Oleksandr Kuzmuk

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Oleksandr Ivanovich Kuzmuk
Олекса́ндр Іва́нович Кузьму́к
Oleksandr Kuzmuk.jpg
4th and 7th Minister of Defense
In office
24 September 2004 – 3 February 2005
PresidentLeonid Kuchma
Preceded byYevhen Marchuk
Succeeded byAnatoliy Hrytsenko
In office
11 July 1996 – 24 October 2001
PresidentLeonid Kuchma
Preceded byValeriy Shmarov
Succeeded byVolodymyr Shkidchenko
Personal details
Born
Oleksandr Ivanovich Kuzmuk

(1954-04-17) April 17, 1954 (age 65)
Diatylivka, Khmelnytskyi Oblast, Ukrainian SSR
Political partyParty of Regions
Spouse(s)Lyudmila
ChildrenIvan and Maria
Alma materKharkiv Higher Armor Command College
Malynovsky Military Academy of Armor Forces
Military service
Allegiance Soviet Union (to 1991)
 Ukraine
Branch/service Soviet Army
 Ukrainian Ground Forces
Years of service1975 - 2001
RankGeneral of Army of Ukraine
Commands32nd Army Corps
Ukrainian National Guard

Oleksandr Kuzmuk (Ukrainian: Олекса́ндр Іва́нович Кузьму́к; born 17 April 1954) is a Ukrainian politician and military officer, who is member of the Party of Regions and was the Minister of Defense of Ukraine (1996–2001, 2004–2005). Kuzmuk formerly commanded the National Guard of Ukraine (1995–1996) and holds the highest rank in the Ukrainian military, General of the Army of Ukraine (1998).

Biography[edit]

Kuzmuk was born on April 17, 1954 in a family of military officer Ivan Fedorovych Kuzmuk (?-1973) and Rayisa Mykhailivna Kuzmuk in a village of Diatylivka, Slavuta Raion (Khmelnytskyi Oblast). In 1975 he graduated the Kharkiv Higher Armor Command College. In 1975-80 Kuzmuk starting out as a platoon leader of armor forces served until becoming the deputy chief of staff of an armor regiment. In 1980-83 he was an audit student of the Malynovsky Military Academy of Armor Forces (Moscow). After that until 1988 Kuzmuk was an instructor at the academy.

In 1988-93 he was in leading positions of mechanized rifle division. From 1975 to 1993 Kuzmuk served in the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany, Belorussian Military District, Moscow Military District, Leningrad Military District, Carpathian Military District and Odessa Military District. In 1993-95 he was a commander of the 32nd Army Corps, senior military chief of Crimea.

In 1995-96 Kuzmuk was a commander of the National Guard of Ukraine and in 1996-2001 - the Minister of Defense. At the end of 2001 he finished his military career and became a politician by participating in the Ukrainian parliamentary election, 2002 on the party list of For United Ukraine. Soon after winning some seats in the Verkhovna Rada, For United Ukraine fell apart and Kuzmuk stayed with the Labour Ukraine (an off-shot of the Labour Party of Ukraine). During that time in 2004 he was again appointed the Minister of Defense, while keeping his parliamentary seat. After the Orange Revolution Kuzmuk lost his ministerial seat and was replaced by Anatoliy Hrytsenko.

In the 2012 parliamentary election Kuzmuk was elected into parliament as a member of Party of Regions.[1]

In the 2014 parliamentary election Kuzmuk tried to win a parliamentary seat through winning electoral district 38 situated in Novomoskovsk; but failed when he ended 3rd in the district with 12.78%.[2] The announcement of the final result for electoral district 38 (won by Vadym Nesterenko) was delayed till mid-November because Kuzmuk challenged the results in court claiming Nesterenko was guilty of fraud and bribery of voters.[1]

Awards and decorations[edit]

Kuzmuk has been awarded the following awards and decorations:[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b (in Ukrainian) In the 38th district of Dnipropetrovsk stop recount, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (17 November 2014)
  2. ^ (in Ukrainian) Candidates and winners for the seat of constituency #38 in the 2014 Ukrainian parliamentary election, RBK Ukraine
  3. ^ Кузьмук Олександр Іванович (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 19 May 2014.

External links[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
Volodymyr Kukharets
National Guard Commander
1995–1996
Succeeded by
Ihor Valkiv
Preceded by
Commander of the 32nd Army Corps
1993–1995
Succeeded by