Omega Draconis

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Omega Draconis
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Draco
Right ascension 17h 36m 57.09403s[1]
Declination +68° 45′ 28.6961″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 4.80[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type F5V[3]
U−B color index −0.01[2]
B−V color index +0.43[2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) −13.98 ± 0.02[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 2.58[1] mas/yr
Dec.: 321.73[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 43.17 ± 0.17[1] mas
Distance 75.6 ± 0.3 ly
(23.16 ± 0.09 pc)
Orbit[5]
Period (P) 5.2797766 ± 0.0000044 d
Semi-major axis (a) 3.469 ± 0.017 mas
Eccentricity (e) 0.00220 ± 0.00031
Inclination (i) 151.4 ± 1.1°
Longitude of the node (Ω) 1.23 ± 0.32°
Periastron epoch (T) JD 2454349.083 ± 0.083
Argument of periastron (ω)
(secondary)
314.8 ± 5.6°
Semi-amplitude (K1)
(primary)
36.254 ± 0.016 km/s
Semi-amplitude (K2)
(secondary)
44.720 ± 0.016 km/s
Details
ω Dra A
Mass 1.46 ± 0.16 M
Temperature 6500 K
Metallicity [Fe/H] 0.0 dex
ω Dra B
Mass 1.18 ± 0.13 M
Temperature 5900 K
Other designations
28 Dra, BD+68° 949, HD 160922, HIP 86201, HR 6596, SAO 17576, GJ 4017
Database references
SIMBAD data

Omega Draconis (ω Dra), also known as 28 Draconis, is a binary star in the constellation of Draco. The system is fairly close, and is located about 76 light-years (23 parsecs) away, based on its parallax.[1]

Omega Draconis is a spectroscopic binary, which means the two stellar components are too close to be resolved but periodic Doppler shifts in their spectra indicate orbital motion. In this case, light from both stars can be detected, and it is a double-lined spectroscopic binary. The orbital period of the system is 5.28 days, and the eccentricity of the system is 0.00220, implying a nearly circular orbit. The primary has a mass of 1.46 M, and is an F-type main-sequence star. The secondary is less massive, at 1.18 M.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F.; et al. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. arXiv:0708.1752Freely accessible. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357. 
  2. ^ a b c Johnson, H. L. (1966). "UBVRIJKL Photometry of the Bright Stars". Communications of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. 4: 99. Bibcode:1966CoLPL...4...99J. 
  3. ^ Eggen, O. (1957). "Distribution of the nearer bright stars in the color-luminosity array". The Astronomical Journal. 62: 45. Bibcode:1957AJ.....62...45E. doi:10.1086/107457. 
  4. ^ Pourbaix, D.; et al. (2004). "SB9: The ninth catalogue of spectroscopic binary orbits". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 424 (2): 727. Bibcode:2004A&A...424..727P. arXiv:astro-ph/0406573Freely accessible. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20041213. 
  5. ^ a b Konacki, Maciej; et al. (2010). "High-precision Orbital and Physical Parameters of Double-lined Spectroscopic Binary Stars—HD78418, HD123999, HD160922, HD200077, and HD210027". The Astrophysical Journal. 719 (2): 1293–1314. Bibcode:2010ApJ...719.1293K. arXiv:0910.4482Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/719/2/1293.