Oman Football Association

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Oman Football Association
AFC
Oman Football Association logo.svg
Founded1978 (1978)
HeadquartersMuscat, Oman[1]
FIFA affiliation1978
AFC affiliation1980[2]
WAFF affiliation2010
PresidentSheikh Salem Said Salem Al Wahaibi
Websitehttp://ofa.om/

The Oman Football Association (Arabic: الاتحاد العُماني لكرة القدم) is the governing body of football in Oman. It was founded in 1978, has been a member of the Asian Football Confederation and of FIFA since 1980.

History[edit]

Oman plays against Japan in the qualifying rounds for the 2010 FIFA World Cup

The first football club of the Sultanate (documented as such) was the Maqboul Club, founded in 1942, known today as the Oman Club. In the 1970s, Qaboos bin Said al Said favored the development of sports events and associations, which led in 1978 to the creation of the Omani Football Association with Sayyid / Haitham bin Tariq Al Said (Minister of National Heritage and Culture and in 2020, the successor to Qaboos as Sultan) as its first president. In its first year of operations, the Association became a member of the Union of Arab Football Associations and of the FIFA, and then joined the Asian Football Federation in 1980.[3]

In November 2017, the OFA was chosen to organize the FIFA Executive Football Summit scheduled for February 2018.[4]

Association staff[edit]

Name Position Source
Oman Sheikh Salem Said Salem Al Wahaibi President [5][6]
Oman Mohsin Al Masroori Senior Vice President [7][8]
Oman Jasim Mohammed Khamis Al Shekaili 2nd Vice President [9]
Oman Said Othman Mohamed Al Bulushi General Secretary [10][11]
n/a Treasurer
Serbia Slobodan Pavković Technical Director [12][13]
Croatia Branko Ivanković Team Coach (Men's) [14]
n/a Team Coach (Women's)
William Boukarroum Media/Communications Manager [15]
n/a Futsal Coordinator
Omer Khalaf Referee Coordinator [16]

Description[edit]

Oman has a total of 45 clubs divided into three divisions. The First Division has 12 clubs, Second Division has 13 clubs while the Third Division has 20 clubs.

Oman is looking to take advantage of FIFA's assistance in the GOAL project to further develop the game in Oman.

The Association is 70%-financed by the government through the Ministry of Sports Affairs (2010).[17]

Individual awards[edit]

Year Player Award
1995 Mohamed Al Kathiri 1995 Asian Young Footballer of the Year
1995 Mohamed Al Kathiri Golden Ball of 1995 FIFA U-17 World Championship
2002 Hani Al Dhabit Golden Shoe of the 15th Arabian Gulf Cup
2003 Ali Al-Habsi Best Goalkeeper of the 16th Arabian Gulf Cup
2004 Imad Al-Hosni Golden Shoe of the 17th Arabian Gulf Cup
2004 Ali Al-Habsi Best Goalkeeper of the 17th Arabian Gulf Cup
2007 Ali Al-Habsi Best Goalkeeper of the 18th Arabian Gulf Cup
2009 Ali Al-Habsi Best Goalkeeper of the 19th Arabian Gulf Cup

Team awards and achievements[edit]

Year Team Award Competition
1989 Oman Fanja Won first-place trophy Gulf Clubs Championship 1989
1994 Oman Oman F.C. Won second place Asian Club Championship 1993-94
1994  Oman U-17 Team Won third-place trophy AFC U-17 Championship 1994
1995  Oman U-17 Team Reached fourth place in tournament 1995 FIFA U-17 World Championship
1995 Oman Dhofar S.C.S.C. Won second place Gulf Clubs Championship 1995
1996  Oman U-17 Team Won first-place trophy AFC U-17 Championship 1996
2000  Oman U-17 Team Won first-place trophy AFC U-17 Championship 2000
2004 Oman Oman National Team Won second-place trophy 17th Arabian Gulf Cup
2007 Oman Oman National Team Won second-place trophy 18th Arabian Gulf Cup
2009 Oman Oman National Team Won the Gulf Cup 19th Arabian Gulf Cup
2012  Oman U-21 Team Runners up AFC VS CAF Olympics 2012
2015 Oman Seeb Was 1st Runners up Gulf Clubs Championship 2015

Omani League teams 2010-11[edit]

Al-Ahli (Sedab)
Al-Hilal (Salalah)
Al-Nahda
Al-Nasr
Al-Oruba
Al-Shabab
Al-Suwaiq
Al-Talia
Dhofar
Muscat
Oman FC
Saham

See also[edit]

Oman Professional League - National football league of Oman

Sultan Qaboos Cup - National cup of Oman

Oman Professional League Cup - League cup of Oman

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Member Associations". Archived from the original on January 15, 2020.
  2. ^ June 25, 1980: "Asian Football Confederation holds 9th congress in Hong Kong: Oman and Democratic Yemen were admitted into the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) by a resolution passed at its ninth congress here yesterday, thus bringing the AFC total membership to 35." Xinhua General News Service
  3. ^ History, Ofa.com
  4. ^ Ashok Purohit, Oman to host FIFA Executive Football Summit Archived 2018-04-14 at the Wayback Machine, Muscatdaily.com, 8 November 2017
  5. ^ FIFA.com. "Member Association - Oman - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2020. Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  6. ^ "The AFC.com - The Asian Football Confederation". The AFC. Retrieved 2020-11-02.
  7. ^ FIFA.com. "Member Association - Oman - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2020. Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  8. ^ "The AFC.com - The Asian Football Confederation". The AFC. Retrieved 2020-11-02.
  9. ^ "The AFC.com - The Asian Football Confederation". The AFC. Retrieved 2020-11-02.
  10. ^ FIFA.com. "Member Association - Oman - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2020. Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  11. ^ "The AFC.com - The Asian Football Confederation". The AFC. Retrieved 2020-11-02.
  12. ^ FIFA.com. "Member Association - Oman - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2020. Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  13. ^ "The AFC.com - The Asian Football Confederation". The AFC. Retrieved 2020-11-02.
  14. ^ "The AFC.com - The Asian Football Confederation". The AFC. Retrieved 2020-11-02.
  15. ^ FIFA.com. "Member Association - Oman - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2020. Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  16. ^ FIFA.com. "Member Association - Oman - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2020. Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  17. ^ Majid AL-Busafi, Oman: An Emerging Sport Nation, History and Future Directions Archived 2017-12-01 at the Wayback Machine, Ijssjournal.com, 2012

External links[edit]