Olympia Experimental Music Festival

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Olympia Experimental Music Festival
Dendrites (band) 09A.jpg
Portland, Oregon band Dendrites perform at the 14th Olympia Experimental Music Festival, 2008.
Genre Electronic music, experimental music
Location(s) Olympia, Washington
Years active 1995-present
Founded by L. Jim McAdams
Website
Olympia Strange Music MySpace page

The Olympia Experimental Music Festival, also known for a time as The Olympia Festival of Experimental Musics,[1] has been produced annually in Olympia, Washington since 1995.[2] Organizers have included festival founder L. Jim McAdams,[3] Arrington de Dionyso (founder of the Olympia Strange Music Society),[3] Aerick Duckhugger,[3] and Domenica Clark.[4] During de Dionyso's tenure as chief organizer (festivals 9–12) the festival was primarily known by the alternate name The Olympia Festival of Experimental Musics.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Portland, Maine performance artist Crank Sturgeon performs at the 14th Olympia Experimental Music Festival, 2008.

Performers have included Acre,[5] Alps of New South Wales,[5] A Nat Hema,[6] Wendy Atkinson,[5] Atropy Minor,[6] Argumentix,[5] Better People,[5] Blue Sabbath Black Cheer,[5] Bran Flakes,[7] Cabinet of Natural Curiosities,[5] Celesteville,[5] Crank Sturgeon,[8] Dead Air Fresheners,[8][9] Amy Denio,[10] Dendrites,[8] Arrington de Dionyso, Paul Dutton, Evolution Control Committee,[11] Steve Fisk,[8][11] Foque Mopus,[10] Gang Wizard,[3] Hans Grusel's Krankenkabinet,[5] Bill Horist,[10] KnotPineBox,[8] Al Larsen, Le Ton Mite, METAL,[5] Midmight,[5] Nequaquam Vacuum,[5] Noggin,[1] Noisettes,[5] Office Products, Oliver Squash,[5] Plants,[5] Gino Robair,[1] Sluggo,[11] Chuck Swaim,[7] Jennifer Robin,[12] White Rainbow,[5] Bert Wilson,[1] Wood Paneling,[1][5][9] Paintings for Animals,[13] LA Lungs,[13] Four Dimensional Nightmare,[13] Super Unity, Eurostache,[13] and Nathan Cearley (at the time performing as Godzilla).

In addition to unusual, experimental, and/or noise music, many festival performers use film, multimedia, and spoken word. Yahoo News in 2007 called it a "summer festival to watch".[14] In Signum, writer Tiffany Lee Brown commented in 2001: "This was no overpriced, fancypants event full of goatee-stroking theorizers or a showcase of overserious minimalist compositions, but a romp through the tangled underbrush of homegrown experimentalism."[12]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Christopher Delaurenti, Classical, Jazz, & Avant: Experimental Music Festival, The Stranger, June 26 – July 2, 2003 issue. Accessed online July 3, 2008.
  2. ^ Tiffany Lee Brown, Bleepy-Bloopy Noises: Creepy-crawly creatures emerge for the Olympia Experimental Music Festival, Signum magazine, Marrow section, issue 12, 2001. Accessed online July 3, 2008. Refers to the 2001 festival as "the 7th Annual".
  3. ^ a b c d Tiffany Lee Brown, "Bleepy-Bloopy Noises", page 2. Accessed online July 3, 2008.
  4. ^ Program, 14th Olympia Experimental Music Festival, p. 10.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Olympia Experimental Music Festival, 13th Annual Olympia Experimental Music Festival (2007) listing on Yahoo! Upcoming Events and Things To Do. Accessed July 7, 2008.
  6. ^ a b Tiffany Lee Brown, "Bleepy-Bloopy Noises", page 7. Accessed online July 3, 2008.
  7. ^ a b Tiffany Lee Brown, "Bleepy-Bloopy Noises", page 4. Accessed online July 3, 2008.
  8. ^ a b c d e Program, 14th Olympia Experimental Music Festival, p. 4.
  9. ^ a b Tiffany Lee Brown, "Bleepy-Bloopy Noises", page 3. Accessed online July 3, 2008.
  10. ^ a b c Program, 14th Olympia Experimental Music Festival, p. 3.
  11. ^ a b c Tiffany Lee Brown, "Bleepy-Bloopy Noises", page 6. Accessed online July 3, 2008.
  12. ^ a b Tiffany Lee Brown, "Bleepy-Bloopy Noises",page 1. Accessed online July 3, 2008.
  13. ^ a b c d Ahrendt, Daniel. "Olympia Experimental Music Festival: Paintings for Animals, LA Lungs, Eurostache, and More". SSG Music. Retrieved June 26, 2011. 
  14. ^ Author unknown, Yahoo Upcoming. Accessed online July 3, 2008.

References[edit]

External links[edit]