Owo soup

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Owo soup

Owo is a soup eaten in the south-central region of Nigeria. It is common among ethnic groups such as Urhobo, Benin-bini, Itsekiri, Ijaw, and Edo. The soup is made with garri soaked in water after palm oil and potash mixture has been added. It is traditionally served at weddings in the Delta State; its absence at a wedding celebration is considered insulting to guests. It is also served at other traditional celebrations. It is especially important among the Urhobo people.

Names and etymology[edit]

The soup is also called oghwevwri, oghwoevwri, oghwo or owo; also oghwo ofigbo, ogwofibo and multiple other names. The name "Oghwo evwri" means "palm oil soup"; palm oil is a critical ingredient.[1]

Origin[edit]

Owho soup is a soup traditional to the south-central region of Nigeria.[2] it is common among ethnic groups such as Urhobo, Benin-bini, Itsekiri, Ijaw and Edo.[3][4][5][6][7] The soup is made with garri soaked in water after palm oil and potash mixture has been added.[3]

There is controversy about the origination of the soup. According to history, the soup is either from the Urhobo people or Bini people. Owho soup is commonly taken in Delta State as well as Edo state where the two tribes are populous.[5] It is especially revered by the Urhobo people.[3]

The soup takes its name from the city of Owo.[8]

Preparation[edit]

Owho soup is made from fish, Banga oil, beef, crayfish, palm oil, potash where garri is poured into palm oil thickened with potash.[4][9] Sometimes it is made with other ingredients such as bush meat.[10] The garri is blended initially to smoothen it, adding other ingredients like cray fish the soup is ready when there's floating oil on it.[6]

Serving[edit]

Owho soup is typically eaten with a starch (usi) such as boiled yam, boiled bananas, boiled plantain or sweet potatoes or other types of swallow but is sometimes eaten alone.[3][5][7][2]

The soup is traditionally served at weddings in the Delta State; its absence at a wedding celebration is considered insulting to guests.[3] It is also served at other traditional celebrations and at funerals.[4][11]

The soup is also sometimes served as a sauce.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Urhobo Owho Soup". All Nigerian Recipes. Retrieved 2023-06-20.
  2. ^ a b "Owo Soup". Punch Nigeria. 9 April 2022. Retrieved 2022-07-03.
  3. ^ a b c d e "5 local dishes you must have on your menu… or else!". Blueprint Newspapers Limited. 2018-10-06. Archived from the original on 2019-07-23. Retrieved 2022-07-03.
  4. ^ a b c "Here's how to cook the delicious owo soup". Pulse Nigeria. 2018-06-06. Archived from the original on 2022-07-03. Retrieved 2022-07-02.
  5. ^ a b c "Learn How To Make The Bini Owo Soup". The Guardian. 2019-06-23. Archived from the original on 2022-06-09. Retrieved 2022-07-02.
  6. ^ a b Omotolani (2021-07-24). "How to make Owo soup". Pulse Nigeria. Archived from the original on 2022-07-03. Retrieved 2022-07-02.
  7. ^ a b Boluwade, Favour (2020-05-02). "Owo soup is your go-to fast meal". Nigerian Tribune. Archived from the original on 2022-06-10. Retrieved 2022-07-02.
  8. ^ Udevi-Obiamaka, Angela (2019-10-08). "Origin of the Nigerian Delicacy, Owo Soup". Connect Nigeria. Retrieved 2022-07-03.
  9. ^ besthomediet (2020-08-15). "Owo Soup - How to Make Urhobo Owo Soup Recipe". besthomediet. Retrieved 2023-06-20.
  10. ^ "How to prepare the famous Bini Owo Soup". Effizzie Magazine. 2021-04-19. Archived from the original on 19 April 2021. Retrieved 2022-07-03.
  11. ^ Solanke, Simi. "Tribal Series: The Urhobo Tribe | NigerianReporter.com: Nigeria, News, Politics, Africa". NigerianReporter.com: Nigeria, News, Politics, Africa. Retrieved 2017-11-21.
  12. ^ Lete, Nky Lily (2016-03-14). "Owo Soup - Oghwo Ofigbo | Ogwofibo". Nigerian Food TV. Retrieved 2022-07-03.