Oliver Chris

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Oliver Chris
Born Oliver Graham Chris
(1978-11-02) 2 November 1978 (age 39)
Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Education Tunbridge Wells Grammar School for Boys, Kent
Michael Hall (independent Steiner School), East Sussex
Alma mater Central School of Speech and Drama, London
Birkbeck College, University of London
Years active 2000–present

Oliver Graham Chris (born 2 November 1978 in Tonbridge, Kent) is an English actor. He has appeared in a range of television series and TV films and on the stage, including theatrical productions in London's West End and Broadway in New York City.

Early life[edit]

Chris passed his Eleven plus exam and attended Tunbridge Wells Grammar School for Boys before moving to the Michael Hall Steiner School in his fourth year. He later attended the Central School of Speech and Drama. In 2005 he completed an evening class at Birkbeck College and was subsequently accepted for a degree course in history, politics and philosophy.[1]

Career[edit]

Chris has appeared in several comedy series, including The Office, Green Wing, According to Bex, Nathan Barley, The IT Crowd, Rescue Me and Bluestone 42.

In 2004, Chris re-wrote the lyrics to the Beatles' "Let It Be" to a song about the England football player Wayne Rooney and recorded it in collaboration with the actor Stephen Campbell Moore and a number of other actors and journalists. The song was reprised and re-recorded, with rewritten lyrics, for the 2006 Fifa World Cup and became a hit on YouTube, with 200,000 hits.

Chris has also narrated most of the Alex Rider series of audiobooks by Anthony Horowitz, although Dan Stevens replaced him as reader for "Snakehead", "Crocodile Tears" and "Scorpia Rising".

In early 2006, Chris played the role of Captain Leonard in Sharpe's Challenge, starring Sean Bean, while 2007 has seen him in the TV comedy Bonkers, written by Sally Wainwright as well as Petruchio in The Taming of the Shrew at the Wilton's Music Hall.[2][3] In 2006 he also appeared as Christian in Cyrano de Bergerac at the Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester. He later appeared in Peter Hall's production of The Portrait of a Lady. He made his West End debut in late 2008 in Lisa Kron's comedy, Well.[4] In 2010 he appeared alongside Judi Dench in Hall's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Rose Theatre, Kingston.[5]

Chris was also cast in Ben Miller's feature-length debut comedy film Huge, which premiered in June 2010.[6] 2011 has seen him appear in two episodes of Silent Witness, whilst also playing one of the leading roles in the National Theatre production of One Man, Two Guvnors alongside James Corden. He appeared in three series of the BBC Three comedy Bluestone 42, about a British bomb disposal detachment in Afghanistan. He also played Dr Richard Truscott in the ITV medical drama series Breathless, set in the 1960s, which ran for one series from October 2013.

From 2014 to 2016, Chris played Prince William in the play King Charles III, appearing in the West End and on Broadway. In May 2017, he appeared in the same role in the BBC Two film adaptation.[7]

February to May 2017 Chris was playing Orsino in a new production of Twelfth Night at the Royal National Theatre. He is due to play Friedrich Engels in Richard Bean and Clive Coleman's new play Young Marx, the opening production at the Bridge Theatre in December 2017.

Filmography[edit]

Film and television
Year Title Role Notes
2000 Lorna Doone Charley Doone TV film
2001 Office, TheThe Office Ricky Howard 6 episodes
2002 Gathering, TheThe Gathering Brett
Rescue Me Luke Chatwin Series regular
Real Jane Austen, TheThe Real Jane Austen Tom Lefroy
2003 Other Boleyn Girl, TheThe Other Boleyn Girl Henry Percy TV film
Casualty Tim Lasky 1 episode: "The Point of No Return"
Sweet Medicine Geoff Episode 1.8
Frankenstein: Birth of a Monster Percy Bysshe Shelley TV film
2004 Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason Director in Gallery
2004–2006 Green Wing Boyce 18 episodes
2005 Nathan Barley Max Herbert Series regular
According to Bex Ryan
2006 The IT Crowd Daniel Carey 1 episode: 'Fifty-Fifty'
Sharpe's Challenge Leonard TV film
Tripping Over Sam 4 episodes
Corpse Kevin Brown Short film
2007 Bonkers Marcus Lewis Series regular
Phineas and Ferb Mr. Macabre (voice) "Terrifying Tri-State Trilogy of Terror"
2008 Fairy Tales Vukoosin Ergovich TV mini-series, 1 episode: 'Rapunzel'
Hotel Babylon David Duncan Episode 3.1
2009 FM Matt Kyle 1 episode: 'Blinded by the Light'
2010 Huge Darren Post-production
2011 Silent Witness Dr. James Sabiston 2 episodes
One Man, Two Guvnors Stanley Stubbers
2013 Bluestone 42 Captain Nick Medhurst, ATO Series regular
Breathless Dr. Richard Truscott
2015 The Scandalous Lady W Viscount Deerhurst TV film
2017 King Charles III Prince William TV film

Theatre[edit]

Theatre
Year Title Role Theatre
2002 The Importance of Being Ernest Algernon Royal Theatre (Northampton)
2007 The Taming of the Shrew Petruchio Wilton's Music Hall
2007 Cyrano de Bergerac Christian Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester
2008 The Portrait of a Lady Goodwood UK Tour
2010 A Midsummer Night's Dream Nick Bottom Rose Theatre
2011 One Man, Two Guvnors Stanley Stubbers Royal National Theatre, (Lyttelton Stage) + UK 2011 Tour + Adelphi Theatre + Broadway
2014-2016 King Charles III William Almeida Theatre,+ Wyndham's Theatre,+ Broadway
2014 Great Britain Asst. Commissioner Donald Doyle Davidson Royal National Theatre (Lyttleton stage)
2017 Twelfth Night Orsino Royal National Theatre,Olivier Stage
2017 Young Marx Friedrich Engels Bridge Theatre

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jonathan Sale (10 November 2005). "Passed/Failed: An education in the life of Oliver Chris, actor". The Independent. Archived from the original on 20 June 2011. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 
  2. ^ Entertainment.timesOnline.co.uk
  3. ^ Wiltons.org.uk Archived 11 March 2007 at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ Close-up: Oliver Chris The Independent. 28 December 2008
  5. ^ A Midsummer Night's Dream Theatre Mania. 16 February 2010
  6. ^ Ben Miller is Huge at EIFF Edinburgh International Film Festival. 16 June 2010
  7. ^ "King Charles III: everything you need to know about the BBC's controversial royal drama". The Telegraph. Retrieved 2017-05-10. 

External links[edit]