Olancha Peak

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Olancha Peak
Olancha Peak from Bald Mountain.jpg
Olancha Peak seen from Bald Mountain, summer 2007.
Highest point
Elevation12,132 ft (3,698 m)  NAVD 88[2]
Prominence3,083 ft (940 m) [3]
ListingSPS Emblem peak[1]
Coordinates36°15′55″N 118°07′05″W / 36.265179578°N 118.11815035°W / 36.265179578; -118.11815035Coordinates: 36°15′55″N 118°07′05″W / 36.265179578°N 118.11815035°W / 36.265179578; -118.11815035[2]
Geography
Olancha Peak is located in California
Olancha Peak
Olancha Peak
Location in California
Olancha Peak is located in the United States
Olancha Peak
Olancha Peak
Olancha Peak (the United States)
LocationTulare / Inyo counties, California, U.S.
Parent rangeSierra Nevada
Topo mapUSGS Olancha
Climbing
Easiest routeScramble, class 2[1]

Olancha Peak is located in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The mountain rises to an elevation of 12,132 feet (3,698 m)[2] on the Tulare-Inyo county line in the South Sierra Wilderness.[3] It takes its name from the nearby town of Olancha.[4]

The mountain is also known as "Indianhead" and "the Sleeping Maiden" as some think that parts of the ridgeline of the southern slope of the mountain, when viewed from certain angles, resembles either the face of a man or the figure of a woman lying on her back.

The peak is also one of the highest in the Sierra Nevada south of Mount Whitney. It is the southernmost peak on the Sierra Nevada escarpment whose peak is significantly above the treeline.[5] Due to the high elevation, most of the precipitation the mountain receives consists of snow.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Sierra Peaks Section List" (PDF). Angeles Chapter, Sierra Club. Retrieved 2008-09-28.
  2. ^ a b c "Olancha". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey. Retrieved 2008-12-27.
  3. ^ a b "Olancha Peak, California". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2009-06-25.
  4. ^ Farquhar, Francis P. (1926). Place Names of the High Sierra. San Francisco: Sierra Club. Retrieved 2009-06-25.
  5. ^ Google Earth images.
  6. ^ "Subsection M261Eo - Glaciated Batholith". U.S. Forest Service. Archived from the original on 2007-08-13. Retrieved 2014-01-18.

External links[edit]