxwell Communications.[4] The company produced the industry’s first PC-based travel planning tool on CD-ROM in 1991, which was so revolutionary that it was supplied with a plug-in CD drive. OAG launched its pioneering analytical tool in 1998, and also its first browser-based travel information product. The Swedish CAA became its first internet timetable customer and the following year Cathay Pacific became the first airline to give its Frequent Flyer Club members online access to OAG Travel Information System through its website. As an early adopter of wireless technology, OAG made its flight information available on the Palm VII wireless organizer in 1999, followed a few months later by its first WAP mobile phone application.

Recent History[edit]

Reed Elsevier sold OAG to Electra Partners in 2001.[5] After five years under private ownership OAG was bought by United Business Media in December 2006 to strengthen its aviation, transportation and travel business interests. UBM sold the majority of its data business to Electra Partners in 2013, who formed AXIO Data Group.[6]

In 2012, OAG launched OAG Analyser to deliver airline schedule analysis via an online accessible tool[7]. In 2013, OAG added to its analytical suite with the launch of Traffic Analyser, a product developed in partnership with Travelport; a leading distribution services and e-commerce provider for the global travel industry.[8]

In 2014, OAG acquired the services of real-time flight information solutions provider, Flightview [[3]], to expand its flight data business.[9] November 2015 saw OAG sell MRO Network, a provider of aviation exhibitions, conferences and publications to the MRO, fleet, financing and leasing sectors.[10]


OAG provides digital information and applications using its OAG Schedules, and OAG Flight Status databases. It synchronises data from multiple sources and states of the travel continuum. Through its infrastructure, methods and relationships, it supports the air travel ecosystem.[11]

OAG Airline Schedules[edit]

OAG has a schedules database of more than 900 airlines, including 115 low-cost carriers and over 4000 airports. OAG Schedules provides the air transport industry with global airline information and analytical services. It manages the definitive airlines schedules database, providing a solution enabling over 900 of the world’s airlines to distribute their schedules across the industry’s global sales and marketing channels.

OAG Flight Status[edit]

OAG Flight Status is updated with over 700,000 messages per day, delivering information relating to arrivals/departures, airborne/touchdown times, cancellations, delays, gate changes, terminal changes, baggage claim changes, aircraft equipment and codeshare details.

OAG Analytics[edit]

OAG's analytics products combine software with industry data to identify trends, spot commercial opportunities and run high-impact reports that will sharpen other businesses' strategies and development plans.


  1. ^ "OAGsTeam". OAG. Retrieved October 27, 2015. 
  2. ^ Fabrikant, Geraldine (1993-05-12). "COMPANY NEWS; Maxwell Agrees to Sell Its Airline Guides Unit". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  3. ^ "History of The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation – FundingUniverse". Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  4. ^ Eichenwald, Kurt (1988-10-31). "Airline Guide Being Sold To Maxwell". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  5. ^ "Europe firm to lead management buyout of OAG - Travel Weekly". Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  6. ^ UBM data service sale disappoints market
  7. ^ "OAG Launches Next Generation of Airline Schedules Analysis". 
  8. ^ "African Aerospace - OAG launches new analysis tool to assist route planners". www.africanaerospace.aero. Retrieved 2015-11-25. 
  9. ^ Peltier, Dan; 20, Skift-Jan; Pm, 2015 1:00. "OAG Acquires FlightView to Grow its Flight Data Business". Skift. Retrieved 2015-10-27. 
  10. ^ "AviTrader – OAG to sell MRO Network business". Retrieved 2015-11-25. 
  11. ^ "OAG | AXIO Data Group". www.axiogroup.net. Retrieved 2015-10-27. 

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