Okada Air

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Okada Air
OkadaAirLogo.JPG
IATA ICAO Callsign
9H OKJ OKADA AIR
Founded 1983 (1983)
Commenced operations September 1983 (1983-09)
Okada Air Boeing 747-100, Manchester, 1993
Okada Air Douglas DC-8, Luxembourg, 1985
The abandoned fleet of Okada Air at the Benin Airport, 2006. One Boeing 727 and 17 BAC 1-11 are visible

Okada Air was an airline based in Benin City, Nigeria. The carrier was established in 1983 with a fleet of BAC-One Eleven 300s.[1][2] and started charter operations in September the same year.[3] In 1984, a Boeing 707-355C was acquired for cargo operations. By 1990, ten BAC One-Elevens were bought, and eight more were acquired in 1991. The company was granted the right of operating international flights in 1992.[4]

The owner of Okada Air was Chief Gabriel Igbinedion, the Esama of Benin.[5] In 1997, the company was disestablished.

Destinations[edit]

Okada Air served the following destinations throughout its history:[3]

Historical Fleet Details[edit]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

Fatal accidents[edit]

Non-fatal hull-losses[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "World airline directory – Okada Air". Flight International. 143 (4362): 114. 24 March 1993 – 30 March 1993. Archived from the original on 5 August 2013.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. ^ "World airline directory – Okada Air". Flight International. 125 (3908): 874. 31 March 1984. Archived from the original on 5 August 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "World airline directory – Okada Air". Flight International. 149 (4517): 73. 3 April 1996 – 9 April 1996. Archived from the original on 5 August 2013.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  4. ^ Guttery (1998), p. 146.
  5. ^ Forrest, Tom (1994). The advance of African capital: the growth of Nigerian private enterprise. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press for the International African Institute. ISBN 0-7486-0492-8. 
  6. ^ Accident description for 5N-AOW at the Aviation Safety Network
  7. ^
  8. ^ Accident description for 5N-AOT at the Aviation Safety Network
  9. ^ Accident description for 5N-AOR at the Aviation Safety Network

Bibliography[edit]

  • Guttery, Ben R. (1998). Encyclopedia of African Airlines. Jefferson, North Carolina 28640: Mc Farland & Company, Inc. ISBN 0-7864-0495-7.