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Ohio State Route 249

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State Route 249 marker

State Route 249
Route information
Maintained by ODOT
Length14.45 mi[3] (23.26 km)
Existed1925[1][2]–present
Major junctions
West end CR 40 near Edgerton
  US 127 near Ney
East end SR 15 in Ney
Location
CountiesDefiance
Highway system
SR 248US 250

State Route 249 (SR 249) is an Ohio State Route that runs between the Indiana state line and Ney in the U.S. state of Ohio. The 14.45 miles (23.26 km) of SR 249 that lie within the state serve as a minor highway. None of the highway is listed on the National Highway System. The whole route is a rural two-lane highway and passes through farmland. The highway was first signed in 1925 and was a north–south route, a route that later became U.S. Route 127 (US 127). SR 249 was given its current route in 1927, as a replacement for SR 22. The route was completely paved by 1942.

Route description[edit]

SR 249 heads southeast from the Indiana–Ohio state line, as a two-lane highway passing through farmland, with some houses. The route passes over the St. Joseph River and turns due east. The highway has an intersection at SR 49, in rural Defiance County. After the intersection with SR 49 the highway enters farmland and woodland, with a few houses. The route has an intersection with SR 2, this intersection is the western terminus of the SR 2 concurrency. The concurrency heads east, passing through farmland, until SR 2 turns north in the community of Farmer. SR 249 heads east having an intersection with US 127. The route turns southeast, before ending at an intersection with SR 15 in Ney.[4][5]

There is no section of SR 249 that is included as a part of the National Highway System, a system of routes determined to be the most important for the nation's economy, mobility and defense.[6][7] The highway is maintained by the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) like all other state routes in the state. The department tracks the traffic volumes along all state highways as a part of its maintenance responsibilities using a metric called average annual daily traffic (AADT). This measurement is a calculation of the traffic level along a segment of roadway for any average day of the year. In 2009, ODOT figured that the lowest traffic level was 820 vehicles on the section that is concurrent with SR 2, and the peak traffic volume was 6,720 vehicles between US 127 and SR 15.[8]

History[edit]

The route that became SR 249 was first signed as SR 22 in 1923 following all of SR 249 as it is today and heading as far east-southeast as Marion. Also in this year the route east of Farmer was paved.[9][10] SR 249 made its debut in 1925, as a north–south route, on a section of road that is now US 127. The route went from SR 22, now SR 249, north to SR 9, now SR 15.[1][2] In 1927, SR 249 replaced part of SR 22, from the Indiana state line to Ney.[11][12] The rest of the route from the Indiana state line to Farmer was paved in 1942.[13][14] No significant changes have taken place to this state route since 1942.[5][14]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire route is in Defiance County.

Locationmi[3]kmDestinationsNotes
Milford Township0.000.00 CR 40 – AuburnWestern terminus of SR 249; Indiana state line
2.964.76 SR 49 – Hicksville, Edgerton
Farmer Township7.0511.35 SR 2 west – HicksvilleWestern end of SR 2 concurrency
9.0614.58 SR 2 east – BryanEastern end of SR 2 concurrency
Washington Township13.0120.94 US 127 – Paulding, Bryan
Ney14.4523.26 SR 15 – Bryan, Ney, DefianceEastern terminus of SR 249
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Map of Ohio Showing State Routes (MrSID) (Map). Cartography by ODHPW. Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works. August 1924. Retrieved January 8, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Map of Ohio Showing State Highway System (MrSID) (Map). Cartography by ODHPW. Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works. August 1, 1925. Retrieved January 8, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Ohio Department of Transportation. "Technical Services Straight Line Diagrams". Retrieved January 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Google (January 8, 2012). "Overview of Ohio State Route 249" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 8, 2012.
  5. ^ a b Ohio Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Cartography by ODOT. Ohio Department of Transportation. 2011. § A3–B3. Retrieved January 8, 2013.
  6. ^ National Highway System: Ohio (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. December 2003. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  7. ^ Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike; Adderly, Kevin (September 26, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  8. ^ Traffic Survey Report - Defiance County (PDF) (Map). Ohio Department of Transportation. 2009. Retrieved January 8, 2012.
  9. ^ Map of Ohio Showing State Routes (MrSID) (Map). Cartography by ODHPW. Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works. April 1922. Retrieved January 8, 2013.
  10. ^ Map of Ohio Showing State Highway System (MrSID) (Map). Cartography by ODHPW. Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works. July 1923. Retrieved January 8, 2013.
  11. ^ Map of Ohio Showing State Routes (MrSID) (Map). Cartography by ODHPW. Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works. August 1926. Retrieved January 8, 2012.
  12. ^ Map of Ohio Showing State Highway System (MrSID) (Map). Cartography by ODHPW. Ohio Department of Highways and Public Works. June 1927. Retrieved January 8, 2012.
  13. ^ Map of Ohio Showing State Routes (MrSID) (Map). Cartography by ODH. Ohio Department of Highways. 1941. § A4–B4. Retrieved January 9, 2012.
  14. ^ a b Map of Ohio Showing State Highway System (MrSID) (Map). Cartography by ODH. Ohio Department of Highways. 1942. § A4–B4. Retrieved January 9, 2012.

External links[edit]

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata