Ognjen Tadić

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Ognjen Tadić
Ognjen Tadić Crop.jpg
Personal details
Born (1974-04-20) 20 April 1974 (age 43)
Sarajevo, Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
Political party Serbian Democratic Party
Alma mater University of Banja Luka

Ognjen Tadić (Огњен Тадић) (born 20 April 1974),[1] is a Bosnian Serb politician. He is a Co-Chair and MP in the House of Peoples in the Parliamentary Assembly of Bosnia and Herzegovina. He studied at the University of Banja Luka, where he earned a B.Sc. in the Faculty of Law and a master's degree in the Faculty of Political Science. He is a lawyer and newsman. Tadić is married and has three children.

Political career[edit]

Tadić was the Head of the Office of the President of the Republika Srpska (1998–99), Social Affairs Advisor (1999-2000) and Political Affairs Advisor (2005–06) of the President of the Republika Srpska.[citation needed]

From 2006-10, Tadić was MP in the National Assembly of the Republika Srpska. From 2010-14, he was MP in the House of Peoples in the Parliamentary Assembly of Bosnia and Herzegovina. From 2011-13, Tadić was Chairman of the House of Peoples. In 2014, Tadić was re-elected to another four-year mandate as an MP in the House of Peoples. He was re-elected for the Co-Chair of the House of Peoples for the period 2014-18.[citation needed]

In the 2007 presidential election, Tadić won 34.77 per cent of the vote[2] as a candidate of the Serbian Democratic Party.[citation needed]

In the 2010 elections, he won 36.00 per cent of votes as a candidate for president of the Together for Srpska coalition. In the 2014 elections, he won 44.28 per cent of votes as a candidate for president of the Alliance for Change coalition. Tadić is member of Parliamentary Assembly of the Mediterranean (2011–present). He was an observer in the Assembly of Western European Union (2008–10).[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ognjen Tadić biodata, predsjednik.rs; accessed 16 December 2015. Archived August 19, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ 2007 presidential election, izbori.ba; accessed 16 December 2015.