One Riverside Park

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One Riverside Park
40 Riverside Boulevard
Artist's rendering of One Riverside Park's
Artist's rendering of One Riverside Park's
One Riverside Park's location in manhattan
One Riverside Park's location in manhattan
Location within Manhattan
General information
StatusIn development
TypeResidential
Location40 Riverside Boulevard or 425 Freedom Place, New York, NY 10069
United States
Coordinates40°46′28″N 73°59′29″W / 40.774442°N 73.991418°W / 40.774442; -73.991418Coordinates: 40°46′28″N 73°59′29″W / 40.774442°N 73.991418°W / 40.774442; -73.991418
Construction started2012
Completed2015
Opening2016-2019
Technical details
Floor count33
Design and construction
ArchitectGoldstein, Hill & West Architects
DeveloperExtell Development Company
Structural engineerWSP Cantor Seinuk
Other designersShamir Shah

One Riverside Park is a skyscraper currently under development located at 40 Riverside Boulevard in Riverside South, on the Upper West Side neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Its name was later changed to 50 Riverside Boulevard following media reports related to the development's "poor door."[1] The building will consist of 33 floors containing 219 residential units.[2]

The building was designed by the architectural firm Goldstein, Hill & West Architects, who also designed The Aldyn and The Ashley, also on Riverside Boulevard, plus the Silver Towers Manhattan development. The building has an underground tunnel linking residents to the LA PALESTRA Athletic Club & Spa next door in The Aldyn.

Location[edit]

One Riverside Park is the last of the exclusively residential developments in Riverside South, hence the "one" name indicating its position at the start of Riverside Boulevard. The One Riverside Park address and brand were trademarked in April 2013 by the Extell Development Company.[3]

To the south of One Riverside Park, the other side of 62nd Street, Riverside Center will provide services to the high rise developments in the Riverside South site. Riverside Center will feature 3.2 acres of open space, a new K-8 public school and over 100,000 square feet of retail, shops and services.[4][5]

The last potentially remaining development of the Riverside South site would be the possible relocation and burying of the West Side Highway in front of One Riverside Park from approximately West 59th Street to West 72nd Street to facilitate an expansion of Riverside Park. Plans for this work on the highway were approved by the Federal Highway Administration in 2001.[6] However, given the 1990s reconstruction of the highway viaduct, the additional highway development is uncertain, at least in the near term.

Controversy[edit]

In 2013, Extell came under fire in the New York Post and Gawker Media for building separate entrances for the affluent condo tenants and the Affordable Housing tenants, a "poor door".[7][8] However, as the New York Post writer Steve Cuozzo pointed out two entrances are "not only legal, they’re legally required."[9][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "One Riverside Park, 50 Riverside Boulevard". CityRealty. Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  2. ^ Fung, Amanda (2011-07-25). "Latest Riverside South tower to be glassiest". Crains.
  3. ^ "ONE RIVERSIDE PARK". legalforce.com. 2013-08-23.
  4. ^ Loria, Keith (November 21, 2013). "Extell Development Co. Launches Sales in NYC's Upper West Side Luxury Condos". Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  5. ^ "RIVERSIDE CENTER". Extell Development Company. Retrieved 2013-12-02.
  6. ^ "RSC Subcommittee Report Riverside Park South" (PDF). Retrieved September 26, 2016.
  7. ^ Briquelet, Kate (2013-08-18). "Upper West Side condo has separate entrances for rich and poor". New York Post. Retrieved 2013-08-18.
  8. ^ Zimmerman, Neetzan (2013-08-18). "Outrage Over Separate Doors for Rich and Poor in Manhattan High-Rise". Gawker Media. Retrieved 2013-08-18.
  9. ^ Cuozzo, Steve (2013-08-27). "The truth about the 'Poor Door'". New York Post. Retrieved 2013-12-02.
  10. ^ Smith-Mack, Mitzie (May 1, 2015). "Thousands of applicants are willing to accept NYC "Poor Door" building". Philadelphia: Ballard Spahr LLP.

External links[edit]